jm + comcast   8

How I doubled my Internet speed with OpenWRT
File under "silly network hacks":
Comcast has an initiative called Xfinity WiFi. When you rent a cable modem/router combo from Comcast (as one of my nearby neighbors apparently does), in addition to broadcasting your own WiFi network, it is kind enough to also broadcast “xfinitywifi,” a second “hotspot” network metered separately from your own.


By using his Buffalo WZR-HP-AG300H router's extra radio, he can load-balance across both his own paid-for connection, and the XFinity WiFi free one. ;)
comcast  diy  networking  openwrt  routing  home-network  hacks  xfinity-wifi  buffalo 
march 2015 by jm
Comcast Wi-Fi serving self-promotional ads via JavaScript injection | Ars Technica
Comcast is adding data into the broadband packet stream. In 2007, it was packets serving up disconnection commands. Today, Comcast is inserting JavaScript that is serving up advertisements, according to [Robb] Topolski, who reviewed Singel's data. "It's the duty of the service provider to pull packets without treating them or modifying them or injecting stuff or forging packets. None of that should be in the province of the service provider," he said. "Imagine every Web page with a Comcast bug in the lower righthand corner. It's the antithesis of what a service provider is supposed to do. We want Internet access, not another version of cable TV."


The company appears to be called Front Porch: http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2014/09/meet-the-tech-company-performing-ad-injections-for-big-cable/
comcast  ads  injection  security  javascript  http  network-neutrality  isps 
september 2014 by jm
Building a large scale CDN with Apache Traffic Server
via Ilya Grigorik: 'Great under-the-hood look at how Comcast built and operates their internal CDN for delivering video (on-demand + live). Some highlights: switched to own (open-source) stack; ~250 servers pushing ~1.5Pb of data/day with ~5Pb of storage capacity.'
cdn  comcast  video  presentations  apache  traffic-server  vod 
may 2014 by jm
Netflix comes out strongly against Comcast
In sum, Comcast is not charging Netflix for transit service. It is charging Netflix for access to its subscribers. Comcast also charges its subscribers for access to Internet content providers like Netflix. In this way, Comcast is double dipping by getting both its subscribers and Internet content providers to pay for access to each other.


FIGHT!
netflix  comcast  network-neutrality  cartels  competition  us-politics  business  isps 
april 2014 by jm
Sirius by Comcast
At Comcast, our applications need convenient, low-latency access to important reference datasets. For example, our XfinityTV websites and apps need to use entertainment-related data to serve almost every API or web request to our datacenters: information like what year Casablanca was released, or how many episodes were in Season 7 of Seinfeld, or when the next episode of the Voice will be airing (and on which channel!).

We traditionally managed this information with a combination of relational databases and RESTful web services but yearned for something simpler than the ORM, HTTP client, and cache management code our developers dealt with on a daily basis. As main memory sizes on commodity servers continued to grow, however, we asked ourselves: How can we keep this reference data entirely in RAM, while ensuring it gets updated as needed and is easily accessible to application developers?

The Sirius distributed system library is our answer to that question, and we're happy to announce that we've made it available as an open source project. Sirius is written in Scala and uses the Akka actor system under the covers, but is easily usable by any JVM-based language.

Also includes a Paxos implementation with "fast follower" read-only slave replication. ASL2-licensed open source.

The only thing I can spot to be worried about is speed of startup; they note that apps need to replay a log at startup to rebuild state, which can be slow if unoptimized in my experience.

Update: in a twitter conversation at https://twitter.com/jon_moore/status/459363751893139456 , Jon Moore indicated they haven't had problems with this even with 'datasets consuming 10-20GB of heap', and have 'benchmarked a 5-node Sirius ingest cluster up to 1k updates/sec write throughput.' That's pretty solid!
open-source  comcast  paxos  replication  read-only  datastores  storage  memory  memcached  redis  sirius  scala  akka  jvm  libraries 
april 2014 by jm
Internet Tolls And The Case For Strong Net Neutrality
Netflix CEO Reed Hastings blogs about the need for Net Neutrality:
Interestingly, there is one special case where no-fee interconnection is embraced by the big ISPs -- when they are connecting among themselves. They argue this is because roughly the same amount of data comes and goes between their networks. But when we ask them if we too would qualify for no-fee interconnect if we changed our service to upload as much data as we download** -- thus filling their upstream networks and nearly doubling our total traffic -- there is an uncomfortable silence. That's because the ISP argument isn't sensible. Big ISPs aren't paying money to services like online backup that generate more upstream than downstream traffic. Data direction, in other words, has nothing to do with costs. ISPs around the world are investing in high-speed Internet and most already practice strong net neutrality. With strong net neutrality, new services requiring high-speed Internet can emerge and become popular, spurring even more demand for the lucrative high-speed packages ISPs offer. With strong net neutrality, everyone avoids the kind of brinkmanship over blackouts that plague the cable industry and harms consumers. As the Wall Street Journal chart shows, we're already getting to the brownout stage. Consumers deserve better.
consumer  net-neutrality  comcast  netflix  protectionism  cartels  isps  us  congestion  capacity 
march 2014 by jm
Comcast’s deal with Netflix makes network neutrality obsolete
in a world where Netflix and Yahoo connect directly to residential ISPs, every Internet company will have its own separate pipe. And policing whether different pipes are equally good is a much harder problem than requiring that all of the traffic in a single pipe be treated the same. If it wanted to ensure a level playing field, the FCC would be forced to become intimately involved in interconnection disputes, overseeing who Verizon interconnects with, how fast the connections are and how much they can charge to do it.
verizon  comcast  internet  peering  networking  netflix  network-neutrality 
february 2014 by jm
Why YouTube buffers: The secret deals that make -- and break -- online video
Should ISPs be required to ensure they have sufficient upstream bandwidth to video sites like YouTube and Netflix?
"Verizon has chosen to sell its customers a product [Netflix] that they hope those customers don't actually use," Schaeffer said. "And when customers use it and request movies, they have not ensured there is adequate connectivity to get that video content back to their customers."
netflix  youtube  streaming  video  isps  net-neutrality  peering  comcast  bandwidth  upstream 
july 2013 by jm

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