jm + computers   10

hrvach/fpg1
a PDP-1 implementation in FPGA:

DEC PDP-1 is a computer designed and produced in 1959. Considering the pace of change in computing, that might seem like the prehistoric age. However, it is also surprisingly modern and proves a point that the basic concepts still withstand the test of time.

This project is trying to re-create this computer in FPGA and enable running the first real computer game, SpaceWar!, on a modern display and gamepad. It is designed to run on the MiSTer platform, a retro gaming system based on the Terasic DE10-Nano FPGA board.

The implementation is done in Verilog, a hardware description language specifying the structure and behavior of digital logic circuits. This is not a software emulation because there is no CPU executing it.

Since this is my first Verilog project ever and its purpose was to teach myself about FPGA, don't expect too much. Beginners often make mistakes or break best practice. Please keep this in mind. Advice and suggestions are welcome!
pdp1  history  computers  spacewar  fpga  hardware  verilog 
16 days ago by jm
The Embroidered Computer
an exploration into using historic gold embroidery materials and knowledge to craft a programmable 8 bit computer.

Solely built from a variety of metal threads, magnetic, glass and metal beads, and being inspired by traditional crafting routines and patterns, the piece questions the appearance of current digital and electronic technologies surrounding us, as well as our interaction with them.

Technically, the piece consists of (textile) relays, similar to early computers before the invention of semiconductors. Visually, the gold materials, here used for their conductive properties, arranged into specific patterns to fulfil electronic functions, dominate the work. Traditionally purely decorative, their pattern here defines they function. They lay bare core digital routines usually hidden in black boxes. Users are invited to interact with the piece in programming the textile to compute for them.
electronics  computers  computing  art  embroidery  craft  gold  8-bit 
5 weeks ago by jm
Mounir Mahjoub​i​, the 'geek' who saved Macron's campaign: 'We knew we were going to be attacked' | World news | The Guardian
What a great story.

As a child, he was into maths and geometry, the middle child with one sister 10 years older and another 10 years younger. “I heard about this incredible new thing called the internet,” he says, adding how, aged 12, he saw an advert for the Paris science museum where you could try the internet for free. “There were 15 computers and you queued to have an hour free if you bought an entry ticket. I bought an annual pass to the museum and every Saturday and Sunday I’d travel from one side of Paris to the other to get on the internet and see what it was about. I’d go on Yahoo, chat with people on the other side of the world. I didn’t speak great English then so it wasn’t brilliant chat ...”


(via Niall Murphy)
france  mounir-mahjoubi  internet  computers  society  macron  politics  security 
june 2017 by jm
A Mind Is Born
A C=64 demo in 256 bytes! Awesome work. Use of an LFSR number generator to create the melody is particularly clever (via Craig)
art  programming  computers  demos  demoscene  c-64  via:craig  lfsr  algorithms 
april 2017 by jm
Investigation finds inmates built computers and hid them in prison ceiling
Prisoners built computers from parts, hid them in the ceiling, and connected them to the administrative network. 'The Ohio Inspector General says investigators found an inmate used the computers to steal the identity of another inmate, and then submit credit card applications, and commit tax fraud. They also found inmates used the computers to create security clearance passes that gave them access to restricted areas.'
computers  prison  hacks  crime  ohio 
april 2017 by jm
_Could a Neuroscientist Understand a Microprocessor?_
'There is a popular belief in neuroscience that we are primarily data limited, that producing large, multimodal, and complex datasets will, enabled by data analysis algorithms, lead to fundamental insights into the way the brain processes information. Microprocessors are among those artificial information processing systems that are both complex and that we understand at all levels, from the overall logical flow, via logical gates, to the dynamics of transistors. Here we take a simulated classical microprocessor as a model organism, and use our ability to perform arbitrary experiments on it to see if popular data analysis methods from neuroscience can elucidate the way it processes information. We show that the approaches reveal interesting structure in the data but do not meaningfully describe the hierarchy of information processing in the processor. This suggests that current approaches in neuroscience may fall short of producing meaningful models of the brain.'

via Bryan O'Sullivan.
via:bos  neuroscience  microprocessors  6502  computers  hardware  wetware  brain  biology  neural-systems 
june 2016 by jm
Historic computers look super sexy in this new photo series by Docubyte and Ink
Wow, these look amazing:
The IBM 1401 and Alan Turing’s Pilot ACE (shown below) are among the computers featured in the series by photographer Docubyte and production studio Ink.
ibm  computers  history  tech  docubyte  ink  bletchley-park 
may 2016 by jm
Conor’s 2012 Raspberry Pi Christmas Gift Guide
Ah, memories! Wish my kiddies were old enough for one of these...

I really think this Christmas could be a lovely replay of 1982 for a lot of people, like me, who got their first home computer that year. You could have so much fun on Christmas Day messing with the RPi rather than falling asleep in front of the fire. Just don’t fight over who gets the telly when Doctor Who is on.

Whilst the bare-bones nature of the Raspberry Pi is wonderful, it is unusable out of the box unless you are a house with smartphones, digital cameras and existing PCs already that you can raid for components. What you want to avoid is a repeat of me that December in 1982 with my brand-new 16K ZX Spectrum which didn’t work on our Nordmende TV until two weeks later when the RTV Rentals guy came and replaced the TV Tuner. Two weeks typing Beep 1,2 to make sure it wasn’t broken.
raspberry-pi  gifts  computers  kids  hacking  education  gadgets  christmas 
november 2012 by jm
Hacker News | Ooops.
brilliant thread of epic "OMG WHAT HAVE I DONE" stories
fail  ouch  oops  via:hn  via:waxy  computers  software  rm-rf 
june 2011 by jm
XOR patent killed Commodore-Amiga
'Apparently Commodore-Amiga owed $10M for patent infringement. Because of that, the US government wouldn't allow any CD-32's into the USA. And because of that, the Phillippines factory seized all of the CD-32's that had been manufactured to cover unpaid expenses. And that was the end'
cd32  commodore  computers  history  ip  patents  software  swpats  xor  amiga  from delicious
july 2010 by jm

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