jm + cctlds   3

Chris's Wiki :: blog/sysadmin/UnderstandingIODNSIssue
On the ns-a1.io security screwup for the .io CCTLD:
Using data from glue records instead of looking things up yourself is common but not mandatory, and there are various reasons why a resolver would not do so. Some recursive DNS servers will deliberately try to check glue record information as a security measure; for example, Unbound has the harden-referral-path option (via Tony Finch). Since the original article reported seeing real .io DNS queries being directed to Bryant's DNS server, we know that a decent number of clients were not using the root zone glue records. Probably a lot more clients were still using the glue records, through.


(via Tony Finch)
via:fanf  dns  security  dot-io  cctlds  glue-records  delegation 
12 days ago by jm
Confusion reigns over three “hijacked” ccTLDs
This kind of silliness is only likely to increase as the number of TLDs increases (and they become more trivial).
What seems to be happening here is that [two companies involved] have had some kind of dispute, and that as a result the registrants and the reputation of three countries’ ccTLDs have been harmed. Very amateurish.
tlds  domains  via:fanf  amateur-hour  dns  cctlds  registrars  adamsnames 
march 2013 by jm
The Background Dope on DHS Recent Seizure of Domains
according to this, the US Dept of Homeland Security is "seizing" domains through a back-channel to Verisign, since they directly control the .com TLD's nameservers. Expect to see dodgy sites start using non-US TLDs, names in multiple TLDs a la Pirate Bay, and eventually IPs instead of DNS records
tlds  dns  security  dhs  seizure  domains  cctlds  filesharing  icann  immixgroup  from delicious
december 2010 by jm

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