jm + dri   14

Journalists, this GSOC story isn’t all about you, you know
Karlin Lillington in the Irish Times, going through journos for a shortcut:
All the hand-wringing from journalists, unions and media companies – even politicians and ministers – over the GSOC’s accessing of journalist’s call records? Oh, please. What wilful ignorance, mixed with blatant hypocrisy. Where have you all been for the past decade and a half, as successive Irish governments and ministers for justice supported and then rammed through legislation for mandatory call data retention for one of the longest periods in the world, with some of the weakest legal constraints and oversight?
karlin-lillington  privacy  data-protection  dri  law  journalists  gsoc  surveillance  data-retention 
january 2016 by jm
Government forum to discuss increasing use of personal data
Mr Murphy said it was the Government’s objective for Ireland to be a leader on data protection and data-related issues.
The members of the forum include Data Protection Commissioner Helen Dixon, John Barron, chief technology officer with the Revenue Commissioners, Seamus Carroll, head of civil law reform division at the Department of Justice and Tim Duggan, assistant secretary with the Department of Social Protection.
Gary Davis, director of privacy and law enforcement requests with Apple, is also on the forum. Mr Davis is a former deputy data protection commissioner in Ireland.
There are also representatives from Google, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook, from the IDA, the Law Society and the National Statistics Board.
Chair of Digital Rights Ireland Dr TJ McIntyre and Dr Eoin O’Dell, associate professor, School of Law, Trinity College Dublin are also on the voluntary forum.
ireland  government  dri  law  privacy  data  data-protection  dpc 
july 2015 by jm
Pub Table Quiz - In Aid of Digital Rights Ireland
Jason Roe is organising a Table Quiz in Dublin on March 26th to support fundraising efforts by Digital Rights Ireland. We will supply tables, questions and a ready supply of beer and maybe finger food.
dri  pub-quiz  fun  dublin  quizzes 
march 2015 by jm
Digital Rights Ireland announces its first conference!
Digital Rights Europe, Wednesday, April 15th in Dublin. deadly!
digital-rights  ireland  dri  privacy  data-protection  europe  eu 
february 2015 by jm
DRI’s Unchanged Position on Eircode
'Broadly, they are satisfied with what we are doing'

versus:

'We have deep concerns about the Eircode initiative… We want to state clearly that we are not at all ‘satisfied’ with the postcode that has been designed or the implementation proposals.'
dri  ireland  eircode  postcodes  privacy  data-protection  quotes  misrepresentation 
january 2015 by jm
Group warns of postcode project dangers | Irish Examiner
“We have spoken to the National Consumer Agency, logistics companies and Digital Rights Ireland, with which we have had an indepth conversation to see if there is anything in the proposal that might be considered to have an impact on anyone’s privacy. Broadly, they are satisfied with what we are doing,” [Patricia Cronin, head of the Department of Communications’ postcodes division] told the committee.

However in his letter, [DRI's] O’Lachtnain said the group “want to state clearly that we are not at all ‘satisfied’ with the postcode that has been designed or the implementation proposals”.


Some nerve!
dri  nca  privacy  patricia-cronin  goverment  postcodes  eircode  dpc  ireland 
january 2015 by jm
Digital Rights Ireland files Amicus Brief in Microsoft v USA with Liberty and ORG
Microsoft -v- USA is an important ongoing case, currently listed for hearing in 2015 before the US Federal Court of Appeal of the 2nd Circuit.

However, as the case centres around the means by which NY law enforcement are seeking to access data of an email account which resides in Dublin, it is also crucially significant to Ireland and the rest of the EU. For that reason, Digital Rights Ireland instructed us to file an Amicus Brief in the US case, in conjunction with the global law firm of White & Case, who have acted pro bono in their representation.

Given the significance of the case for the wider EU, both Liberty and the Open Rights Group in the UK have joined Digital Rights Ireland as amici on this brief. We hope it will be of aid to the US court in assessing the significance of the order being appealed by Microsoft for EU citizens and European states, in the light of the existing US and EU Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty.
amicus-briefs  law  us  dri  microsoft  mlats  org  liberty  eu  privacy 
december 2014 by jm
Irish parliament pressing ahead with increased access to retained telecoms data
While much of the new bill is concerned with the dissolution of the Competition Authority and the National Consumer Agency and the formation of a new merged Competition and Consumer Protection Commission (CCPC) the new bill also proposed to extend the powers of the new CCPC to help it investigate serious anticompetitive behaviour.

Strikingly the new bill proposes to give members of the CCPC the power to access data retained under the Communications (Retention of Data) Act 2011. As readers will recall this act implements Directive 2006/24/EC which obliges telecommunications companies to archive traffic and location data for a period of up to two years to facilitate the investigation of serious crime.

