jm + crime   41

Investigation finds inmates built computers and hid them in prison ceiling
Prisoners built computers from parts, hid them in the ceiling, and connected them to the administrative network. 'The Ohio Inspector General says investigators found an inmate used the computers to steal the identity of another inmate, and then submit credit card applications, and commit tax fraud. They also found inmates used the computers to create security clearance passes that gave them access to restricted areas.'
computers  prison  hacks  crime  ohio 
april 2017 by jm
Artificial intelligence is ripe for abuse, tech researcher warns: 'a fascist's dream' | Technology | The Guardian
“We should always be suspicious when machine learning systems are described as free from bias if it’s been trained on human-generated data,” Crawford said. “Our biases are built into that training data.”

In the Chinese research it turned out that the faces of criminals were more unusual than those of law-abiding citizens. “People who had dissimilar faces were more likely to be seen as untrustworthy by police and judges. That’s encoding bias,” Crawford said. “This would be a terrifying system for an autocrat to get his hand on.” [...]

With AI this type of discrimination can be masked in a black box of algorithms, as appears to be the case with a company called Faceception, for instance, a firm that promises to profile people’s personalities based on their faces. In its own marketing material, the company suggests that Middle Eastern-looking people with beards are “terrorists”, while white looking women with trendy haircuts are “brand promoters”.
bias  ai  racism  politics  big-data  technology  fascism  crime  algorithms  faceception  discrimination  computer-says-no 
march 2017 by jm
Maniac Killers of the Bangalore IT Department
On "techies" and their tenuous relationship with Indian society:
Technology was supposed to deliver India from poverty, but in Bangalore it’s also deepened the division between rich and poor, young and old, modern and traditional. As the city has grown richer, it’s also become unruly and unfamiliar. If the tech worker is the star of the Indian economy, then the techie is his shadow— spoiled, untrustworthy, adulterous, depressed, and sometimes just plain senseless. (“TECHIE WITH EARPHONES RUN OVER BY TRAIN.”) In one occupational boogeyman, Bangaloreans can see their future and their fears. [....]

“TECHIE’S WIFE MURDERED” read the headlines in both the Hindu and the Bangalore Mirror. “TECHIE STABS FRIEND’S WIFE TO DEATH” ran in the Deccan Herald. To read the Indian newspapers regularly is to believe the software engineer is the country’s most cursed figure. Almost every edition carries a gruesome story involving a techie accused of homicide, rape, burglary, blackmail, assault, injury, suicide, or another crime. When techies are the victims, it’s just as newsworthy. The Times of India, the country’s largest English-language paper, has carried “TECHIE DIES IN FREAK ACCIDENT” and “MAN HELD FOR PUSHING TECHIE FROM TRAIN”; in the Hindu, readers found “TEACHER CHOPS OFF FINGERS OF TECHIE HUSBAND” and “TECHIE DIED AFTER BEING FORCE-FED CYANIDE.” A long-standing journalistic adage says, “If it bleeds, it leads.” In India, if it codes, it explodes.
crime  tech  india  bangalore  pune  society  techies  work  jobs 
february 2017 by jm
Founder of Google X has no concept of how machine learning as policing tool risks reinforcing implicit bias
This is shocking:
At the end of the panel on artificial intelligence, a young black woman asked [Sebastian Thrun, CEO of the education startup Udacity, who is best known for founding Google X] whether bias in machine learning “could perpetuate structural inequality at a velocity much greater than perhaps humans can.” She offered the example of criminal justice, where “you have a machine learning tool that can identify criminals, and criminals may disproportionately be black because of other issues that have nothing to do with the intrinsic nature of these people, so the machine learns that black people are criminals, and that’s not necessarily the outcome that I think we want.”
In his reply, Thrun made it sound like her concern was one about political correctness, not unconscious bias. “Statistically what the machines do pick up are patterns and sometimes we don’t like these patterns. Sometimes they’re not politically correct,” Thrun said. “When we apply machine learning methods sometimes the truth we learn really surprises us, to be honest, and I think it’s good to have a dialogue about this.”


