jm + control-theory   2

Taming the Beast: How Scylla Leverages Control Theory to Keep Compactions Under Control - ScyllaDB
This is a really nice illustration of the use of control theory to set tunable thresholds automatically in a complex storage system. Nice work Scylla:

At any given moment, a database like ScyllaDB has to juggle the admission of foreground requests with background processes like compactions, making sure that the incoming workload is not severely disrupted by compactions, nor that the compaction backlog is so big that reads are later penalized.

In this article, we showed that isolation among incoming writes and compactions can be achieved by the Schedulers, yet the database is still left with the task of determining the amount of shares of the resources incoming writes and compactions will use.

Scylla steers away from user-defined tunables in this task, as they shift the burden of operation to the user, complicating operations and being fragile against changing workloads. By borrowing from the strong theoretical background of industrial controllers, we can provide an Autonomous Database that adapts to changing workloads without operator intervention.
scylladb  storage  settings  compaction  automation  thresholds  control-theory  ops  cassandra  feedback 
june 2018 by jm
Control theory meets machine learning
'DB: Is there a difference between how control theorists and machine learning researchers think about robustness and error?

BR: In machine learning, we almost always model our errors as being random rather than worst-case. In some sense, random errors are actually much more benign than worst-case errors. [...] In machine learning, by assuming average-case performance, rather than worst-case, we can design predictive algorithms by averaging out the errors over large data sets. We want to be robust to fluctuations in the data, but only on average. This is much less restrictive than the worst-case restrictions in controls.

DB: So control theory is model-based and concerned with worst case. Machine learning is data based and concerned with average case. Is there a middle ground?

BR: I think there is! And I think there's an exciting opportunity here to understand how to combine robust control and reinforcement learning. Being able to build systems from data alone simplifies the engineering process, and has had several recent promising results. Guaranteeing that these systems won't behave catastrophically will enable us to actually deploy machine learning systems in a variety of applications with major impacts on our lives. It might enable safe autonomous vehicles that can navigate complex terrains. Or could assist us in diagnostics and treatments in health care. There are a lot of exciting possibilities, and that's why I'm excited about how to find a bridge between these two viewpoints.'
control-theory  interviews  machine-learning  ml  worst-case  self-driving-cars  cs 
november 2015 by jm

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