jm + embedded-systems   4

Remote Code Execution on the Smiths Medical Medfusion 4000 Infusion Pump
'Between March and June of 2017 I spent around 400 hours of personal time analyzing the Smiths Medical Medfusion 4000 infusion pump for security vulnerabilities. The devices analyzed had software versions 1.1.2 and 1.5.0. The flaws discovered (the most critical of which was a DHCP buffer overflow in the MQX operating system used) were disclosed in a coordinated fashion and are detailed by ICS-CERT in ICSMA-250-02A and CERT in VU#590639.

The goal of this exercise was to help protect patients that rely on therapy provided by the pump, to raise awareness of the risk present in unpatched versions of the device, and, finally, to contribute to the corpus of embedded/IoT security research.'
medical  infusion-pumps  security  iot  safety  exploits  embedded-systems  reversing 
january 2018 by jm
Arduino Tutorial
Ladyada's intro to electronics and microcontrollers using Arduino. Some day I'll get around to refreshing my memory, it's been years since I fiddled with a resistor ;)
electronics  arduino  hardware  gadgets  learning  tutorial  microcontrollers  embedded-systems  ladyada 
july 2014 by jm
Belkin managed to put their firmware update private key in the distribution
'The firmware updates are encrypted using GPG, which is intended to prevent this issue. Unfortunately, Belkin misuses the GPG asymmetric encryption functionality, forcing it to distribute the firmware-signing key within the WeMo firmware image. Most likely, Belkin intended to use the symmetric encryption with a signature and a shared public key ring. Attackers could leverage the current implementation to easily sign firmware images.'

Using GPG to sign your firmware updates: yay. Accidentally leaving the private key in the distribution: sad trombone.
fail  wemo  belkin  firmware  embedded-systems  security  updates  distribution  gpg  crypto  public-key  pki  home-automation  ioactive 
february 2014 by jm
Toyota's killer firmware: Bad design and its consequences
This is exactly what you do NOT want to read about embedded systems controlling acceleration in your car:

The Camry electronic throttle control system code was found to have 11,000 global variables. Barr described the code as “spaghetti.” Using the Cyclomatic Complexity metric, 67 functions were rated untestable (meaning they scored more than 50). The throttle angle function scored more than 100 (unmaintainable).
Toyota loosely followed the widely adopted MISRA-C coding rules but Barr’s group found 80,000 rule violations. Toyota's own internal standards make use of only 11 MISRA-C rules, and five of those were violated in the actual code. MISRA-C:1998, in effect when the code was originally written, has 93 required and 34 advisory rules. Toyota nailed six of them. Barr also discovered inadequate and untracked peer code reviews and the absence of any bug-tracking system at Toyota.


On top of this, there was no error-correcting RAM in use; stack-killing recursive code; a quoted 94% stack usage; risks of unintentional RTOS task shutdown; buffer overflows; unsafe casting; race conditions; unchecked error code return values; and a trivial watchdog timer check. Crappy, unsafe coding.
firmware  horror  embedded-systems  toyota  camry  safety  acceleration  misra-c  coding  code-verification  spaghetti-code  cyclomatic-complexity  realtime  rtos  c  code-reviews  bug-tracking  quality 
october 2013 by jm

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