jm + ddos   14

The Mirai Botnet Was Part of a College Student Minecraft Scheme
The truth, as made clear in that Alaskan courtroom Friday — and unsealed by the Justice Department on Wednesday—was even stranger: The brains behind Mirai were a 21-year-old Rutgers college student from suburban New Jersey and his two college-age friends from outside Pittsburgh and New Orleans. All three—Paras Jha, Josiah White, and Dalton Norman, respectively—admitted their role in creating and launching Mirai into the world.

Originally, prosecutors say, the defendants hadn’t intended to bring down the internet—they had been trying to gain an advantage in the computer game Minecraft. “They didn’t realize the power they were unleashing,” says FBI supervisory special agent Bill Walton. "This was the Manhattan Project."


(via Nelson)
minecraft  botnets  mirai  security  rutgers  ddos 
2 days ago by jm
Brian Krebs - The Democratization of Censorship
Events of the past week have convinced me that one of the fastest-growing censorship threats on the Internet today comes not from nation-states, but from super-empowered individuals who have been quietly building extremely potent cyber weapons with transnational reach. More than 20 years after Gilmore first coined [his] turn of phrase, his most notable quotable has effectively been inverted — “Censorship can in fact route around the Internet.” The Internet can’t route around censorship when the censorship is all-pervasive and armed with, for all practical purposes, near-infinite reach and capacity.
brian-krebs  censorship  ddos  internet  web  politics  crime  security  iot 
september 2016 by jm
Google Online Security Blog: A Javascript-based DDoS Attack [the Greatfire DDoS] as seen by Safe Browsing
We hope this report helps to round out the overall facts known about this attack. It also demonstrates that collectively there is a lot of visibility into what happens on the web. At the HTTP level seen by Safe Browsing, we cannot confidently attribute this attack to anyone. However, it makes it clear that hiding such attacks from detailed analysis after the fact is difficult.

Had the entire web already moved to encrypted traffic via TLS, such an injection attack would not have been possible. This provides further motivation for transitioning the web to encrypted and integrity-protected communication. Unfortunately, defending against such an attack is not easy for website operators. In this case, the attack Javascript requests web resources sequentially and slowing down responses might have helped with reducing the overall attack traffic. Another hope is that the external visibility of this attack will serve as a deterrent in the future.


Via Nelson.
google  security  via:nelson  ddos  javascript  tls  ssl  safe-browsing  networking  china  greatfire 
april 2015 by jm
China’s Great Cannon
Conducting such a widespread attack clearly demonstrates the weaponization of the Chinese Internet to co-opt arbitrary computers across the web and outside of China to achieve China’s policy ends.  The repurposing of the devices of unwitting users in foreign jurisdictions for covert attacks in the interests of one country’s national priorities is a dangerous precedent — contrary to international norms and in violation of widespread domestic laws prohibiting the unauthorized use of computing and networked systems.
censorship  ddos  internet  security  china  great-cannon  citizen-lab  reports  web 
april 2015 by jm
(SEC307) Building a DDoS-Resilient Architecture with AWS
good slides on a "web application firewall" proxy service, deployable as an auto-scaling EC2 unit
ec2  aws  ddos  security  resilience  slides  reinvent  firewalls  http  elb 
april 2015 by jm
Chinese authorities compromise millions in cyberattacks
"[The] Great Firewall [of China] has switched from being a passive, inbound filter to being an active and aggressive outbound one."
china  great-firewall  censorship  cyberwarfare  github  ddos  baidu  future 
march 2015 by jm
NTP's days are numbered for consumer devices
An accurate clock is required to negotiate SSL/TLS, so clock sync is important for internet-of-things usage. but:
Unfortunately for us, the traditional and most widespread method for clock synchronisation (NTP) has been caught up in a DDoS issue which has recently caused some ISPs to start blocking all NTP communication. [....] Because the DDoS attacks are so widespread, and the lack of obvious commercial pressure to fix the issue, it’s possible that the days of using NTP as a mechanism for setting clocks may well be numbered. Luckily for us there is a small but growing project that replaces it.

