jm + crowdsourcing   5

Crowdsourcing isn’t broken — Backchannel — Medium
'A great compendium by @harper of techniques for handling trolls and griefers in online communities', via kragen
via:kragen  antispam  filtering  trolls  community  crowdsourcing  threadless  harper  griefers  abuse  tips 
february 2015 by jm
"Man vs Machine: Practical Adversarial Detection of Malicious Crowdsourcing Workers" [paper]
"traditional ML techniques are accurate (95%–99%) in detection but can be highly vulnerable to adversarial attacks". ain't that the truth
security  adversarial-attacks  machine-learning  paper  crowdsourcing  via:kragen 
february 2015 by jm
British Library uploads one million public domain images to the net for remix and reuse - Boing Boing
this is excellent!
The British Library has uploaded one million public domain scans from 17th-19th century books to Flickr! They're embarking on an ambitious programme to crowdsource novel uses and navigation tools for the huge corpus. Already, the manifest of image descriptions is available through Github. This is a remarkable, public spirited, archival project, and the British Library is to be loudly applauded for it!
british-library  libraries  public-domain  art  graphics  images  history  19th-century  17th-century  18th-century  books  crowdsourcing  via:boingboing  github 
december 2013 by jm
How Kaggle Is Changing How We Work - Thomas Goetz - The Atlantic

Founded in 2010, Kaggle is an online platform for data-mining and predictive-modeling competitions. A company arranges with Kaggle to post a dump of data with a proposed problem, and the site's community of computer scientists and mathematicians -- known these days as data scientists -- take on the task, posting proposed solutions.

[...] On one level, of course, Kaggle is just another spin on crowdsourcing, tapping the global brain to solve a big problem. That stuff has been around for a decade or more, at least back to Wikipedia (or farther back, Linux, etc). And companies like TaskRabbit and oDesk have thrown jobs to the crowd for several years. But I think Kaggle, and other online labor markets, represent more than that, and I'll offer two arguments. First, Kaggle doesn't incorporate work from all levels of proficiency, professionals to amateurs. Participants are experts, and they aren't working for benevolent reasons alone: they want to win, and they want to get better to improve their chances of winning next time. Second, Kaggle doesn't just create the incidental work product, it creates a new marketplace for work, a deeper disruption in a professional field. Unlike traditional temp labor, these aren't bottom of the totem pole jobs. Kagglers are on top. And that disruption is what will kill Joy's Law.

Because here's the thing: the Kaggle ranking has become an essential metric in the world of data science. Employers like American Express and the New York Times have begun listing a Kaggle rank as an essential qualification in their help wanted ads for data scientists. It's not just a merit badge for the coders; it's a more significant, more valuable, indicator of capability than our traditional benchmarks for proficiency or expertise. In other words, your Ivy League diploma and IBM resume don't matter so much as my Kaggle score. It's flipping the resume, where your work is measurable and metricized and your value in the marketplace is more valuable than the place you work.
academia  datamining  economics  data  kaggle  data-science  ranking  work  competition  crowdsourcing  contracting 
april 2013 by jm
The Cake Cafe map of Ireland
'Now that Dublin is in our bag, on our Tea Towel and across our Aprons, The Cake Café is going to create a new map of Ireland. We want to fill this map with all of your favorite places in land. Please send us locations that turn you on, fire your imaginations, or just fulfill your dreams; what ever you think should be included. Please pass the request on to friends in far flung parts of the land so they too can send their suggestions; natural or unnatural, animal or man made, a view, a corner of a field, an island or even a journey or hidden places to enjoy a picnic. -- thecakecafe /at/ gmail.com'.

Their map of Dublin is a work of genius -- I love that they include a decent chunk of the Northside, which was a notable failure of the Alljoy Design version. I can't wait to see what they come up with for Ireland.
cake-cafe  ireland  maps  mapping  crowdsourcing  dublin  design  tea-towels 
april 2012 by jm

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