jm + domains   12

IBM broke its cloud by letting three domain names expire - The Register
“multiple domain names were mistakenly allowed to expire and were in hold status.”
outages  fail  ibm  the-register  ops  dns  domains  cloud 
29 days ago by jm
World’s first vanity gTLD goes live
".richardli". TLDs are now officially beyond a joke
tld  absurd  fail  gtlds  domains  dns  vanity  richard-li 
may 2016 by jm
Why We Will Not Be Registering easyDNS.SUCKS - blog.easydns.org
If you're not immersed in the naming business you may find the jargon in it hard to understand. The basic upshot is this: the IPC believes that the mechanisms that were enacted to protect trademark holders during the deluge of new TLD rollouts are being gamed by the .SUCKS TLD operator to extort inflated fees from trademark holders.


(via Nelson)
shakedown  business  internet  domains  dns  easydns  dot-sucks  scams  tlds  trademarks  ip 
april 2015 by jm
OS X doesn't support 'ndots' DNS resolution
"ping foo.bar" will not append the "search" domains configured in /etc/resolv.conf. Apparently this has been broken since OS X Lion, no sign of a fix. Nice work Apple
apple  fail  bugs  resolv  dns  domains  osx 
november 2014 by jm
#BPjMleak
'Leak of the secret German Internet Censorship URL blacklist BPjM-Modul'.

Turns out there's a blocklist of adult-only or prohibited domains issued by a German government department, The Federal Department for Media Harmful to Young Persons (German: "Bundesprüfstelle für jugendgefährdende Medien" or BPjM), issued in the form of a list of hashes of those domains. These were extracted from an AVM router, then the hashes were brute forced using several other plaintext URL blocklists and domain lists.

Needless to say, there's an assortment of silly false positives, such as the listing of the website for the 1997 3D Realms game "Shadow Warrior": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shadow_Warrior
hashes  reversing  reverse-engineering  germany  german  bpjm  filtering  blocklists  blacklists  avm  domains  censorship  fps 
july 2014 by jm
Nominet now filtering .uk domain registrations for 'sex-crime content'
Amazing. Massive nanny-stateism of the 'something must be done' variety, with a 100% false-alarm hit rate, and it's now policy.
'Nominet have made a decision, based on a report by Lord Macdonald QC, that recommends that they check any domain registration that signals sex crime content or is in itself a sex crime. This is screening of domains within 48 hours of registration, and de-registration. The report says that such domains should be reported to the police.' [....]

'The report itself states [...] that in 2013 Nominet checked domains for key words used by the IWF, and as a result reported tens of thousands of domains to IWF for checking, all of which were false positives. Not one was, in fact, related to child sex abuse.'
filtering  nominet  false-positives  nanny-state  uk  sex-crimes  false-alarms  domains  iwf 
january 2014 by jm
DNS registrars that complied with "shakedown" anti-piracy requests may now be in violation of ICANN Transfers Policy
According to EasyDNS:
Any registrar that has taken one of these sites offline that now impedes the registrants of those domains from simply getting their domain names out of there and back online somewhere else will then be subject to the TDRP – Transfer Dispute Resolution Policy and if they lose (which they will) they will be subject to TDRP fees assesed by the registry operator, and to quote the TDRP itself "Transfer dispute resolution fees can be substantial".
This is why it is never a good idea to just react to pressure in the face of obnoxious bluster – in the very act of trying to diffuse any perceived culpability you end up opening yourself to real liability.
tdrp  easydns  dns  registrars  domains  piracy  law  due-process 
october 2013 by jm
Confusion reigns over three “hijacked” ccTLDs
This kind of silliness is only likely to increase as the number of TLDs increases (and they become more trivial).
What seems to be happening here is that [two companies involved] have had some kind of dispute, and that as a result the registrants and the reputation of three countries’ ccTLDs have been harmed. Very amateurish.
tlds  domains  via:fanf  amateur-hour  dns  cctlds  registrars  adamsnames 
march 2013 by jm
Verisign seizes .com domain registered via foreign Registrar on behalf of US Authorities.
'at the end of the day what has happened is that US law (in fact, Maryland state law) as been imposed on a .com domain [specifically gambling site bodog.com] operating outside the USA, which is the subtext we were very worried about when we commented on SOPA. Even though SOPA is currently in limbo, the reality that US law can now be asserted over all domains registered under .com, .net, org, .biz and maybe .info (Afilias is headquartered in Ireland by operates out of the US). This is no longer a doom-and-gloom theory by some guy in a tin foil hat. It just happened.'
via:joshea  internet  legal  policy  public  sopa  domains  dns  verisign  seizure 
february 2012 by jm
U.S. Government Shuts Down 84,000 Websites, ‘By Mistake’ | TorrentFreak
DHS/ICE domain seizures suffer a serious false positive problem, resulting in the seizure and shutting down of 84,000 subdomains of a free DNS provider, replacing them with a banner accusing the site of trafficking in child porn. whoops!
dhs  ice  censorship  internet  domains  dns  seizure  false-positives  child-porn  from delicious
february 2011 by jm
The Background Dope on DHS Recent Seizure of Domains
according to this, the US Dept of Homeland Security is "seizing" domains through a back-channel to Verisign, since they directly control the .com TLD's nameservers. Expect to see dodgy sites start using non-US TLDs, names in multiple TLDs a la Pirate Bay, and eventually IPs instead of DNS records
tlds  dns  security  dhs  seizure  domains  cctlds  filesharing  icann  immixgroup  from delicious
december 2010 by jm
UTS #46: Unicode IDNA Compatibility Processing
'Client software, such as browsers and emailers, faces a difficult transition from the version of international domain names approved in 2003 (IDNA2003), to the revision approved in 2010 (IDNA2008). The specification in this document provides a mechanism that minimizes the impact of this transition for client software, allowing client software to access domains that are valid under either system.' wow, this is hairy stuff
idn  unicode  domains  interop  from delicious
october 2010 by jm

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