jm + cory-doctorow   7

Cory Doctorow: Zuck’s Empire of Oily Rags
the sophisticated targeting systems available through Facebook, Google, Twitter, and other Big Tech ad platforms made it easy to find the racist, xenophobic, fearful, angry people who wanted to believe that foreigners were destroying their country while being bankrolled by George Soros.

Remember that elections are generally knife-edge affairs, even for politicians who’ve held their seats for decades with slim margins: 60% of the vote is an excellent win. Remember, too, that the winner in most races is “none of the above,” with huge numbers of voters sitting out the election. If even a small number of these non-voters can be motivated to show up at the polls, safe seats can be made contestable. In a tight race, having a cheap way to reach all the latent Klansmen in a district and quietly inform them that Donald J. Trump is their man is a game-changer.

Cambridge Analytica are like stage mentalists: they’re doing something labor-intensive and pretending that it’s something supernatural. A stage mentalist will train for years to learn to quickly memorize a deck of cards and then claim that they can name your card thanks to their psychic powers. You never see the unglamorous, unimpressive memorization practice. Cambridge Analytica uses Facebook to find racist jerks and tell them to vote for Trump and then they claim that they’ve discovered a mystical way to get otherwise sensible people to vote for maniacs.
facebook  politics  surveillance  cory-doctorow  google  twitter  advertising  elections  cambridge-analytica  racism  nazis 
13 days ago by jm
Exclusive: Snowden intelligence docs reveal UK spooks' malware checklist / Boing Boing
This is an excellent essay from Cory Doctorow on mass surveillance in the post-Snowden era, and the difference between HUMINT and SIGINT. So much good stuff, including this (new to me) cite for, "Goodhart's law", on secrecy as it affects adversarial classification:
The problem with this is that once you accept this framing, and note the happy coincidence that your paymasters just happen to have found a way to spy on everyone, the conclusion is obvious: just mine all of the data, from everyone to everyone, and use an algorithm to figure out who’s guilty. The bad guys have a Modus Operandi, as anyone who’s watched a cop show knows. Find the MO, turn it into a data fingerprint, and you can just sort the firehose’s output into ”terrorist-ish” and ”unterrorist-ish.”

Once you accept this premise, then it’s equally obvious that the whole methodology has to be kept from scrutiny. If you’re depending on three ”tells” as indicators of terrorist planning, the terrorists will figure out how to plan their attacks without doing those three things.

This even has a name: Goodhart's law. "When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure." Google started out by gauging a web page’s importance by counting the number of links they could find to it. This worked well before they told people what they were doing. Once getting a page ranked by Google became important, unscrupulous people set up dummy sites (“link-farms”) with lots of links pointing at their pages.
adversarial-classification  classification  surveillance  nsa  gchq  cory-doctorow  privacy  snooping  goodharts-law  google  anti-spam  filtering  spying  snowden 
february 2016 by jm
You Are Not a Digital Native: Privacy in the Age of the Internet
an open letter from Cory Doctorow to teen readers re privacy.

'The problem with being a “digital native” is that it transforms all of your screw-ups into revealed deep truths about how humans are supposed to use the Internet. So if you make mistakes with your Internet privacy, not only do the companies who set the stage for those mistakes (and profited from them) get off Scot-free, but everyone else who raises privacy concerns is dismissed out of hand. After all, if the “digital natives” supposedly don’t care about their privacy, then anyone who does is a laughable, dinosauric idiot, who isn’t Down With the Kids.'
children  privacy  kids  teens  digital-natives  surveillance  cory-doctorow  danah-boyd 
may 2014 by jm
Censorship is inseparable from surveillance | Technology | guardian.co.uk
'In order to stop you from visiting www.jamesjoycesulysses.com, the national censorwall must intercept all your outgoing internet requests and examine them to determine whether they are for the banned website. That's the difference between the old days of censorship and our new digital censorship world. Today, censorship is inseparable from surveillance.' Very good point from Cory Doctorow
cory-doctorow  censorship  surveillance  firewalls  privacy  internet  freedom 
march 2012 by jm
Cory Doctorow's working environment
hardware and software, specifically, and an Ubuntu/Thinkpad user. some good tips here, and well-written, naturally
cory-doctorow  geek  howto  lifehacks  ubuntu  productivity  tips  tools  from delicious
july 2010 by jm
Cory Doctorow: Persistence Pays Parasites
'Falling victim to a [phish] isn’t just a matter of not being wise to the ways of the world: it’s a matter of being caught out in a moment of distraction and of unlikely circumstance.' +1, that matches with the personal phishing stories I've heard from others
phishing  cory-doctorow  security  anti-phishing  scams  distraction  twitter  from delicious
may 2010 by jm

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