jm + employment   7

Google’s Response to Employee’s Anti-Diversity Manifesto Ignores Workplace Discrimination Law – Medium
A workplace-discrimination lawyer writes:
Stray remarks are not enough. But a widespread workplace discussion of whether women engineers are biologically capable of performing at the same level as their male counterparts could suffice to create a hostile work environment. As another example, envision the racial hostility of a workplace where employees, as Google put it, “feel safe” to espouse their “alternative view” that their African-American colleagues are not well-represented in management positions because they are not genetically predisposed for leadership roles. In short, a workplace where people “feel safe sharing opinions” based on gender (or racial, ethnic or religious) stereotypes may become so offensive that it legally amounts to actionable discrimination.
employment  sexism  workplace  discrimination  racism  misogyny  women  beliefs 
10 weeks ago by jm
The Gig Economy Celebrates Working Yourself to Death - The New Yorker
At the root of this is the American obsession with self-reliance, which makes it more acceptable to applaud an individual for working himself to death than to argue that an individual working himself to death is evidence of a flawed economic system. The contrast between the gig economy’s rhetoric (everyone is always connecting, having fun, and killing it!) and the conditions that allow it to exist (a lack of dependable employment that pays a living wage) makes this kink in our thinking especially clear.
capitalism  culture  gig-economy  lyft  fiverr  work  jobs  employment  self-reliance 
march 2017 by jm
Don’t Get Trampled: The Puzzle For “Unicorn” Employees
'One of my sad predictions for 2017 is a bunch of big headline-worthy acquisitions and IPOs that leave a lot of hard working employees at these companies in a weird spot. They’ll be congratulated by everyone they know for their extraordinary success while scratching their heads wondering why they barely benefited. Of course, the reason is that these employees never understood their compensation in the first place (and they were not privy to the terms of all the financings before and after they were hired).'
share-options  shares  unicorns  funding  employment  jobs  compensation 
march 2017 by jm
3 Lessons From The Amazon Takedown - Fortune
They are: The leaders we admire aren’t always that admirable; Economic performance and costs trump employee well-being; and people participate in and rationalize their own subjugation.

'In the end, “Amazonians” are not that different from other people in their psychological dynamics. Their company is just a more extreme case of what many other organizations regularly do. And most importantly, let’s locate the problem, if there is one, and its solution where it most appropriately belongs—not with a CEO who is greatly admired (and wealthy beyond measure) running a highly admired company, but with a society where money trumps human well-being and where any price, maybe even lives, is paid for status and success.'

(via Lean)
amazon  work  work-life-balance  life  us  fortune  via:ldoody  ceos  employment  happiness 
august 2015 by jm
The Pizza Party Where Everyone Got Fired
The testers at [MAJOR PUBLISHER] had just finished wrapping up testing on a project we'll call "Biolands." And to congratulate them, the man in charge arranged a huge bowling/pizza party for the end of the week. Of course everyone is hyped for the event. So the day finally arrives and all the testers show up. They all start bowling and eating pizza. After a few hours of everyone enjoying themselves, the VP asks for everyone's attention. When he does manage to get the team to listen, he begins to thank them for their hard work and has the leads hand them their termination papers.


And many other horror stories from the worst software industry of all -- games.
games  software  jobs  bowling  pizza  fired  horror-stories  hr  employment 
february 2015 by jm
Sacked Google worker says staff ratings fixed to fit template
Allegations of fixing to fit the stack-ranking curve: 'someone at Google always had to get a low score “of 2.9”, so the unit could match the bell curve. She said senior staff “calibrated” the ratings supplied by line managers to ensure conformity with the template and these calibrations could reduce a line manager’s assessment of an employee, in effect giving them the poisoned score of less than three.'
stack-ranking  google  ireland  employment  work  bell-curve  statistics  eric-schmidt 
march 2014 by jm

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