jm + coreos   8

'Lambda and serverless is one of the worst forms of proprietary lock-in we've ever seen in the history of humanity' • The Register
That doesn't mean Polvi is a fan. "Lambda and serverless is one of the worst forms of proprietary lock-in that we've ever seen in the history of humanity," said Polvi, only partly in jest, referring to the most widely used serverless offering, AWS Lambda. "It's seriously as bad as it gets."

He elaborated: "It's code that tied not just to hardware – which we've seen before – but to a data center, you can't even get the hardware yourself. And that hardware is now custom fabbed for the cloud providers with dark fiber that runs all around the world, just for them. So literally the application you write will never get the performance or responsiveness or the ability to be ported somewhere else without having the deployment footprint of Amazon."


Absolutely agreed...
lambda  amazon  aws  containers  coreos  deployment  lockin  proprietary  serverless  alex-polvi  kubernetes 
13 days ago by jm
Collecting my thoughts about Torus
Worryingly-optimistic communications about CoreOS' recently-announced distributed storage system. I had similar thoughts, but Jeff Darcy is actually an expert on this stuff so he's way more worth listening to on the topic ;)
jeff-darcy  distcomp  filesystems  coreos  torus  storage 
june 2016 by jm
CoreOS and Prometheus: Building monitoring for the next generation of cluster infrastructure
Ooh, this is a great plan. :applause:
Enabling GIFEE — Google Infrastructure for Everyone Else — is a primary mission at CoreOS, and open source is key to that goal. [....]

Prometheus was initially created to handle monitoring and alerting in modern microservice architectures. It steadily grew to fit the wider idea of cloud native infrastructure. Though it was not intentional in the original design, Prometheus and Kubernetes conveniently share the key concept of identifying entities by labels, making the semantics of monitoring Kubernetes clusters simple. As we discussed previously on this blog, Prometheus metrics formed the basis of our analysis of Kubernetes scheduler performance, and led directly to improvements in that code. Metrics are essential not just to keep systems running, but also to analyze and improve application behavior.

All things considered, Prometheus was an obvious choice for the next open source project CoreOS wanted to support and improve with internal developers committed to the code base.
monitoring  coreos  prometheus  metrics  clustering  ops  gifee  google  kubernetes 
may 2016 by jm
Anatomy of a Modern Production Stack
Interesting post, but I think it falls into a common trap for the xoogler or ex-Amazonian -- assuming that all the BigCo mod cons are required to operate, when some are luxuries than can be skipped for a few years to get some real products built
architecture  ops  stack  docker  containerization  deployment  containers  rkt  coreos  prod  monitoring  xooglers 
september 2015 by jm
Intel speeds up etcd throughput using ADR Xeon-only hardware feature
To reduce the latency impact of storing to disk, Weaver’s team looked to buffering as a means to absorb the writes and sync them to disk periodically, rather than for each entry. Tradeoffs? They knew memory buffers would help, but there would be potential difficulties with smaller clusters if they violated the stable storage requirement.

Instead, they turned to Intel’s silicon architects about features available in the Xeon line. After describing the core problem, they found out this had been solved in other areas with ADR. After some work to prove out a Linux OS supported use for this, they were confident they had a best-of-both-worlds angle. And it worked. As Weaver detailed in his CoreOS Fest discussion, the response time proved stable. ADR can grab a section of memory, persist it to disk and power it back. It can return entries back to disk and restore back to the buffer. ADR provides the ability to make small (<100MB) segments of memory “stable” enough for Raft log entries. It means it does not need battery-backed memory. It can be orchestrated using Linux or Windows OS libraries. ADR allows the capability to define target memory and determine where to recover. It can also be exposed directly into libs for runtimes like Golang. And it uses silicon features that are accessible on current Intel servers.
kubernetes  coreos  adr  performance  intel  raft  etcd  hardware  linux  persistence  disk  storage  xeon 
may 2015 by jm
Red Hat on rkt vs Docker
This is like watching a train-wreck in slow motion on Groundhog Day. We, in the broader Linux and open source community, have been down this path multiple times over the past fifteen years, specifically with package formats. While there needs to be room for experimentation, having two incompatible specs driven by two startups trying to differentiate and in direct competition is *not* a good thing. It would be better for the community and for everyone who depends on our collective efforts if CoreOS and Docker collaborated on a standardized common spec, image format, and distribution protocol. To this end, we at Red Hat will continue to contribute to both initiatives with the goal of driving convergence.
rkt  docker  appc  coreos  red-hat  dpkg  rpm  linux  packaging  collaboration  open-source 
may 2015 by jm
CoreOS is building a container runtime, Rocket
Whoa, trouble at mill in Dockerland!
When Docker was first introduced to us in early 2013, the idea of a “standard container” was striking and immediately attractive: a simple component, a composable unit, that could be used in a variety of systems. The Docker repository included a manifesto of what a standard container should be. This was a rally cry to the industry, and we quickly followed. Brandon Philips, co-founder/CTO of CoreOS, became a top Docker contributor, and now serves on the Docker governance board. CoreOS is one of the most widely used platforms for Docker containers, and ships releases to the community hours after they happen upstream. We thought Docker would become a simple unit that we can all agree on.

Unfortunately, a simple re-usable component is not how things are playing out. Docker now is building tools for launching cloud servers, systems for clustering, and a wide range of functions: building images, running images, uploading, downloading, and eventually even overlay networking, all compiled into one monolithic binary running primarily as root on your server. The standard container manifesto was removed. We should stop talking about Docker containers, and start talking about the Docker Platform. It is not becoming the simple composable building block we had envisioned.
coreos  docker  linux  containers  open-source  politics  rocket 
december 2014 by jm
etcd
A highly-available key value store for shared configuration and service discovery. etcd is inspired by zookeeper and doozer, with a focus on:

Simple: curl'able user facing API (HTTP+JSON);
Secure: optional SSL client cert authentication;
Fast: benchmarked 1000s of writes/s per instance;
Reliable: Properly distributed using Raft;

Etcd is written in go and uses the raft consensus algorithm to manage a highly availably replicated log.

One of the core components of CoreOS -- http://coreos.com/ .
configuration  distributed  raft  ha  doozer  zookeeper  go  replication  consensus-algorithm  etcd  coreos 
august 2013 by jm

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