"the truth"! Jesus. We are fucked
google  googlex  bias  racism  implicit-bias  machine-learning  ml  sebastian-thrun  udacity  inequality  policing  crime 
october 2016 by jm
The best thing to mark National Stalking Awareness Week would be to scrap the law on stalking
"The Secret Barrister" explains a classic case of empty-gesture lawmaking in the UK:
in 2012, the coalition government, in a fit of virtue signalling, announced a bold plan to offer extra protection to victims of stalking, following a rash of reported cases where obsessive nutjobs had slipped through the net. Hence, via the 2012 Act, section 2A was shoved into the Protection from Harassment Act, creating a shiny new offence of stalking.

What is stalking, you ask? Well here’s the clever bit. Stalking is…”a course of conduct which amounts to harassment…and [where] the acts or omissions involved are ones associated with stalking“. To inject some colour into the dull circularity of the definition, section 2A(3) provides “examples of acts or omissions associated with stalking”. In other words, you need to prove that the defendant is guilty of both harassment and stalking, in order to convict them of stalking. Therefore, proving stalking is by definition harder for the prosecution than simply proving harassment.

And what do you get if you opt for the harder road? What prize awaits the victorious prosecutor who has slogged her way through the additional evidential burden thrust upon her by section 2A? The answer is….nothing. Or at least, nothing more than if you successfully prosecuted for harassment. The maximum sentence in each case is 6 months’ imprisonment.

It is the very definition of empty gesture legislating. Section 2A is so very pointlessly pointless that I want urgently to go back in time to the day when then-crime prevention minister Jeremy Browne was hubristically prattling on about what a difference this law is going to make and shove a whoopee pie right up his schnoz. Section 2A does nothing other than create a new offence that is harder to prove than an existing offence that prohibits the same conduct, solely, it seems, to allow for the drawing of an entirely semantic distinction between “harassment” and “stalking”.
harrassment  stalking  law  legislation  uk  police  crime  prosecution 
september 2016 by jm
Brian Krebs - The Democratization of Censorship
Events of the past week have convinced me that one of the fastest-growing censorship threats on the Internet today comes not from nation-states, but from super-empowered individuals who have been quietly building extremely potent cyber weapons with transnational reach. More than 20 years after Gilmore first coined [his] turn of phrase, his most notable quotable has effectively been inverted — “Censorship can in fact route around the Internet.” The Internet can’t route around censorship when the censorship is all-pervasive and armed with, for all practical purposes, near-infinite reach and capacity.
brian-krebs  censorship  ddos  internet  web  politics  crime  security  iot 
september 2016 by jm
Northland man denies burning down house but insurer refuses to pay out
This is a mad story. The insurance company is accusing a guy in NZ of using remote-login software from 400km away to trigger a "print" command to a complicated Heath Robinson setup in order to light a fire to burn down his house
fraud  insurance  weird  nz  crime  printers  remote-login 
september 2016 by jm
Machine Bias: There’s Software Used Across the Country to Predict Future Criminals. And it’s Biased Against Blacks. - ProPublica
holy crap, this is dystopian:
The first time Paul Zilly heard of his score — and realized how much was riding on it — was during his sentencing hearing on Feb. 15, 2013, in court in Barron County, Wisconsin. Zilly had been convicted of stealing a push lawnmower and some tools. The prosecutor recommended a year in county jail and follow-up supervision that could help Zilly with “staying on the right path.” His lawyer agreed to a plea deal.
But Judge James Babler had seen Zilly’s scores. Northpointe’s software had rated Zilly as a high risk for future violent crime and a medium risk for general recidivism. “When I look at the risk assessment,” Babler said in court, “it is about as bad as it could be.”
Then Babler overturned the plea deal that had been agreed on by the prosecution and defense and imposed two years in state prison and three years of supervision.
dystopia  law  policing  risk  risk-assessment  northpointe  racism  fortune-telling  crime 
may 2016 by jm
Chinese censorship: arbitrary rule changes are a form of powerful intermittent reinforcement
China's Internet censors are capricious and impossible to predict -- but this isn't because China's censors are incompetent, rather, they're tapping into one of the most powerful forms of conditioning, the uncertainty born of intermittent reinforcement. [...] As C Custer writes at Tech in Asia, this caprice is by design: by not specifying a set of hard and fast rules, but rather the constant risk of being taken down for crossing some invisible line, China's censors inspire risk-aversion in people who rely on the net to be heard or earn their livings. It's what Singaporeans call "out of bounds," the unspecified realm of things you mustn't, shouldn't or won't want to enter.
risk  risk-aversion  censorship  control  china  politics  enforcement  crime  self-censorship 
may 2016 by jm
Canadian Police Obtained BlackBerry’s Global Decryption Key in 2010
According to technical reports by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police that were filed in court, law enforcement intercepted and decrypted roughly one million PIN-to-PIN BlackBerry messages in connection with the probe. The report doesn't disclose exactly where the key — effectively a piece of code that could break the encryption on virtually any BlackBerry message sent from one device to another — came from. But, as one police officer put it, it was a key that could unlock millions of doors.
Government lawyers spent almost two years fighting in a Montreal courtroom to keep this information out of the public record.
canada  crime  encryption  security  blackberry  crypto  rcmp  police  rogers  montreal  rim 
april 2016 by jm
the murky origins of Truecrypt
Allegedly, Truecrypt, the disk encryption tool, was written by a multi-millionaire international arms dealer and criminal kingpin. Hell of an assertion, this!
crime  crypto  truecrypt 
march 2016 by jm
How Stingrays were unmasked
'THE DRAGNET: How a man accused of million-dollar fraud uncovered a never before seen, secret surveillance device'
stingrays  crime  fraud  surveillance  mobile  police  imsi-catchers 
january 2016 by jm
Gardai find 70 stolen bikes in one house being readied for export
The Limerick Leader quoted other unnamed gardai who said they believed those who had stolen the bikes were selling them to a third party for shipment abroad, most likely to another country in Europe. “It would seem that he has his own network on the Continent and has a lucrative market for the bikes he sends on,” said one of the sources quoted in the report. “Some of the racing bikes would fetch large sums of money on the Continent.”