Ireland chose to implement the maximum two year retention period and provided access to An Garda Siochana, The Defence Forces and the Revenue Commissioners. The current reform of Irish competition law now proposes to extend data access powers to the members of the CCPC for the purposes of investigating cartel offences.
data-retention  privacy  surveillance  competition  ccpc  ireland  law  dri 
july 2014 by jm
DRI wins their case at the ECJ!
Great stuff!
The Court has found that data retention “entails a wide-ranging and particularly serious interference with the fundamental rights to respect for private life and to the protection of personal data” and that it “entails an interference with the fundamental rights of practically the entire European population”. TJ McIntyre, Chairman of Digital Rights Ireland, said that “This is the first assessment of mass surveillance by a supreme court since the Snowden revelations. The ECJ’s judgement finds that untargeted monitoring of the entire population is unacceptable in a democratic society.”

[...] Though the Directive has now been struck down, the issue will remain live in all the countries who have passed domestic law to implement the data retention mass surveillance regime. Digital Rights Ireland’s challenge to the Irish data retention system will return to the High Court in Dublin for the next phase of litigation.
dri  digital-rights  ireland  eu  ecj  surveillance  snooping  law  data-retention 
april 2014 by jm
We need your help to keep working for European digital rights in 2014
Grim. DRI are facing a 5-figure legal bill from the music industry - they need your donations to avoid shutdown
donations  dri  funding  amicus-curiae  law  ireland  digital-rights-ireland  emi  irma 
january 2014 by jm
Karlin Lillington on DRI's looming victory in the European Court of Justice
If the full European Court of Justice (ECJ) accepts the opinion of its advocate general in a final ruling due early next year – and it almost always does – it will prove a huge vindication of Ireland’s small privacy advocacy group, Digital Rights Ireland (DRI).
Its case against Irish retention laws, which began in 2006, forms the basis of this broader David v Goliath challenge and initial opinion.
The advocate general’s advice largely upholds the key concerns put forward by DRI against Ireland’s laws. Withholding so much data about every citizen, including children, in case someone commits a future crime, is too intrusive into private life, and could allow authorities to create a “faithful and exhaustive map of a large portion of a person’s [private] conduct”.
Retained data is so comprehensive that they could easily reveal private identities, which are supposed to remain anonymous. And the data, entrusted to third parties, is at too much risk of fraudulent or malicious use.
Cruz Villalón argues that there must be far greater oversight to the retention process, and controls on access to data, and that citizens should have the right to be notified after the fact if their data has been scrutinised. The Irish Government had repeatedly waved off such concerns from Digital Rights Ireland in the past.
dri  rights  ireland  internet  surveillance  data-retention  privacy  eu  ecj  law 
december 2013 by jm
DRI needs your help
Appalled by mass surveillance scandals? So are we. We’re doing something about it – and you can too.

In 2006 we started a case challenging Irish and European laws that require your mobile phone company and ISP to monitor your location, your calls, your texts and your emails and to store that information for up to two years. That case has now made it to the European Court of Justice and will be heard on July 9th. If we are successful, it will strike down these laws for all of Europe and will declare illegal this type of mass surveillance of the entire population.

Here’s where you come in. You can take part by: making a donation to help us pay for the expenses we incur; following our updates and keeping abreast of the issues; spreading the word on social media.

With your help, we can strike a blow for the privacy of all citizens.
activism  privacy  politics  ireland  dri  digital-rights  data-protection  data-retention 
june 2013 by jm
Digital Rights Ireland blog post on the secret internet-filtering plans
'it becomes clear that for some time now the Department of Justice has been proposing the introduction of internet blocking in Ireland – and has been doing this under the radar, without any public consultation or legislative approval. Indeed, it is clear from the list that the Department is not planning on introducing legislation but instead intends to introduce this new form of censorship without any legal basis, based on the now discredited Norwegian and Danish models.' This is very bad news indeed
ireland  censorship  filtering  internet  great-firewall  dri  politics  freedom  from delicious
april 2010 by jm
Putting up barriers to a free and open internet - The Irish Times
Ireland's Dept of Justice is investigating setting up a "Great Firewall" filtering the country's internet, a la China and Australia. “Blocking involves censorship taken on no legal basis. There is no judge, no jury and no right to be heard if you are blocked,” says [DRI's TJ] McIntyre. “The chances are it also will be used in unaccountable ways by unaccountable organisations.”
blocking  censorship  government  internet  ireland  dri  filtering  great-firewall  from delicious
april 2010 by jm

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