jm + cep   17

Osso
"A modern standard for event-oriented data". Avro schema, events have time and type, schema is external and not part of the Avro stream.

'a modern standard for representing event-oriented data in high-throughput operational systems. It uses existing open standards for schema definition and serialization, but adds semantic meaning and definition to make integration between systems easy, while still being size- and processing-efficient.

An Osso event is largely use case agnostic, and can represent a log message, stack trace, metric sample, user action taken, ad display or click, generic HTTP event, or otherwise. Every event has a set of common fields as well as optional key/value attributes that are typically event type-specific.'
osso  events  schema  data  interchange  formats  cep  event-processing  architecture 
september 2016 by jm
Mining High-Speed Data Streams: The Hoeffding Tree Algorithm
This paper proposes a decision tree learner for data streams, the Hoeffding Tree algorithm, which comes with the guarantee that the learned decision tree is asymptotically nearly identical to that of a non-incremental learner using infinitely many examples. This work constitutes a significant step in developing methodology suitable for modern ‘big data’ challenges and has initiated a lot of follow-up research. The Hoeffding Tree algorithm has been covered in various textbooks and is available in several public domain tools, including the WEKA Data Mining platform.
hoeffding-tree  algorithms  data-structures  streaming  streams  cep  decision-trees  ml  learning  papers 
august 2015 by jm
The world beyond batch: Streaming 101 - O'Reilly Media
To summarize, in this post I’ve:

Clarified terminology, specifically narrowing the definition of “streaming” to apply to execution engines only, while using more descriptive terms like unbounded data and approximate/speculative results for distinct concepts often categorized under the “streaming” umbrella.

Assessed the relative capabilities of well-designed batch and streaming systems, positing that streaming is in fact a strict superset of batch, and that notions like the Lambda Architecture, which are predicated on streaming being inferior to batch, are destined for retirement as streaming systems mature.

Proposed two high-level concepts necessary for streaming systems to both catch up to and ultimately surpass batch, those being correctness and tools for reasoning about time, respectively.

Established the important differences between event time and processing time, characterized the difficulties those differences impose when analyzing data in the context of when they occurred, and proposed a shift in approach away from notions of completeness and toward simply adapting to changes in data over time.

Looked at the major data processing approaches in common use today for bounded and unbounded data, via both batch and streaming engines, roughly categorizing the unbounded approaches into: time-agnostic, approximation, windowing by processing time, and windowing by event time.
streaming  batch  big-data  lambda-architecture  dataflow  event-processing  cep  millwheel  data  data-processing 
august 2015 by jm
AWS Lambda Event-Driven Architecture With Amazon SNS
Any message posted to an SNS topic can trigger the execution of custom code you have written, but you don’t have to maintain any infrastructure to keep that code available to listen for those events and you don’t have to pay for any infrastructure when the code is not being run. This is, in my opinion, the first time that Amazon can truly say that AWS Lambda is event-driven, as we now have a central, independent, event management system (SNS) where any authorized entity can trigger the event (post a message to a topic) and any authorized AWS Lambda function can listen for the event, and neither has to know about the other.
aws  ec2  lambda  sns  events  cep  event-processing  coding  cloud  hacks  eric-hammond 
april 2015 by jm
RADStack - an open source Lambda Architecture built on Druid, Kafka and Samza
'In this paper we presented the RADStack, a collection of complementary technologies that can be used together to power interactive analytic applications. The key pieces of the stack are Kafka, Samza, Hadoop, and Druid. Druid is designed for exploratory analytics and is optimized for low latency data exploration, aggregation, and ingestion, and is well suited for OLAP workflows. Samza and Hadoop complement Druid and add data processing functionality, and Kafka enables high throughput event delivery.'
druid  samza  kafka  streaming  cep  lambda-architecture  architecture  hadoop  big-data  olap 
april 2015 by jm
All Data Are Belong to AWS: Streaming upload via Fluentd
Fluentd looks like a decent foundation for tailing/streaming event processing in Ruby, supporting batched output to S3 and a bunch of other AWS services, Kafka, and RabbitMQ for output. Claims to have ok performance, despite its Rubbitude. However, its high-availability story is shite, so not to be used where availability is important
ruby  rabbitmq  kafka  tail  event-streaming  cep  event-processing  s3  aws  sqs  fluentd 
august 2014 by jm
dgryski/go-gk
A Go implementation of Greenwald-Khanna streaming quantiles: http://infolab.stanford.edu/~datar/courses/cs361a/papers/quantiles.pdf - 'a new online algorithm for computing approximate quantile summaries of very large data sequences with a worst-case space requirement of O(1/e log eN))'
quantiles  go  algorithms  greenwald-khanna  percentiles  streaming  cep  space-efficient 
july 2014 by jm
Spark Streaming
an extension of the core Spark API that allows enables high-throughput, fault-tolerant stream processing of live data streams. Data can be ingested from many sources like Kafka, Flume, Twitter, ZeroMQ or plain old TCP sockets and be processed using complex algorithms expressed with high-level functions like map, reduce, join and window. Finally, processed data can be pushed out to filesystems, databases, and live dashboards. In fact, you can apply Spark’s in-built machine learning algorithms, and graph processing algorithms on data streams.
spark  streams  stream-processing  cep  scalability  apache  machine-learning  graphs 
may 2014 by jm
Grape
a realtime processing engine, built on a persistent queue and a set of workers. 'The main goal is data availability and persistency. We created grape for those who cannot afford losing data'. It does this by allowing infinite expansion of the pending queue in Elliptics, their Dynamo-like horizontally-scaled storage backend.
kafka  queue  queueing  storage  realtime  fault-tolerance  grape  cep  event-processing 
november 2013 by jm
Storm at spider.io - London Storm Meetup 2013-06-18
Not just a Storm success story. Interesting slides indicating where a startup *stopped* using Storm as realtime wasn't useful to their customers
storm  realtime  hadoop  cascading  python  cep  spider.io  anti-spam  events  architecture  distcomp  low-latency  slides  rabbitmq 
october 2013 by jm
Behind the Screens at Loggly
Boost ASIO at the front end (!), Kafka 0.8, Storm, and ElasticSearch
boost  scalability  loggly  logging  ingestion  cep  stream-processing  kafka  storm  architecture  elasticsearch 
september 2013 by jm
_MillWheel: Fault-Tolerant Stream Processing at Internet Scale_ [paper, pdf]
from VLDB 2013:

