jm + dynamodb   18

Amazon DynamoDB Accelerator (DAX)
Amazon DynamoDB Accelerator (DAX) is a fully managed, highly available, in-memory cache for DynamoDB that delivers up to a 10x performance improvement – from milliseconds to microseconds – even at millions of requests per second. DAX does all the heavy lifting required to add in-memory acceleration to your DynamoDB tables, without requiring developers to manage cache invalidation, data population, or cluster management.


No latency percentile figures, unfortunately. Also still in preview.
amazon  dynamodb  aws  dax  performance  storage  databases  latency  low-latency 
april 2017 by jm
atlassian/localstack: A fully functional local AWS cloud stack. Develop and test your cloud apps offline!
LocalStack provides an easy-to-use test/mocking framework for developing Cloud applications. Currently, the focus is primarily on supporting the AWS cloud stack.

LocalStack spins up the following core Cloud APIs on your local machine:

API Gateway at http://localhost:4567;
Kinesis at http://localhost:4568;
DynamoDB at http://localhost:4569;
DynamoDB Streams at http://localhost:4570;
Elasticsearch at http://localhost:4571;
S3 at http://localhost:4572;
Firehose at http://localhost:4573;
Lambda at http://localhost:4574;
SNS at http://localhost:4575;
SQS at http://localhost:4576

Additionally, LocalStack provides a powerful set of tools to interact with the cloud services, including a fully featured KCL Kinesis client with Python binding, simple setup/teardown integration for nosetests, as well as an Environment abstraction that allows to easily switch between local and remote Cloud execution.
aws  emulation  mocking  services  testing  dynamodb  s3 
march 2017 by jm
Segment.com on cost savings using DynamoDB, autoscaling and ECS
great post.

1. DynamoDB hot shards were a big problem -- and it is terrible that diagnosing this requires a ticket to AWS support! This heat map should be a built-in feature.

2. ECS auto-scaling gets a solid thumbs-up.

3. Switching from ELB to ALB lets them set ports dynamically for individual ECS Docker containers, and then pack as many containers as will fit on a giant EC2 instance.

4. Terraform modules to automate setup and maintainance of ECS, autoscaling groups, and ALBs
terraform  segment  architecture  aws  dynamodb  alb  elb  asg  ecs  docker 
march 2017 by jm
Manage DynamoDB Items Using Time to Live (TTL)
good call.
Many DynamoDB users store data that has a limited useful life or is accessed less frequently over time. Some of them track recent logins, trial subscriptions, or application metrics. Others store data that is subject to regulatory or contractual limitations on how long it can be stored. Until now, these customers implemented their own time-based data management. At scale, this sometimes meant that they ran a couple of Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances that did nothing more than scan DynamoDB items, check date attributes, and issue delete requests for items that were no longer needed. This added cost and complexity to their application. In order to streamline this popular and important use case, we are launching a new Time to Live (TTL) feature today. You can enable this feature on a table-by-table basis, specifying an item attribute that contains the expiration time for the item.
dynamodb  ttl  storage  aws  architecture  expiry 
february 2017 by jm
Dynalite
Awesome new mock DynamoDB implementation:
An implementation of Amazon's DynamoDB, focussed on correctness and performance, and built on LevelDB (well, @rvagg's awesome LevelUP to be precise). This project aims to match the live DynamoDB instances as closely as possible (and is tested against them in various regions), including all limits and error messages.

Why not Amazon's DynamoDB Local? Because it's too buggy! And it differs too much from the live instances in a number of key areas.


We use DynamoDBLocal in our tests -- the availability of that tool is one of the key reasons we have adopted Dynamo so heavily, since we can safely test our code properly with it. This looks even better.
dynamodb  testing  unit-tests  integration-testing  tests  ops  dynalite  aws  leveldb 
november 2015 by jm
The Totally Managed Analytics Pipeline: Segment, Lambda, and Dynamo
notable mainly for the details of Terraform support for Lambda: that's a significant improvement to Lambda's production-readiness
aws  pipelines  data  streaming  lambda  dynamodb  analytics  terraform  ops 
october 2015 by jm
Summary of the Amazon DynamoDB Service Disruption and Related Impacts in the US-East Region
Painful to read, but: tl;dr: monitoring oversight, followed by a transient network glitch triggering IPC timeouts, which increased load due to lack of circuit breakers, creating a cascading failure
aws  postmortem  outages  dynamodb  ec2  post-mortems  circuit-breakers  monitoring 
september 2015 by jm
danilop/runjop · GitHub
RunJOP (Run Just Once Please) is a distributed execution framework to run a command (i.e. a job) only once in a group of servers [built using AWS DynamoDB and S3].