Trucks were seen arriving and departing the house in Castletroy where the find was made. And while it was unclear exactly how gardai were informed of the suspicious activity, when a team of officers went to search the property they found the bikes in the back garden.
bikes  theft  limerick  crime  bike-theft  ireland  castletroy 
december 2015 by jm
Three quarters of cars stolen in France 'electronically hacked' - Telegraph
The astonishing figures come two months after computer scientists in the UK warned that thousands of cars – including high-end brands such as Porsches and Maseratis - are at risk of electronic hacking. Their research was suppressed for two years by a court injunction for fear it would help thieves steal vehicles to order. The kit required to carry out such “mouse jacking”, as the French have coined the practice, can be freely purchased on the internet for around £700 and the theft of a range of models can be pulled off “within minutes,” motor experts warn.
hacking  security  security-through-obscurity  mouse-jacking  cars  safety  theft  crime  france  smart-cars 
november 2015 by jm
An Analysis of Reshipping Mule Scams
We observed that the vast majority of the re-shipped packages end up in the Moscow, Russia area, and that the goods purchased with stolen credit cards span multiple categories, from expensive electronics such as Apple products, to designer clothes, to DSLR cameras and even weapon accessories. Given the amount of goods shipped by the reshipping mule sites that we analysed, the annual revenue generated from such operations can span between 1.8 and 7.3 million US dollars. The overall losses are much higher though: the online merchant loses an expensive item from its inventory and typically has to refund the owner of the stolen credit card. In addition, the rogue goods typically travel labeled as “second hand goods” and therefore custom taxes are also evaded. Once the items purchased with stolen credit cards reach their destination they will be sold on the black market by cybercriminals. [...] When applying for the job, people are usually required to send the operator copies of their ID cards and passport. After they are hired, mules are promised to be paid at the end of their first month of employment. However, from our data it is clear that mules are usually never paid. After their first month expires, they are never contacted back by the operator, who just moves on and hires new mules. In other words, the mules become victims of this scam themselves, by never seeing a penny. Moreover, because they sent copies of their documents to the criminals, mules can potentially become victims of identity theft.
crime  law  cybercrime  mules  shipping-scams  identity-theft  russia  moscow  scams  papers 
november 2015 by jm
Red lines and no-go zones - the coming surveillance debate
The Anderson Report to the House of Lords in the UK on RIPA introduces a concept of a "red line":
"Firm limits must also be written into the law: not merely safeguards, but red lines that may not be crossed." …   
"Some might find comfort in a world in which our every interaction and movement could be recorded, viewed in real time and indefinitely retained for possible future use by the authorities. Crime fighting, security, safety or public health justifications are never hard to find." [13.19] 

