jm + comments   12

The Immortal Myths About Online Abuse – Humane Tech – Medium
After building online communities for two decades, we’ve learned how to fight abuse. It’s a solvable problem. We just have to stop repeating the same myths as excuses not to fix things.


Here are the 8 myths Anil Dash picks out:

1. False: You can’t fix abusive behavior online.

2. False: Fighting abuse hurts free speech!

3. False: Software can detect abuse using simple rules.

4. False: Most people say “abuse” when they just mean criticism.

5. False: We just need everybody to use their “real” name.

6. False: Just charge a dollar to comment and that’ll fix things.

7. False: You can call the cops! If it’s not illegal, it’s not harmful.

8. False: Abuse can be fixed without dedicated resources.
abuse  comments  community  harassment  racism  reddit  anil-dash  free-speech 
8 days ago by jm
NPR Website To Get Rid Of Comments
Sadly, this makes sense and I'd have to agree.
Mike Durio, of Phoenix, seemed to sum it up in an email to my office back in April. "Have you considered doing away with the comments sections, or tighter moderation?" he wrote. "The comments have devolved into the Punch-and-Judy-Fest of moronic, un-illuminating observations and petty insults I've seen on other pretty much every other Internet site that allows comments." He added, "This is not in keeping with NPR's take-a-step-back, take-a-deep-breath reporting," and noted, "Now, thread hijacking and personal insults are becoming the stock in trade. Frequent posters use the forums to duke it out with one another."

A user named Mary, from Raleigh, N.C., wrote to implore: "Remove the comments section from your articles. The rude, hateful, racist, judgmental comments far outweigh those who may want to engage in some intelligent sideline conversation about the actual subject of the article. I am appalled at the amount of 'free hate' that is found on a website that represents honest and unbiased reporting such as NPR. What are you really gaining from all of these rabid comments other than proof that a sad slice of humanity that preys on the weak while spreading their hate?"
abuse  comments  npr  racism  web  discussion 
august 2016 by jm
ECHR: Websites not liable for readers' comments
'Lawyers for [a Hungarian news] site said the comments concerned had been taken down as soon as they were flagged. They said making their clients liable for everything readers posted "would have serious adverse repercussions for freedom of expression and democratic openness in the age of Internet". The ECHR agreed. "Although offensive and vulgar, the incriminated comments did not constitute clearly unlawful speech; and they certainly did not amount to hate speech or incitement to violence," the judges wrote.'
echr  law  eu  legal  comments  index-hu  hungary 
february 2016 by jm
Huge Loss For Free Speech In Europe: Human Rights Court Says Sites Liable For User Comments | Techdirt
The ruling is terrible through and through. First off, it insists that the comments on the news story were clearly "hate speech" and that, as such, "did not require any linguistic or legal analysis since the remarks were on their face manifestly unlawful." To the court, this means that it's obvious such comments should have been censored straight out. That's troubling for a whole host of reasons at the outset, and highlights the problematic views of expressive freedom in Europe. Even worse, however, the Court then notes that freedom of expression is "interfered with" by this ruling, but it doesn't seem to care -- saying that it is deemed "necessary in a democratic society."


This is going to have massive chilling effects. Terrible ruling from the ECHR.
echr  freedom  via:tjmcintyre  law  europe  eu  comments  free-speech  censorship  hate-speech 
june 2015 by jm
The Double Identity of an "Anti-Semitic" Commenter
Hasbara out of control. This is utterly nuts.
His intricate campaign, which he has admitted to Common Dreams, included posting comments by a screen name, "JewishProgressive," whose purpose was to draw attention to and denounce the anti-Semitic comments that he had written under many other screen names. The deception was many-layered. At one point he had one of his characters charge that the anti-Semitic comments and the criticism of the anti-Semitic comments must be written by "internet trolls who have been known to impersonate anti-Semites in order to then double-back and accuse others of supporting anti-Semitism"--exactly what he was doing.
hasbara  israel  trolls  propaganda  web  racism  comments  anonymity  commondreams 
august 2014 by jm
European ruling raises questions over liability and online comment
'A recent ruling by the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) has called into question [...] the liability of media organisations for online comment.' Delfi, a news website in Estonia, found liable for a user's comments by the ECHR
echr  comments  news  web  law  regulation  estonia  delfi  liability  slander  defamation 
november 2013 by jm
Rob "b3ta" Manuel in Dublin next week
The Bottom Half Of The Internet -- "Racism; typos; filth; spam; ignorance; rage – that's all the bottom half of the internet is good for, right? Rob Manuel wants you to question the internet dictum, most beloved of high-profile columnists, that you should ignore all of the comments all of the time. The 'war on comments', he reckons, might just be an echo of a fourth estate that's having trouble adjusting to the idea of an unwashed public disagreeing with their sacred opinions. Sous les pavés, la plage."

On Tuesday, le cool Dublin & Pilcrow present SPIEL. Rob Manuel is the flashy animator behind B3ta and he's joined by Ed Melvin, who wants to educate you on 'The Unreal Engines' of virtual currencies and economies.
rob-manuel  b3ta  dublin  comments  internet  meetings  talks  lecool 
april 2013 by jm
Surprisingly Good Evidence That Real Name Policies Fail To Improve Comments
'Enough theorizing, there’s actually good evidence to inform the debate. For 4 years, Koreans enacted increasingly stiff real-name commenting laws, first for political websites in 2003, then for all websites receiving more than 300,000 viewers in 2007, and was finally tightened to 100,000 viewers a year later after online slander was cited in the suicide of a national figure. The policy, however, was ditched shortly after a Korean Communications Commission study found that it only decreased malicious comments by 0.9%. Korean sites were also inundated by hackers, presumably after valuable identities.

Further analysis by Carnegie Mellon’s Daegon Cho and Alessandro Acquisti, found that the policy actually increased the frequency of expletives in comments for some user demographics. While the policy reduced swearing and “anti-normative” behavior at the aggregate level by as much as 30%, individual users were not dismayed. “Light users”, who posted 1 or 2 comments, were most affected by the law, but “heavy” ones (11-16+ comments) didn’t seem to mind.

Given that the Commission estimates that only 13% of comments are malicious, a mere 30% reduction only seems to clean up the muddied waters of comment systems a depressingly negligent amount.

The finding isn’t surprising: social science researchers have long known that participants eventually begin to ignore cameras video taping their behavior. In other words, the presence of some phantom judgmental audience doesn’t seem to make us better versions of ourselves.'

(via Ronan Lyons)
anonymity  identity  policy  comments  privacy  politics  new-media  via:ronanlyons 
january 2013 by jm
good anti-deletionist comment thread on reddit/programming
Loved this great neologism: 'as with any small organization's politics, people with way more time (and insanity) to invest in trivial issues will always out-penis more casual people just trying to make a positive contribution.'
wiki  bitdecay  wikipedia  deletion  deletionpedia  reddit  comments  thread  discussion  moderation  community  neologisms  from delicious
february 2011 by jm
Radisson Blu Galway – I’d avoid for events « Damien Mulley
Damien shares his atrocious experiences with a Galway hotel, and (naturally) commenters from the hotel's IP address range pile on what looks like astroturf in the comments
comments  astroturf  radisson  galway  hotels  funny  events  customer-service  cluetrain  from delicious
april 2010 by jm

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