jm + continuous-integration   6

Docker image creation, tagging and traceability in Shippable
this is starting to look quite impressive as a well-integrated Docker-meets-CI model; Shippable is basing its builds off Docker baselines and is automatically cutting Docker images of the post-CI stage. Must take another look
shippable  docker  ci  ops  dev  continuous-integration 
august 2015 by jm
Hydra
a Nix-based continuous build system, released under the terms of the GNU GPLv3 or (at your option) any later version. It continuously checks out sources of software projects from version management systems to build, test and release them. The build tasks are described using Nix expressions. This allows a Hydra build task to specify all the dependencies needed to build or test a project. It supports a number of operating systems, such as various GNU/Linux flavours, Mac OS X, and Windows.
nixos  nix  hydra  ci  cd  gplv3  continuous-integration 
march 2015 by jm
Concourse
Concourse is a CI system composed of simple tools and ideas. It can express entire pipelines, integrating with arbitrary resources, or it can be used to execute one-off builds, either locally or in another CI system.
ci  concourse-ci  build  deployment  continuous-integration  continuous-deployment  devops 
march 2015 by jm
Dockerize
A tool to manage inter-container dependencies so that continuous delivery with Jenkins and Docker is feasible. Looks very helpful
docker  provisioning  vms  containers  dockerize  jenkins  continuous-delivery  continuous-integration 
october 2013 by jm
Next Generation Continuous Integration & Deployment with dotCloud’s Docker and Strider
Since Docker treats it’s images as a tree of derivations from a source image, you have the ability to store an image at each stage of a build. This means we can provide full binary images of the environment in which the tests failed. This allows you to run locally bit-for-bit the same container as the CI server ran. Due to the magic of Docker and AUFS Copy-On-Write filesystems, we can store this cheaply.

Often tests pass when built in a CI environment, but when built in another (e.g. production) environment break due to subtle differences. Docker makes it trivial to take exactly the binary environment in which the tests pass, and ship that to production to run it.
docker  strider  continuous-integration  continuous-deployment  deployment  devops  ops  dotcloud  lxc  virtualisation  copy-on-write  images 
july 2013 by jm
Videos from the Continuous Delivery track at QCon SF 2012
Think we'll be watching some of these in work soon -- Jez Humble's talk (the last one) in particular looks good:

Amazon, Etsy, Google and Facebook are all primarily software development shops which command enormous amounts of resources. They are, to use Christopher Little’s metaphor, unicorns. How can the rest of us adopt continuous delivery? That’s the subject of my talk, which describes four case studies of organizations that adopted continuous delivery, with varying degrees of success.

One of my favourites – partly because it’s embedded software, not a website – is the story of HP’s LaserJet Firmware team, who re-architected their software around the principles of continuous delivery. People always want to know the business case for continuous delivery: the FutureSmart team provide one in the book they wrote that discusses how they did it.
continuous-integration  continuous-delivery  build  release  process  dev  deployment  videos  qcon  towatch  hp 
may 2013 by jm

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