The Report then gives examples, such as a perpetual video feed from every room in every house, the police undertaking to view the record only on receipt of a complaint; blanket drone-based surveillance; licensed service providers, required as a condition of the licence to retain within the jurisdiction a complete plain-text version of every communication to be made available to the authorities on request; a constant data feed from vehicles, domestic appliances and health-monitoring personal devices; fitting of facial recognition software to every CCTV camera and the insertion of a location-tracking chip under every individual's skin.

It goes on:
"The impact of such powers on the innocent could be mitigated by the usual apparatus of safeguards, regulators and Codes of Practice. But a country constructed on such a basis would surely be intolerable to many of its inhabitants. A state that enjoyed all those powers would be truly totalitarian, even if the authorities had the best interests of its people at heart." [13.20] …  

"The crucial objection is that of principle. Such a society would have gone beyond Bentham's Panopticon (whose inmates did not know they were being watched) into a world where constant surveillance was a certainty and quiescence the inevitable result. There must surely come a point (though it comes at different places for different people) where the escalation of intrusive powers becomes too high a price to pay for a safer and more law abiding environment." [13.21]
panopticon  jeremy-bentham  law  uk  dripa  ripa  surveillance  spying  police  drones  facial-recognition  future  tracking  cctv  crime 
november 2015 by jm
Your Relative's DNA Could Turn You Into A Suspect
Familial DNA searching has massive false positives, but is being used to tag suspects:
The bewildered Usry soon learned that he was a suspect in the 1996 murder of an Idaho Falls teenager named Angie Dodge. Though a man had been convicted of that crime after giving an iffy confession, his DNA didn’t match what was found at the crime scene. Detectives had focused on Usry after running a familial DNA search, a technique that allows investigators to identify suspects who don’t have DNA in a law enforcement database but whose close relatives have had their genetic profiles cataloged. In Usry’s case the crime scene DNA bore numerous similarities to that of Usry’s father, who years earlier had donated a DNA sample to a genealogy project through his Mormon church in Mississippi. That project’s database was later purchased by Ancestry, which made it publicly searchable—a decision that didn’t take into account the possibility that cops might someday use it to hunt for genetic leads.

Usry, whose story was first reported in The New Orleans Advocate, was finally cleared after a nerve-racking 33-day wait — the DNA extracted from his cheek cells didn’t match that of Dodge’s killer, whom detectives still seek. But the fact that he fell under suspicion in the first place is the latest sign that it’s time to set ground rules for familial DNA searching, before misuse of the imperfect technology starts ruining lives.
dna  familial-dna  false-positives  law  crime  idaho  murder  mormon  genealogy  ancestry.com  databases  biometrics  privacy  genes 
october 2015 by jm
Dublin Bike Theft Survey Results
Dublin Cycling Campaign's survey results: estimated 20,000 bikes stolen per year in Dublin; only 1% of thefts results in a conviction
dublin  bikes  cycling  theft  crime  statistics  infographics  dcc 
may 2015 by jm
Bank of the Underworld - The Atlantic
Prosecutors analyzed approximately 500 of Liberty Reserve’s biggest accounts, which constituted 44 percent of its business. The government contends that 32 of these accounts were connected to the sale of stolen credit cards and 117 were used by Ponzi-scheme operators. All of this activity flourished, prosecutors said, because Liberty Reserve made no real effort to monitor its users for criminal behavior. What’s more, records showed that one of the company’s top tech experts, Mark Marmilev, who was also arrested, appeared to have promoted Liberty Reserve in chat rooms devoted to Ponzi schemes.


