jm + dsl   4

The Configuration Complexity Clock
This, so much this.....
Frustratingly there are still some business requirements that can’t be configured using the new [post-config-file] rules engine. Some logical conditions simply aren’t configurable using its GUI, and so the application has to be re-coded and re-deployed for some scenarios. Help is at hand, someone on the team reads Ayende’s DSLs book. Yes, a DSL will allow us to write arbitrarily complex rules and solve all our problems. The team stops work for several months to implement the DSL. It’s a considerable technical accomplishment when it’s completed and everyone takes a well earned break. Surely this will mean the end of arbitrary hard-coded business logic? It’s now 9am on the clock.

Amazingly it works. Several months go by without any changes being needed in the core application. The team spend most of their time writing code in the new DSL. After some embarrassing episodes, they now go through a complete release cycle before deploying any new DSL code. The DSL text files are version controlled and each release goes through regression testing before being deployed. Debugging the DSL code is difficult, there’s little tooling support, they simply don’t have the resources to build an IDE or a ReSharper for their new little language. As the DSL code gets more complex they also start to miss being able to write object-oriented software. Some of the team have started to work on a unit testing framework in their spare time.

In the pub after work someone quips, “we’re back where we started four years ago, hard coding everything, except now in a much crappier language.”


(via Oisin)
configuration  scripting  dsls  script  config  rules-engines  rules  via:oisin  dsl  coding  hard-coding 
5 weeks ago by jm
It's official, ADSL works over wet string
So, there you go, ADSL over 2m of literal "wet string". Well done all for testing this. It shows the importance of handling faults that seem to just be "low speed".
adsl  faults  hacks  funny  networking  dsl  telecoms 
december 2017 by jm
BPF - the forgotten bytecode
'In essence Tcpdump asks the kernel to execute a BPF program within the kernel context. This might sound risky, but actually isn't. Before executing the BPF bytecode kernel ensures that it's safe:

* All the jumps are only forward, which guarantees that there aren't any loops in the BPF program. Therefore it must terminate.
* All instructions, especially memory reads are valid and within range.
* The single BPF program has less than 4096 instructions.

All this guarantees that the BPF programs executed within kernel context will run fast and will never infinitely loop. That means the BPF programs are not Turing complete, but in practice they are expressive enough for the job and deal with packet filtering very well.'

Good example of a carefully-designed DSL allowing safe "programs" to be written and executed in a privileged context without security risk, or risk of running out of control.
coding  dsl  security  via:oisin  linux  tcpdump  bpf  bsd  kernel  turing-complete  configuration  languages 
may 2014 by jm
The things make got right (and how to make it better)
jgc provides a good demonstration of how a general-purpose programming language tends to make a crappy DSL -- specifically Rakefiles
dsl  build  make  coding  jgc  languages  configuration  makefiles  rake  ruby  from delicious
january 2011 by jm

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