jm + chat   8

Fraandship
Manish is definitely aware of how he and his other fraandship-seekers are perceived by Western women. But he says, “It’s a difficult problem to solve because men speaking to women they aren’t married to — or who aren’t in their families — isn’t usually allowed.” In fact, he later tells me that he’s spoken to very few women in his life, and that the internet has finally allowed him and others like him to speak to women without being worried about their parents or family finding out.

It’s this inexperience with women that leaves them defaulting to what they know best: “What we see in movies, [especially] Western movies.”

“We think if we talk about sex, or we try to act like people we see in films, we will be like them,” Manish explains. “So then, we get [upset] and confused when we’re blocked, or when these girls don’t talk back to us.”

Still, Manish and his friends are undeterred. Blocked or not, rejected or not, they continue to spend hours on other people’s Facebook and Twitter profiles, imagining what their lives are like — and how those lives could be theirs one day. “I will still go to America, or maybe London!” he says as we finish up our Skype call. “Soon, I will go. I do not want to stay here. I want to see the world. By [talking] to you, I’m already doing that.”
fraandship  fraands  south-asia  india  pakistan  internet  chat  dms 
11 weeks ago by jm
SXSW 2018: A Look Back at the 1960s PLATO Computing System - IEEE Spectrum
Author Brian Dear on how these terminals were designed for coursework, but students preferred to chat and play games [...]

“Out of the top 10 programs on PLATO running any day, most were games,” Dear says. “They used more CPU time than anything else.” In one popular game called Empire, players blast each other’s spaceships with phasers and torpedoes in order to take over planets.


And PLATO had code review built into the OS:

Another helpful feature that no longer exists was called Term Comment. It allowed users to leave feedback for developers and programmers at any place within a program where they spotted a typo or had trouble completing a task.

To do this, the user would simply open a comment box and leave a note right there on the screen. Term Comment would append the comment to the user’s place in the program so that the recipient could easily navigate to it and clearly see the problem, instead of trying to recreate it from scratch on their own system.

“That was immensely useful for developers,” Dear says. “If you were doing QA on software, you could quickly comment, and it would track exactly where the user left this comment. We never really got this on the Web, and it’s such a shame that we didn’t.”
plato  computing  history  chat  empire  gaming  code-review  coding  brian-dear 
march 2018 by jm
Slack 103: Communication and culture
Interesting note on some emergent Slack communications systems using emoji: "redirect raccoon", voting, and "I'm taking a look at this"
slack  communications  emojis  emoji  online  talk  chat 
october 2017 by jm
Bots won't replace apps. Better apps will replace apps
As I’ll explain, messenger apps’ apparent success in fulfilling such a surprising array of tasks does not owe to the triumph of “conversational UI.” What they’ve achieved can be much more instructively framed as an adept exploitation of Silicon Valley phone OS makers’ growing failure to fully serve users’ needs, particularly in other parts of the world. Chat apps have responded by evolving into “meta-platforms.” Many of the platform-like aspects they’ve taken on to plaster over gaps in the OS actually have little to do with the core chat functionality. Not only is “conversational UI” a red herring, but as we look more closely, we’ll even see places where conversational UI has breached its limits and broken down.
apps  bots  chatops  chat  ui  messaging  silicon-valley  agents  alexa  siri  phones 
april 2016 by jm
Slack's coming to Dublin
Butterfield insists that Slack improves on the basic messaging functionality offered by its predecessors. The company plans to expand from 100 employees to 250 this year, open an office in Dublin, and launch a version that supports large companies with multiple teams.
slack  messaging  chat  dublin  ireland  jobs  tech 
february 2015 by jm
appear.in
zero-install, one-click video chat, using WebRTC. nifty
conference  webrtc  chat  collaboration  video  google-chrome  conferencing 
february 2014 by jm
Grove
Hosted IRC, 20 users for $50/month. Useful now that Google have fecked up Chat entirely
irc  chat  collaboration  groupware  hosted-services 
july 2013 by jm
Tactical Chat: How the U.S. Military Uses IRC to Wage War
Excellent stuff. Lessons to be learned from this: IRC has some key features that mean it can be useful in this case.
1. simple text, everything supports it, no fancy UI clients are necessary;
2. resilient against lossy/transient/low-bandwidth/high-latency networks;
3. standards-compliant and "battle-hardened" (so to speak);
4. open-source/non-proprietary.
Despite the U.S. military’s massive spending each year on advanced communications technology, the use of simple text chat or tactical chat has outpaced other systems to become one of the most popular paths for communicating practical information on the battlefield.  Though the use of text chat by the U.S. military first began in the early 1990s, in recent years tactical chat has evolved into a “primary ‘comms’ path, having supplanted voice communications as the primary means of common operational picture (COP) updating in support of situational awareness.”  An article from January 2012 in the Air Land Sea Bulletin describes the value of tactical chat as an effective and immediate communications method that is highly effective in distributed, intermittent, low bandwidth environments which is particularly important with “large numbers of distributed warfighters” who must “frequently jump onto and off of a network” and coordinate with other coalition partners.  Text chat also provides “persistency in situational understanding between those leaving and those assuming command watch duties” enabling a persistent record of tactical decision making.
A 2006 thesis from the Naval Postgraduate School states that internet relay chat (IRC) is one of the most widely used chat protocols for military command and control (C2).  Software such as mIRC, a Windows-based chat client, or integrated systems in C2 equipment are used primarily in tactical conditions though efforts are underway to upgrade systems to newer protocols. 


(via JK)
via:jk  war  irc  chat  mirc  us-military  tactical-chat  distcomp  networking 
march 2013 by jm

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