(via Nelson)
scams  fraud  crime  currency  the-atlantic  liberty-reserve  ponzi-schemes  costa-rica  arthur-budovsky  banking  anonymity  cryptocurrency  money-laundering  carding 
april 2015 by jm
The missing MtGox bitcoins
Most or all of the missing bitcoins were stolen straight out of the MtGox hot wallet over time, beginning in late 2011. As a result, MtGox operated at fractional reserve for years (knowingly or not), and was practically depleted of bitcoins by 2013. A significant number of stolen bitcoins were deposited onto various exchanges, including MtGox itself, and probably sold for cash (which at the bitcoin prices of the day would have been substantially less than the hundreds of millions of dollars they were worth at the time of MtGox's collapse).

MtGox' bitcoins continuously went missing over time, but at a decreasing pace. Again by the middle of 2013, the curve goes more or less flat, matching the hypothesis that by that time there may not have been any more bitcoins left to lose. The rate of loss otherwise seems unusually smooth and at the same time not strictly relative to any readily available factors such as remaining BTC holdings, transaction volumes or the BTC price. Worth pointing out is that, thanks to having matched up most of the deposit/withdrawal log earlier, we can at this point at least rule out the possibility of any large-scale fake deposits — the bitcoins going into MtGox were real, meaning the discrepancy was likely rather caused by bitcoins leaving MtGox without going through valid withdrawals.
mtgox  bitcoin  security  fail  currency  theft  crime  btc 
april 2015 by jm
FBI admits flaws in hair analysis over decades
Wow, this is staggering.
The Justice Department and FBI have formally acknowledged that nearly every examiner in an elite FBI forensic unit gave flawed testimony in almost all trials in which they offered evidence against criminal defendants over more than a two-decade period before 2000. [....]

The review confirmed that FBI experts systematically testified to the near-certainty of “matches” of crime-scene hairs to defendants, backing their claims by citing incomplete or misleading statistics drawn from their case work. In reality, there is no accepted research on how often hair from different people may appear the same. Since 2000, the lab has used visual hair comparison to rule out someone as a possible source of hair or in combination with more accurate DNA testing. Warnings about the problem have been mounting. In 2002, the FBI reported that its own DNA testing found that examiners reported false hair matches more than 11 percent of the time.
fbi  false-positives  hair  dna  biometrics  trials  justice  experts  crime  forensics  inaccuracy  csi 
april 2015 by jm
Keeping Your Car Safe From Electronic Thieves - NYTimes.com
In a normal scenario, when you walk up to a car with a keyless entry and try the door handle, the car wirelessly calls out for your key so you don’t have to press any buttons to get inside. If the key calls back, the door unlocks. But the keyless system is capable of searching for a key only within a couple of feet. Mr. Danev said that when the teenage girl turned on her device, it amplified the distance that the car can search, which then allowed my car to talk to my key, which happened to be sitting about 50 feet away, on the kitchen counter. And just like that, open sesame.


