jm + chaos-monkey   6

Chaos Engineering Upgraded
some details on Netflix's Chaos Monkey, Chaos Kong and other aspects of their availability/failover testing
architecture  aws  netflix  ops  chaos-monkey  chaos-kong  testing  availability  failover  ha 
september 2015 by jm
Henry Robinson on testing and fault discovery in distributed systems

'Let's talk about finding bugs in distributed systems for a bit.
These chaos monkey-style fault testing systems are all well and good, but by being application independent they're a very blunt instrument.
Particularly they make it hard to search the fault space for bugs in a directed manner, because they don't 'know' what the system is doing.
Application-aware scripting of faults in a dist. systems seems to be rarely used, but allows you to directly stress problem areas.
For example, if a bug manifests itself only when one RPC returns after some timeout, hard to narrow that down with iptables manipulation.
But allow a script to hook into RPC invocations (and other trace points, like DTrace's probes), and you can script very specific faults.
That way you can simulate cross-system integration failures, *and* write reproducible tests for the bugs they expose!
Anyhow, I've been doing this in Impala, and it's been very helpful. Haven't seen much evidence elsewhere.'
henry-robinson  testing  fault-discovery  rpc  dtrace  tracing  distributed-systems  timeouts  chaos-monkey  impala 
september 2015 by jm
Can Spark Streaming survive Chaos Monkey?
good empirical results on Spark's resilience to network/host outages in EC2
ec2  aws  emr  spark  resilience  ha  fault-tolerance  chaos-monkey  netflix 
march 2015 by jm
Vaurien, the Chaos TCP Proxy — Vaurien 1.8 documentation
Vaurien is basically a Chaos Monkey for your TCP connections. Vaurien acts as a proxy between your application and any backend. You can use it in your functional tests or even on a real deployment through the command-line.

Vaurien is a TCP proxy that simply reads data sent to it and pass it to a backend, and vice-versa. It has built-in protocols: TCP, HTTP, Redis & Memcache. The TCP protocol is the default one and just sucks data on both sides and pass it along.

Having higher-level protocols is mandatory in some cases, when Vaurien needs to read a specific amount of data in the sockets, or when you need to be aware of the kind of response you’re waiting for, and so on.

Vaurien also has behaviors. A behavior is a class that’s going to be invoked everytime Vaurien proxies a request. That’s how you can impact the behavior of the proxy. For instance, adding a delay or degrading the response can be implemented in a behavior.

Both protocols and behaviors are plugins, allowing you to extend Vaurien by adding new ones.

Last (but not least), Vaurien provides a couple of APIs you can use to change the behavior of the proxy live. That’s handy when you are doing functional tests against your server: you can for instance start to add big delays and see how your web application reacts.
proxy  tcp  vaurien  chaos-monkey  testing  functional-testing  failures  sockets  redis  memcache  http 
february 2015 by jm
Failure Friday: How We Ensure PagerDuty is Always Reliable
Basically, they run the kind of exercise which Jesse Robbins invented at Amazon -- "Game Days". Scarily, they do these on a Friday -- living dangerously!
game-days  testing  failure  devops  chaos-monkey  ops  exercises 
november 2013 by jm
Introducing Chaos to C*
Autoremediation, ie. auto-replacement, of Cassandra nodes in production at Netflix
ops  autoremediation  outages  remediation  cassandra  storage  netflix  chaos-monkey 
october 2013 by jm

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