nifty! Distributed cron is pretty easy when you've got Dynamo doing the heavy lifting.
dynamodb  cron  distributed-cron  scheduling  runjop  danilop  hacks  aws  ops 
july 2015 by jm
0x74696d | Falling In And Out Of Love with DynamoDB, Part II
Good DynamoDB real-world experience post, via Mitch Garnaat. We should write up ours, although it's pretty scary-stuff-free by comparison
aws  dynamodb  storage  databases  architecture  ops 
february 2015 by jm
AWS re:Invent 2014 | (SPOT302) Under the Covers of AWS: Its Core Distributed Systems - YouTube
This is a really solid talk -- not surprising, alv@ is one of the speakers!
"AWS and Amazon.com operate some of the world's largest distributed systems infrastructure and applications. In our past 18 years of operating this infrastructure, we have come to realize that building such large distributed systems to meet the durability, reliability, scalability, and performance needs of AWS requires us to build our services using a few common distributed systems primitives. Examples of these primitives include a reliable method to build consensus in a distributed system, reliable and scalable key-value store, infrastructure for a transactional logging system, scalable database query layers using both NoSQL and SQL APIs, and a system for scalable and elastic compute infrastructure.

In this session, we discuss some of the solutions that we employ in building these primitives and our lessons in operating these systems. We also cover the history of some of these primitives -- DHTs, transactional logging, materialized views and various other deep distributed systems concepts; how their design evolved over time; and how we continue to scale them to AWS. "


Slides: http://www.slideshare.net/AmazonWebServices/spot302-under-the-covers-of-aws-core-distributed-systems-primitives-that-power-our-platform-aws-reinvent-2014
scale  scaling  aws  amazon  dht  logging  data-structures  distcomp  via:marc-brooker  dynamodb  s3 
november 2014 by jm
DynamoDB Streams
This is pretty awesome. All changes to a DynamoDB table can be streamed to a Kinesis stream, MySQL-replication-style.

The nice bit is that it has a solid way to ensure readers won't get overwhelmed by the stream volume (since ddb tables are IOPS-rate-limited), and Kinesis has a solid way to read missed updates (since it's a Kafka-style windowed persistent stream). With this you have a pretty reliable way to ensure you're not going to suffer data loss.
iops  dynamodb  aws  kinesis  reliability  replication  multi-az  multi-region  failover  streaming  kafka 
november 2014 by jm
Use of Formal Methods at Amazon Web Services
Chris Newcombe, Marc Brooker, et al. writing about their experience using formal specification and model-checking languages (TLA+) in production in AWS:

The success with DynamoDB gave us enough evidence to present TLA+ to the broader engineering community at Amazon. This raised a challenge; how to convey the purpose and benefits of formal methods to an audience of software engineers? Engineers think in terms of debugging rather than ‘verification’, so we called the presentation “Debugging Designs”.

Continuing that metaphor, we have found that software engineers more readily grasp the concept and practical value of TLA+ if we dub it 'Exhaustively-testable pseudo-code'.

We initially avoid the words ‘formal’, ‘verification’, and ‘proof’, due to the widespread view that formal methods are impractical. We also initially avoid mentioning what the acronym ‘TLA’ stands for, as doing so would give an incorrect impression of complexity.


More slides at http://tla2012.loria.fr/contributed/newcombe-slides.pdf ; proggit discussion at http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/277fbh/use_of_formal_methods_at_amazon_web_services/
formal-methods  model-checking  tla  tla+  programming  distsys  distcomp  ebs  s3  dynamodb  aws  ec2  marc-brooker  chris-newcombe 
june 2014 by jm
AWS SDK for Java Client Configuration
turns out the AWS SDK has lots of tuning knobs: region selection, socket buffer sizes, and debug logging (including wire logging).
aws  sdk  java  logging  ec2  s3  dynamodb  sockets  tuning 
june 2014 by jm
DynamoDB Local
'a client-side database that supports the complete DynamoDB API, but doesn't manipulate any tables or data in DynamoDB itself. You can write code while sitting in a tree, on the beach, or in the desert. When you are ready to deploy your application, you simply instruct it to connect to the actual DynamoDB endpoint. No other modifications will be needed.'

This is good -- an in-memory data store for integration testing is absolutely vital for production usage. (Voldemort does this well, for example.)
dynamodb  aws  ec2  testing  integration-testing  unit-tests 
september 2013 by jm
Under the Covers of DynamoDB
mostly a DynamoDB puff-piece from last week's Amazon Cloud Connect, but contains some good real-world figures for a 20-billion-GUID deduping table use-case at end. ($4,150 per month, to cut to the chase)
dynamodb  aws  figures  costs  architecture  ec2  dedupe  cloud-connect  slides 
april 2013 by jm

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