What the hell -- who designed a system that would auto-unlock based on signal strength alone?!!
security  fail  cars  keys  signal  proximity  keyless-entry  prius  toyota  crime  amplification  power-amplifiers  3db  keyless 
april 2015 by jm
Australia tries to ban crypto research – by ACCIDENT • The Register
Researchers are warned off [discussing] 512-bits-plus key lengths, systems “designed or modified to perform cryptanalytic functions, or “designed or modified to use 'quantum cryptography'”. [....] “an email to a fellow academic could land you a 10 year prison sentence”.


https://twitter.com/_miw/status/556023024009224192 notes 'the DSGL 5A002 defines it as >512bit RSA, >512bit DH, >112 bit ECC and >56 bit symmetric ciphers; weak as fuck i say.'
law  australia  crime  crypto  ecc  rsa  stupidity  fail 
january 2015 by jm
Call for co-ordinated plan to combat soaring bike theft | Dublin Cycling Campaign
Bicycle theft in Ireland has doubled in Ireland since the introduction of the Bike to Work scheme in 2009. Almost 4,500 bicycle thefts[1] were reported in Dublin in 2013, but the actual number of bike thefts is likely to be in the region of 20,000 in 2013 according to Irish household surveys[2] and international experience[3,4]. The chances of a bike thief being caught is low, with a conviction rate of only 2%[5] or reported thefts. Approximately 230,000 bicycles are imported into Ireland each year[6]. “Bike theft is a low-risk, high-reward crime. If cars were being stolen at this rate there would be uproar.” Says Keith Byrne, Chairperson of the Dublin Cycling Campaign.

Fear of bicycle theft may discourage bicycle use and many bicycle theft victims do not buy a replacement [7,8]. “Many people give up on cycling after their bicycle is stolen and it discourages others from taking up cycling as the word about the high risk of theft spreads. We need a co-ordinated multi-agency plan to tackle bicycle theft if we are to reach the Government target of 10% of journeys by bicycle by 2020” says Keith Byrne.


Amen to that.
cycling  theft  stealing  bikes  dublin  crime  dcc  bike-to-work 
november 2014 by jm
ISPAI responds to TD Patrick O'Donovan's bizarre comments regarding "open source browsers"
ISPAI is rather dismayed and somewhat confused by the recent press release issued by Deputy Patrick O’Donovan (FG). He appears to be asking the Oireachtas Communications Committee (of which he is a member) to investigate: “the matter of tougher controls on the use of open source internet browsers and payment systems”  which he claims “allow users to remain anonymous for illegal trade of drugs weapons and pornography.”

Deputy O’Donovan would do well to ask the advice of industry experts on these matters given that legislating to curtail the use of such legitimate software or services, which may be misused by some, is neither practical nor logical. Whether or not a browser is open source bears no relevance to its ability to be the subject of anonymous use. Indeed, Deputy O’Donovan must surely be confusing and conflating different technical concepts? In tracing illegal activities, Law Enforcement Agencies and co-operating parties will use IP addresses – users’ choice of browser has little relevance to an investigation of criminal activity.

Equally, it may be that the Deputy is uncomfortable with the concept of electronic payment systems but these underpin the digital economy which is bringing enormous benefit to Ireland. Yes, these may be misused by criminals but so are cash and traditional banking services. Restricting the growth of innovative financial services is not the solution to tackling cyber criminals who might be operating what he describes as “online supermarkets for illegal goods.”