MillWheel is a framework for building low-latency data-processing applications that is widely used at Google. Users specify a directed computation graph and application code for individual nodes, and the system manages persistent state and the continuous flow of records, all within the envelope of the framework’s fault-tolerance guarantees.

This paper describes MillWheel’s programming model as well as its implementation. The case study of a continuous anomaly detector in use at Google serves to motivate how many of MillWheel’s features are used. MillWheel’s programming model provides a notion of logical time, making it simple to write time-based aggregations. MillWheel was designed from the outset with fault tolerance and scalability in mind. In practice, we find that MillWheel’s unique combination of scalability, fault tolerance, and a versatile programming model lends itself to a wide variety of problems at Google.
millwheel  google  data-processing  cep  low-latency  fault-tolerance  scalability  papers  event-processing  stream-processing 
august 2013 by jm
HyperLogLog++: Google’s Take On Engineering HLL
Google and AggregateKnowledge's improvements to the HyperLogLog cardinality estimation algorithm
hyperloglog  cardinality  estimation  streaming  stream-processing  cep 
february 2013 by jm
clearspring / stream-lib
ASL-licensed open source library of stream-processing/approximation algorithms: count-min sketch, space-saving top-k, cardinality estimation, LogLog, HyperLogLog, MurmurHash, lookup3 hash, Bloom filters, q-digest, stochastic top-k
algorithms  coding  streams  cep  stream-processing  approximation  probabilistic  space-saving  top-k  cardinality  estimation  bloom-filters  q-digest  loglog  hyperloglog  murmurhash  lookup3 
february 2013 by jm
'Efficient Computation of Frequent and Top-k Elements in Data Streams' [paper, PDF]
The Space-Saving algorithm to compute top-k in a stream. I've been asking a variation of this problem as an interview question for a while now, pretty cool to find such a neat solution. Pity neither myself nor anyone I've interviewed has come up with it ;)
space-saving  approximation  streams  stream-processing  cep  papers  pdf  algorithms 
february 2013 by jm
Data distribution in the cloud with Node.js
Very interesting presentation from ex-IONAian Darach Ennis of Push Technology on eep.js, embedded event processing in Javascript for node.js stream processing. Handles tumbling, monotonic, periodic and sliding windows at 8-40 million events per second; no multi-dimensional, infinite or predicate event-processing windows. (via Sergio Bossa)
via:sbtourist  events  event-processing  streaming  data  ex-iona  darach-ennis  push-technology  cep  javascript  node.js  streams 
october 2012 by jm

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