jm + containers + coreos   3

'Lambda and serverless is one of the worst forms of proprietary lock-in we've ever seen in the history of humanity' • The Register
That doesn't mean Polvi is a fan. "Lambda and serverless is one of the worst forms of proprietary lock-in that we've ever seen in the history of humanity," said Polvi, only partly in jest, referring to the most widely used serverless offering, AWS Lambda. "It's seriously as bad as it gets."

He elaborated: "It's code that tied not just to hardware – which we've seen before – but to a data center, you can't even get the hardware yourself. And that hardware is now custom fabbed for the cloud providers with dark fiber that runs all around the world, just for them. So literally the application you write will never get the performance or responsiveness or the ability to be ported somewhere else without having the deployment footprint of Amazon."


Absolutely agreed...
lambda  amazon  aws  containers  coreos  deployment  lockin  proprietary  serverless  alex-polvi  kubernetes 
november 2017 by jm
Anatomy of a Modern Production Stack
Interesting post, but I think it falls into a common trap for the xoogler or ex-Amazonian -- assuming that all the BigCo mod cons are required to operate, when some are luxuries than can be skipped for a few years to get some real products built
architecture  ops  stack  docker  containerization  deployment  containers  rkt  coreos  prod  monitoring  xooglers 
september 2015 by jm
CoreOS is building a container runtime, Rocket
Whoa, trouble at mill in Dockerland!
When Docker was first introduced to us in early 2013, the idea of a “standard container” was striking and immediately attractive: a simple component, a composable unit, that could be used in a variety of systems. The Docker repository included a manifesto of what a standard container should be. This was a rally cry to the industry, and we quickly followed. Brandon Philips, co-founder/CTO of CoreOS, became a top Docker contributor, and now serves on the Docker governance board. CoreOS is one of the most widely used platforms for Docker containers, and ships releases to the community hours after they happen upstream. We thought Docker would become a simple unit that we can all agree on.

Unfortunately, a simple re-usable component is not how things are playing out. Docker now is building tools for launching cloud servers, systems for clustering, and a wide range of functions: building images, running images, uploading, downloading, and eventually even overlay networking, all compiled into one monolithic binary running primarily as root on your server. The standard container manifesto was removed. We should stop talking about Docker containers, and start talking about the Docker Platform. It is not becoming the simple composable building block we had envisioned.
coreos  docker  linux  containers  open-source  politics  rocket 
december 2014 by jm

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