Tackling international cybercrime requires more specialist Law Enforcement resources at national level and improved international police cooperation supported by revision of EU legislation relating to obtaining server log evidence existing in other jurisdictions.
ispai  open-source  patrick-o-donovan  fine-gael  press-releases  tor  darknet  crime 
january 2014 by jm
Jesse Willms, the Dark Lord of the Internet - Taylor Clark - The Atlantic
“It was an out-and-out hijacking,” LeFevre told me. “They counterfeited our product, they pirated our Web site, and they basically directed all of their customer service to us.” At the peak of Willms’s sales, LeFevre says, dazzlesmile was receiving 1,000 calls a day from customers trying to cancel orders for a product it didn’t even sell. When irate consumers made the name dazzlesmile synonymous with online scamming, LeFevre’s sales effectively dropped to zero. Dazzlesmile sued Willms in November 2009; he later paid a settlement.
scams  hijacking  ads  affiliate  one-wierd-trick  health  dieting  crime 
december 2013 by jm
Forensic Topology
The sounds were not, however, caused by ghosts but by a group of three or four men at least to some degree professionally trained, the FBI now believes, in tunneling: a close-knit and highly disciplined team, perhaps from the construction industry, perhaps even a disgruntled public works crew who decided to put their knowledge of the city’s underside to more lucrative work. After all, Rehder explained, their route into the bank was as much brute-force excavation as it was a retracing of the region’s buried waterways, accessing the neighborhood by way of the city’s complicated storm-sewer network, itself built along old creek beds that no longer appear on city maps. As LAPD lieutenant Doug Collisson, one of the men present on the day of the tunnel’s discovery, explained to the Los Angeles Times back in 1987, the crew behind the burglary “would have had to require some knowledge of soil composition and technical engineering. … The way the shaft itself was constructed, it was obviously well-researched and extremely sophisticated.” Rehder actually goes further, remarking that when Detective Dennis Pagenkopp “showed crime scene photos of the core bit holes” produced by the burglars’ boring upward into the vault “to guys who were in the concrete-coring business, they whistled with professional admiration.”
cities  crime  architecture  digging  tunnels  subterranean  la  lapd  banks  via:bldgblog  sewers 
october 2013 by jm
Experian Sold Consumer Data to ID Theft Service
This is what happens when you don't have strong controls on data protection/data privacy -- the US experience.
While [posing as a US-based private investigator] may have gotten the [Vietnam-based gang operating the massive identity fraud site Superget.info] past Experian and/or CourtVentures’ screening process, according to Martin there were other signs that should have alerted Experian to potential fraud associated with the account. For example, Martin said the Secret Service told him that the alleged proprietor of Superget.info had paid Experian for his monthly data access charges using wire transfers sent from Singapore.

“The issue in my mind was the fact that this went on for almost a year after Experian did their due diligence and purchased” Court Ventures, Martin said. “Why didn’t they question cash wires coming in every month? Experian portrays themselves as the data-breach experts, and they sell identity theft protection services. How this could go on without them detecting it I don’t know. Our agreement with them was that our information was to be used for fraud prevention and ID verification, and was only to be sold to licensed and credentialed U.S. businesses, not to someone overseas.”


via Simon McGarr
via:tupp_ed  privacy  security  crime  data-protection  data-privacy  experian  data-breaches  courtventures  superget  scams  fraud  identity  identity-theft 
october 2013 by jm
Silk Road busted
This is a pretty good summary of the salient points from the criminal complaint against Ross William Ulbricht -- I'd say it's pretty bad news for any users of the dodgy site, particularly given this:
"During the 60-day period from May 24, 2013 to July 23, 2013, there were approximately 1,217,218 communications sent between Silk Road users through Silk Road's private-message system."


According to the complaint, those are now in the FBI's hands -- likely unencrypted.
crime  silk-road  drugs  busts  tor  ross-william-ulbricht  fbi 
october 2013 by jm
Mail from the (Velvet) Cybercrime Underground
Brian Krebs manages to thwart an attempted framing for possession of Silk Road heroin. bloody hell
silk-road  drugs  bitcoin  ecommerce  brian-krebs  crime  framed  cybercrime  russia  scary  law-enforcement 
july 2013 by jm
Street Cuffs: L.A. Sees Big Jump In Bike Thefts
Some [LA] bike messengers last month took justice into their own hands when they caught two suspected thieves, teenage boys who attended a local Catholic high school. According to police, the messengers stripped down the teens to their boxer shorts before taking their cellphones, backpacks and clothes.

“They meted out street justice. We don’t condone street justice. They never threatened them. But they made it clear: don’t mess with another person’s property,” Los Angeles Police Lt. Paul Vernon said. “This incident and the arrests are the tip of the iceberg when comes to people stealing bicycles.”