tlsdate was started by Jacob Appelbaum of the Tor project in 2012, making use of the SSL handshake in order to extract time from a remote server, and its usage is on the rise. [....] Since we started encountering these problems, we’ve incorporated tlsdate into an over-the-air update, and have successfully started using this in situations where NTP is blocked.
tlsdate  ntp  clocks  time  sync  iot  via:gwire  ddos  isps  internet  protocols  security 
august 2014 by jm
QuakeNet IRC Network- Article - PRESS RELEASE: IRC NETWORKS UNDER SYSTEMATIC ATTACK FROM GOVERNMENTS
QuakeNet are not happy about GCHQ's DDoS attacks against them.
Yesterday we learned ... that GCHQ, the British intelligence agency, are performing persistent social and technological attacks against IRC networks. These attacks are performed without informing the networks and are targeted at users associated with politically motivated movements such as "Anonymous". While QuakeNet does not condone or endorse and actively forbids any illegal activity on its servers we encourage discussion on all topics including political and social commentary. It is apparent now that engaging in such topics with an opinion contrary to that of the intelligence agencies is sufficient to make people a target for monitoring, coercion and denial of access to communications platforms. The ... documents depict GCHQ operatives engaging in social engineering of IRC users to entrap themselves by encouraging the target to leak details about their location as well as wholesale attacks on the IRC servers hosting the network. These attacks bring down the IRC network entirely affecting every user on the network as well as the company hosting the server. The collateral damage and numbers of innocent people and companies affected by these forms of attack can be huge and it is highly illegal in many jurisdictions including the UK under the Computer Misuse Act.
quakenet  ddos  security  gchq  irc  anonymous 
february 2014 by jm
GCHQ slide claiming that they DDoS'd anonymous' IRC servers
Mikko Hypponen: "This makes British Government the only Western government known to have launched DDoS attacks."
ddos  history  security  gchq  dos  anonymous  irc  hacking 
february 2014 by jm
One of CloudFlare's upstream providers on the "death of the internet" scare-mongering
Having a bad day on the Internet is nothing new. These are the types
of events we deal with on a regular basis, and most large network
operators are very good at responding quickly to deal with situations like
this. In our case, we worked with Cloudflare to quickly identify the
attack profile, rolled out global filters on our network to limit the
attack traffic without adversely impacting legitimate users, and worked
with our other partner networks (like NTT) to do the same. If the attacks
had stopped here, nobody in the "mainstream media" would have noticed, and
it would have been just another fun day for a few geeks on the Internet.

The next part is where things got interesting, and is the part that nobody
outside of extremely technical circles has actually bothered to try and
understand yet. After attacking Cloudflare and their upstream Internet
providers directly stopped having the desired effect, the attackers turned
to any other interconnection point they could find, and stumbled upon
Internet Exchange Points like LINX (in London), AMS-IX (in Amsterdam), and
DEC-IX (in Frankfurt), three of the largest IXPs in the world. An IXP is
an "interconnection fabric", or essentially just a large switched LAN,
which acts as a common meeting point for different networks to connect and
exchange traffic with each other. One downside to the way this
architecture works is that there is a single big IP block used at each of
these IXPs, where every network who interconnects is given 1 IP address,
and this IP block CAN be globally routable. When the attackers stumbled
upon this, probably by accident, it resulted in a lot of bogus traffic
being injected into the IXP fabrics in an unusual way, until the IXP
operators were able to work with everyone to make certain the IXP IP
blocks weren't being globally re-advertised.

Note that the vast majority of global Internet traffic does NOT travel
over IXPs, but rather goes via direct private interconnections between
specific networks. The IXP traffic represents more of the "long tail" of
Internet traffic exchange, a larger number of smaller networks, which
collectively still adds up to be a pretty big chunk of traffic. So, what
you actually saw in this attack was a larger number of smaller networks
being affected by something which was an completely unrelated and
unintended side-effect of the actual attacks, and thus *poof* you have the
recipe for a lot of people talking about it. :)

Hopefully that clears up a bit of the situation.
bandwidth  internet  gizmodo  traffic  cloudflare  ddos  hacking 
march 2013 by jm
RTÉ News: CAO website blocked by malicious attack
is the CAO (Ireland's Central Applications Office, for university admissions) being DDOS'd? sounds like it
cao  ddos  security  ireland  from delicious
august 2010 by jm
Did a denial-of-service attack cause the stock-market "flash crash?"
wonderful; our world's economies are now more networked than ever, and vulnerable to the attacks which that enables. Have we learned nothing from the last few years?
networking  internet  ddos  stock-markets  security  from delicious
june 2010 by jm
DDOS mystery involving Linux and mod_ssl
connections to brutus.apache.org, "GET / HTTP/1.1", massive HTTPS DDOS. no idea what's going on
apache  asf  ddos  https  httpd  mod_ssl  from delicious
october 2009 by jm

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: