jm + conspiracy   3

People Think This Whole QAnon Conspiracy Theory Is A Prank On Trump Supporters
This, if true, is the most gloriously Discordian thing ever.
"Let us take for granted, for a while, that QAnon started as a prank in order to trigger right-wing weirdos and have a laugh at them. There's no doubt it has long become something very different. At a certain level it still sounds like a prank. But who's pulling it on whom?" they [Roberto Bui, Giovanni Cattabriga, and Federico Guglielmi] said.
q  conspiracy  politics  trump  qanon  luther-blissett  discordianism  wu-ming  funny  crazy 
6 days ago by jm
How my research on DNA ancestry tests became "fake news"
I was not surprised to see our research twisted by fake news and satire websites. Conspiracy theories are meant to be just as entertaining as they are convincing. They also provide a way out of confronting reality and reckoning with facts that don’t confirm preexisting worldviews. For white nationalists and racists, if test results showed traces of African American or Jewish ancestry, either the tests did not work, or the results were planted by some ideologically motivated scientists, or the tests were part of a global war against whites. With conspiracy theories, debunking is rarely useful because the individual is often searching for an interpretation that confirms their prior beliefs.

As such, DNA conspiracy theories allow white supremacists to plan new escape routes for the traps they laid for themselves long ago. With DNA testing, the one-drop rule—a belief made law in the 1900s that one drop of African blood makes one Black—becomes transmuted genealogically into the one-percent rule, according to which to remain racially white, an individual’s results must show no sign of African or Jewish origin. Through the genealogical lens, American white nationalists consider “one hundred percent European” as good results, which in turn substantiates their “birth right” to the United States as a marker of heredity and conquest.
racism  science  fake-news  conspiracy  genealogy  dna  dna-testing 
4 weeks ago by jm
David Robert Grimes on the flouride kerfuffle
Hilariously, "The Girl Against Flouride" and other antiflouridation campaigners now allege he's a undercover agent of Alcoa and/or Glaxo Smith Kline, rather than dealing with any awkwardly hostile realities
flouride  flouridation  david-robert-grimes  conspiracy  funny  science  ireland  alcoa  glaxo-smith-kline 
march 2014 by jm

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