Vernon said the two boys told police they were robbed by about 20 men on bicycles at 6th Street and Grand Avenue about 3 p.m. on Jan. 12. Investigators said they cannot prove the boys were stealing bikes and continue to look for the assailants.
cycling  theft  robbery  bike-theft  la  crime  vigilantes  cycle-couriers 
july 2013 by jm
drug cartel-controlled mobile comms networks
“The Mexican military has recently broken up several secret telecommunications networks that were built and controlled by drug cartels so they could coordinate drug shipments, monitor their rivals and orchestrate attacks on the security forces. A network that was dismantled just last week provided cartel members with cellphone and radio communications across four northeastern states. The network had coverage along almost 500 miles of the Texas border and extended nearly another 500 miles into Mexico’s interior. Soldiers seized 167 antennas, more than 150 repeaters and thousands of cellphones and radios that operated on the system. Some of the remote antennas and relay stations were powered with solar panels.”
mexico  drugs  networks  mobile-phones  crime 
february 2013 by jm
BBC News - The hum that helps to fight crime
'Dr Harrison said: "If we have we can extract [the hum of the mains AC power's 50Hz wave] and compare it with the database, if it is a continuous recording, it will all match up nicely. "If we've got some breaks in the recording, if it's been stopped and started, the profiles won't match or there will be a section missing. Or if it has come from two different recordings looking as if it is one, we'll have two different profiles within that one recording." In the UK, because one national grid supplies the country with electricity, the fluctuations in frequency are the same the country over. So it does not matter if the recording has been made in Aberdeen or Southampton, the comparison will work.'
buzz  hum  uk  mains  power  50hz  crime  forensics  bbc 
december 2012 by jm
What Happens to Stolen Bicycles?
'Bike thievery is essentially a risk-free crime. If you were a criminal, that might just strike your fancy. If Goldman Sachs didn’t have more profitable market inefficencies to exploit, they might be out there arbitraging stolen bikes.'

Good summary, and I suspect a lot applies in Dublin too -- flea markets and vanloads of stolen bikes being sent to other cities for reselling.
via:hn  economics  crime  bikes  theft  goldman-sachs 
august 2012 by jm
The lessons I learnt from my iPhone mugging | Benjamin Cohen on Technology
some good tips on iPhone security settings, in particular disabling the ability to turn off location services via Restrictions. I should do this
crime  iphone  location  london  mugging  phones  security  theft 
may 2012 by jm
Spam King Leo Kuvayev Jailed on Child Sex Charges — Krebs on Security
'A man known as one of the world’s top purveyors of junk e-mail has been imprisoned in Russia for allegedly molesting [more than *50*] underage girls from a Moscow orphanage, KrebsOnSecurity.com has learned.' lovely
spam  russia  jail  crime  moscow  leo-kuvayev  from delicious
august 2010 by jm
Yakuza 3 reviewed by Yakuza
wow, fantastic review -- real Japanese mobsters give their take on SEGA's latest videogame
crime  games  japan  videogames  yakuza  sega  from delicious
august 2010 by jm
MacRumors iPhone Blog: Undercover 1.5 Adds Push Notification Tool to iPhone Theft Recovery App
very clever. 'You can make the messages as enticing as you want - say, by having them pretend to be a notification from your bank account. If the crook chooses to view the push notification, Undercover will launch, [..] loading any Website of your choosing, such as the aforementioned bank's. While the thief is distracted, Undercover will be happy to save the device's GPS coordinates and IP address to Orbicule's Website.'
iphone  theft  crime  push-notifications  undercover  from delicious
november 2009 by jm
Track down your stolen laptop – Prey
hmm, a nifty app that takes pics of the desktop, activates the webcam etc. and uploads to a central server if you activate a 'my laptop has been stolen' bit
prey  theft  laptop  osx  linux  windows  tracking  recovery  crime  lojack  from delicious
october 2009 by jm
UK company selling "have you been phished" check using stolen data
according to this, a retired cop has set up a company called Lucid Intelligence with 'the records of four million Britons, and 40 million people worldwide, mostly Americans', and plans to 'charge members of the public for access to his database to check whether their data security has been breached.' How is this legal under Data Protection law? wtf
privacy  uk  law  hacking  phishing  fraud  crime  police  database  identity-theft  lucid-intelligence  data-protection  security  colin-holder 
july 2009 by jm

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