jm + code   11

EPA opposed rules that would have exposed VW's cheating
[...] Two months ago, the EPA opposed some proposed measures that would help potentially expose subversive code like the so-called “defeat device” software VW allegedly used by allowing consumers and researchers to legally reverse-engineer the code used in vehicles. EPA opposed this, ironically, because the agency felt that allowing people to examine the software code in vehicles would potentially allow car owners to alter the software in ways that would produce more emissions in violation of the Clean Air Act. The issue involves the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DCMA), which prohibits anyone from working around “technological protection measures” that limit access to copyrighted works. The Library of Congress, which oversees copyrights, can issue exemptions to those prohibitions that would make it legal, for example, for researchers to examine the code to uncover security vulnerabilities.
dmca  volkswagen  vw  law  code  open-source  air-quality  diesel  cheating  regulation  us-politics 
september 2015 by jm
Facebook Infer
New static analysis goodnews, freshly open-sourced by Facebook:
Facebook Infer uses logic to do reasoning about a program's execution, but reasoning at this scale — for large applications built from millions of lines of source code — is hard. Theoretically, the number of possibilities that need to be checked is more than the number of estimated atoms in the observable universe. Furthermore, at Facebook our code is not a fixed artifact but an evolving system, updated frequently and concurrently by many developers. It is not unusual to see more than a thousand modifications to our mobile code submitted for review in a given day. The requirements on the program analyzer then become even more challenging because we expect a tool to report quickly on these code modifications — in the region of 10 minutes — to fit in with developers' workflow. Coping with this scale and velocity requires advanced mathematical techniques. Facebook Infer uses two such techniques: separation logic and bi-abduction.

Separation logic is a theory that allows Facebook Infer's analysis to reason about small, independent parts of the application storage, rather than having to consider the entirety of the memory potentially at every step. That would be a daunting task on modern processors with their large addressable virtual memories.

Bi-abduction is a logical inference technique that allows Facebook Infer to discover properties about the behavior of independent parts of the application code. By storing these properties between runs, Facebook Infer needs to analyze only the parts of the software that have changed, reusing the results of its previous analysis where it can.

By combining these approaches, our analyzer is able to find complex problems in modifications to an application built from millions of lines of code, in minutes.


(via Bryan O'Sullivan)
via:bos  infer  facebook  static-analysis  lint  code  java  ios  android  coding  bugs 
june 2015 by jm
Input: Fonts for Code
Non-monospaced coding fonts! I'm all in favour...
As writing and managing code becomes more complex, today’s sophisticated coding environments are evolving to include everything from breakpoint markers to code folding and syntax highlighting. The typography of code should evolve as well, to explore possibilities beyond one font style, one size, and one character width.
input  fonts  via:its  typography  code  coding  font  text  ide  monospace 
may 2015 by jm
error-prone - Catch common Java mistakes as compile-time errors
It's common for even the best programmers to make simple mistakes. And commonly, a refactoring which seems safe can leave behind code which will never do what's intended. We're used to getting help from the compiler, but it doesn't do much beyond static type checking. Using error-prone to augment the compiler's static analysis, you can catch more mistakes before they cost you time, or end up as bugs in production. We use error-prone in Google's Java build system to eliminate classes of serious bugs from entering our code, and we've open-sourced it, so you can too!
analysis  java  static-analysis  code  errors  bugs 
november 2013 by jm
memcached turns 10 years old
Well, apparently tomorrow, but close enough. Happy birthday to bradfitz' greatest creation and its wonderful slab allocator!
birthdays  code  via:alex-popescu  open-source  history  malloc  memory  caching  memcached 
may 2013 by jm
Rusty's API Design Manifesto
This classic came up in discussions yesterday...

In the Linux Kernel community Rusty Russell came up with a API rating scheme to help us determine if our API is sensible, or not.  It's a rating from -10 to 10, where 10 is perfect is -10 is hell. Unfortunately there are too many examples at the wrong end of the scale.
rusty-russell  quality  coding  kernel  linux  apis  design  code-reviews  code 
may 2013 by jm
Baklava code
'thin software layers don’t add much value, especially when you have many such layers piled on each other. Each layer has to be pushed onto your mental stack as you dive into the code. Furthermore, the layers of phyllo dough are permeable, allowing the honey to soak through. But software abstractions are best when they don’t leak. When you pile layer on top of layer in software, the layers are bound to leak.'
code  design  terminology  food  antipatterns 
december 2012 by jm
ChessBase.com - Chess News - A Gross Miscarriage of Justice in Computer Chess (part two)
An amazing article, via Nelson Minar -- careful examination of the evolution of chess programs over the past 8 years appears to show clear signs of code/algorithm copying and unauthorised reverse engineering -- by many of the developers. 'Dr Søren Riis of Queen Mary University in London shows how most programs (legally) profited from Fruit, and subsequently much more so from the (illegally) reverse engineered Rybka. Yet it is Vasik Rajlich who was investigated, found guilty of plagiarism, banned for life, stripped of his titles, and vilified in the international press – for a five-year-old alleged tournament rule violation. Ironic.'
chess  code  games  open-source  licensing  reverse-engineering  copyright  infringement  via:nelson 
january 2012 by jm
Lovelace's Leap
a great observation from jgc. 'Lovelace realized that even though a computer was, at its heart, a mathematical machine, it wasn't restricted to doing mathematics. She realized that a computer could be used to process other types of 'information' by having numbers represent anything else. She realized that a computer could handle text, or music, or practically anything. That's Lovelace's Leap.'
jgc  history  ada-lovelace  computing  software  information  code  babbage 
september 2011 by jm
Computer History Museum: MacPaint and QuickDraw source code
wow, great snapshot of computing history here. just wish the code was not locked away in a ZIP, and instead hyperlinked for readability. Also a working link would be nice too (via jgc)
via:jgc  apple  code  history  mac  source  bill-atkinson  macpaint  pascal  quickdraw  graphics  from delicious
july 2010 by jm

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