jm + electronics   6

Here’s Why Juicero’s Press is So Expensive – Bolt Blog
Our usual advice to hardware founders is to focus on getting a product to market to test the core assumptions on actual target customers, and then iterate. Instead, Juicero spent $120M over two years to build a complex supply chain and perfectly engineered product that is too expensive for their target demographic.

Imagine a world where Juicero raised only $10M and built a product subject to significant constraints. Maybe the Press wouldn’t be so perfectly engineered but it might have a fewer features and cost a fraction of the original $699. Or maybe with a more iterative approach, they would have quickly found that customers vary greatly in their juice consumption patterns, and would have chosen a per-pack pricing model rather than one-size-fits-all $35/week subscription. Suddenly Juicero is incredibly compelling as a product offering, at least to this consumer.
juicero  design  electronics  hardware  products  startups  engineering  teardowns 
april 2017 by jm
Inside China's Memefacturing Factories, Where The Hottest New Gadgets Are Made - BuzzFeed News
On a humid afternoon, Zhou went shopping for some of those very parts at a Bao An market. As he pulled his maroon minivan into a crowded parking lot, the full scale of Depu Electronics came into view: a three-story concrete behemoth roughly bigger than a Costco and roughly smaller than the Pentagon. Inside, it looked like the world’s largest Radio Shack going out of business sale: an endless series of booths with cables and circuit boards and plugs and ports and buttons and machines piled so high on tables that the faces of the clerks who were selling them were hidden from view. Each booth seemed to argue: We have exactly what you want and we have enough of it for all of your customers. Short of motorized wheels and molding, the market offered nearly everything an ambitious factory owner would need to build a hoverboard, just waiting to be bought, assembled, and shipped.
hoverboards  memes  china  manufacturing  future  gadgets  tat  bao-an  electronics 
november 2015 by jm
Vegemite May Power The Electronics Of The Future
Professor Marc in het Panhuis at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science figured out that you can 3D print the paste and use it to carry current, effectively creating Vegemite bio-wires. What does this mean? Soon you can run electricity through your food. “The iconic Australian Vegemite is ideal for 3D printing edible electronics,” said the professor. “It contains water so it’s not a solid and can easily be extruded using a 3D printer. Also, it’s salty, so it conducts electricity.”


I'm sure the same applies for Marmite...
vegemite  marmite  3d-printing  electronics  bread  food  silly 
august 2015 by jm
Arduino Tutorial
Ladyada's intro to electronics and microcontrollers using Arduino. Some day I'll get around to refreshing my memory, it's been years since I fiddled with a resistor ;)
electronics  arduino  hardware  gadgets  learning  tutorial  microcontrollers  embedded-systems  ladyada 
july 2014 by jm
Yuri Suzuki: London Underground circuit map radio
Japanese designer yuri suzuki has sent designboom images of his 'london underground circuit maps' project developed as part of the designers in residence program at the london design museum, on show until january 13th, 2013. responding to 'thrift' as a theme, suzuki's work explores communication systems in consumer electronics.
a printed circuit board (PCB) is used as a precedent for developing a electrical circuit influenced by harry beck's iconic
london underground map diagrams. by strategically positioning certain speaker, resistor and battery components throughout the map,
users can visually understand the complex networks associated with electricity and how power is generated within a radio.


Beautifully done (via jwz.)
electronics  london  art  design  underground  travel  yuri-suzuki  circuitry 
september 2012 by jm
The Reverse Geocache Puzzle Box
this is fantastic -- a (physical) puzzle, which must be brought to a specific location on the planet to be opened
geocaching  cool  electronics  geolocation  gps  hardware  puzzles  arduino  from delicious
september 2010 by jm

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