jm + digital   6

In The 2010s, We All Became Alienated By Technology
Looking back from the shaky edge of a new decade, it’s clear that the past 10 years saw many Americans snap out of this dream, shaken awake by a brutal series of shocks and dislocations from the very changes that were supposed to "create a civilization of the Mind in Cyberspace.” When they opened their eyes, they did indeed see that the Digital Nation had been born. Only it hadn’t set them free. They were being ruled by it. It hadn’t tamed politics. It sent them berserk. And it hadn’t brought people closer together. It had alienated them.
alienation  wired  future  2010s  america  tech  silicon-valley  internet  history  digital  cyberspace 
9 weeks ago by jm
James Bridle / New Ways of Seeing
This will be a must-listen, starting this week on BBC Radio 4 and for download:

'New Ways of Seeing considers the impact of digital technologies on the way we see, understand, and interact with the world. Building on John Berger's seminal Ways of Seeing from 1972, the show explores network infrastructures, digital images, systemic bias, education and the environment, in conversation with a number of contemporary art practitioners.'
seeing  vision  machine-learning  james-bridle  internet  digital  future  art 
april 2019 by jm
"The first AI portrait in Christie’s" was mostly output from someone else's open-source code
The print was created by Obvious, a trio of 25-year-old French students whose goal is to “explain and democratize” AI through art. Over the past year, they’ve made a series of portraits depicting members of the fictional Belamy family, amplifying their work through attention-grabbing press releases. But insiders say the code used to generate these prints is mostly the work of another artist and programmer: 19-year-old Robbie Barrat, a recent high school graduate who shared his algorithms online via an open-source license.

The members of Obvious don’t deny that they borrowed substantially from Barrat’s code, but until recently, they didn’t publicize that fact either. This has created unease for some members of the AI art community, which is open and collaborative and taking its first steps into mainstream attention.[...]

Jason Bailey, a digital art blogger who runs the site Artnome, says that what Obvious has done is far from unusual. “It’s almost weekly in digital art that someone takes some open code and tweaks it and sells it,” he tells The Verge. But the prominence of this auction and the fact that Obvious, not Barrat, has received the attendant prestige and attention does complicate the matter. “There’s a lot of stuff you can do that’s legal, but that makes you sort of a jerk,” adds Bailey. “If I was Robbie, I’d be pretty miffed, and Obvious said they owe him a great deal of credit.”
Barrat says he holds no grudges at all and is mostly annoyed that the auction might give outsiders the wrong impression about AI art. “I’m more concerned about the fact that actual artists using AI are being deprived of the spotlight,” he says. “It’s a very bad first impression for the field to have.”
ai  art  graphics  history  open-source  ownership  copyright  obvious  robbie-barrat  digital 
october 2018 by jm
The Impossible Music of Black MIDI
excellently bananas. 8.49 million separate musical notes in a single 4-minute-long composition (via Paddy Benson)
music  hardcore  black-midi  midi  composition  halp  digital  via:pbenson 
october 2013 by jm
Conor O'Neill on his freesat/DTT system
'Our replacement for Sky TV cost €99. Ariva 120. No monthly fees!' -- sounds very intriguing, that's a good price point
digital  fta  satellite  television  dtt  sky  upc  ireland 
september 2011 by jm
VT220 terminal hooked up to a 2010-era Mac Pro
with picture. WAAAAAANT despite the sheer massive impracticality of it. I still love VT*20 terminals....
unix  vt220  mac  terminal  dec  digital  retro 
august 2011 by jm

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