jm + cloud-computing   4

Schneier on Security: Blowback from the NSA Surveillance
Unintended consequences on US-focused governance of the internet and cloud computing:
Writing about the new Internet nationalism, I talked about the ITU meeting in Dubai last fall, and the attempt of some countries to wrest control of the Internet from the US. That movement just got a huge PR boost. Now, when countries like Russia and Iran say the US is simply too untrustworthy to manage the Internet, no one will be able to argue. We can't fight for Internet freedom around the world, then turn around and destroy it back home. Even if we don't see the contradiction, the rest of the world does.
internet  freedom  cloud-computing  amazon  google  hosting  usa  us-politics  prism  nsa  surveillance 
june 2013 by jm
Microsoft admits US government can access EU-based cloud data
interesting point from an MS Q&A back in 2011, quite relevant nowadays:
Q: Can Microsoft guarantee that EU-stored data, held in EU based datacenters, will not leave the European Economic Area under any circumstances — even under a request by the Patriot Act?

A: Frazer explained that, as Microsoft is a U.S.-headquartered company, it has to comply with local laws (the United States, as well as any other location where one of its subsidiary companies is based). Though he said that "customers would be informed wherever possible," he could not provide a guarantee that they would be informed — if a gagging order, injunction or U.S. National Security Letter permits it. He said: "Microsoft cannot provide those guarantees. Neither can any other company." While it has been suspected for some time, this is the first time Microsoft, or any other company, has given this answer. Any data which is housed, stored or processed by a company, which is a U.S. based company or is wholly owned by a U.S. parent company, is vulnerable to interception and inspection by U.S. authorities. 
microsoft  privacy  cloud-computing  eu  data-centers  data-protection  nsa  fisa  usa 
june 2013 by jm
'The Impact of Copyright Policy Changes on Venture Capital Investment in Cloud Computing Companies' [pdf]
'Our results suggest that the Cablevision decision, [which was widely seen as easing certain ambiguities surrounding intellectual property], led to additional incremental investment in U.S. cloud computing firms that ranged from $728 million to approximately $1.3 billion over the two-and-a-half years after the decision. When paired with the findings of the enhanced effects of VC investment relative to corporate investment, this may be the equivalent of $2 to $5 billion in traditional R&D investment.'

via Fred Logue.
via:fplogue  law  ip  copyright  policy  cablevision  funding  vc  cloud-computing  investment  legal  buffering 
march 2013 by jm
Storm and Hadoop: Convergence of Big-Data and Low-Latency Processing
Yahoo! are going big with Storm for their next-generation internal cloud platform:

'Yahoo! engineering teams are developing technologies to enable Storm applications and Hadoop applications to be hosted on a single cluster.

• We have enhanced Storm to support Hadoop style security mechanism (including Kerberos authentication), and thus enable Storm applications authorized to access Hadoop datasets on HDFS and HBase.
• Storm is being integrated into Hadoop YARN for resource management. Storm-on-YARN enables Storm applications to utilize the computation resources in our tens of thousands of Hadoop computation nodes. YARN is used to launch Storm application master (Nimbus) on demand, and enables Nimbus to request resources for Storm application slaves (Supervisors).'
yahoo  yarn  cloud-computing  private-clouds  big-data  latency  storm  hadoop  elastic-computing  hbase 
february 2013 by jm

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