jm + cars   38

Dublin Cycling Campaign traffic survey finds twice as many cyclists as car passengers during rush hour
There are twice as many people cycling as there are people in cars on the quays in Dublin at the morning rush hour, a video survey by the Dublin Cycling Campaign has found.


This doesn't surprise me at all -- I would be in that number too, except I now avoid the quays as they are too dangerous to cycle on due to the heavy traffic! A segregated cycle route is greatly needed.
cycling  dublin  safety  cars  driving  dublin-cycling-campaign  liffey-cycle-route 
11 weeks ago by jm
NTSB: Autopilot steered Tesla car toward traffic barrier before deadly crash
This is the Tesla self-crashing car in action. Remember how it works. It visually recognizes rear ends of cars using a BW camera and Mobileye (at least in early models) vision software. It also recognizes lane lines and tries to center between them. It has a low resolution radar system which ranges moving metallic objects like cars but ignores stationary obstacles. And there are some side-mounted sonars for detecting vehicles a few meters away on the side, which are not relevant here.

The system performed as designed. The white lines of the gore (the painted wedge) leading to this very shallow off ramp become far enough apart that they look like a lane.[1] If the vehicle ever got into the gore area, it would track as if in a lane, right into the crash barrier. It won't stop for the crash barrier, because it doesn't detect stationary obstacles. Here, it sped up, because there was no longer a car ahead. Then it lane-followed right into the crash barrier.

That's the fundamental problem here. These vehicles will run into stationary obstacles at full speed with no warning or emergency braking at all. That is by design. This is not an implementation bug or sensor failure. It follows directly from the decision to ship "Autopilot" with that sensor suite and set of capabilities.
tesla  fail  safety  self-driving  autopilot  cars  driving  sonar  radar  sensors  ai 
june 2018 by jm
Twitter thread: "People still talk about charging speed like it's a long-term obstacle for electric cars. It's not, for several reasons"
great thread on EV futures. Range anxiety is rapidly dwindling and they are the way of the future for sure
evs  cars  driving  batteries  bevs 
may 2018 by jm
plugin EVs outsell ICE-driven cars in Norway
56% of cars registered in March 2018 in Norway were plugin EVs rather than fossil-fuel burning ICE vehicles, with Nissan Leafs well in first place
evs  pevs  nissan  cars  driving  norway  green  ev 
april 2018 by jm
Charging the LEAF | Speak EV - Electric Car Forums
Excellent reference on charge times and connection types for the Nissan Leaf EV
nissan  leaf  ev  cars  charging  nissan-leaf 
march 2018 by jm
30 kWh Leaf Nissan Connect Issues
seems there's some kind of firmware/importation issue with the Nissan Leaf app integration.... bit of a mess
nissan-leaf  nissan  leaf  apps  mobile  cars  driving 
february 2018 by jm
Car Hacker's Handbook

Modern cars are more computerized than ever. Infotainment and navigation systems, Wi-Fi, automatic software updates, and other innovations aim to make driving more ­convenient. But vehicle technologies haven't kept pace with today's more hostile security environment, leaving ­millions vulnerable to attack.

The Car Hacker's Handbook will give you a deeper understanding of the computer systems and embedded software in modern ­vehicles. It begins by examining vulnerabilities and providing detailed explanations of communications over the CAN bus and ­between devices and systems.

Then, once you have an understanding of a vehicle's communication network, you'll learn how to intercept data and perform specific hacks to track vehicles, unlock doors, glitch engines, flood communication, and more.


Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike license.
cars  books  hacking  exploits  can-bus 
february 2018 by jm
My £300 32Amp Charging Station Install
good writeup of a DIY EV car charger install
ev  cars  diy  car-chargers  home 
january 2018 by jm
[1801.02780] Rogue Signs: Deceiving Traffic Sign Recognition with Malicious Ads and Logos
Well, so much for that idea.
We propose a new real-world attack against the computer vision based systems of autonomous vehicles (AVs). Our novel Sign Embedding attack exploits the concept of adversarial examples to modify innocuous signs and advertisements in the environment such that they are classified as the adversary's desired traffic sign with high confidence. Our attack greatly expands the scope of the threat posed to AVs since adversaries are no longer restricted to just modifying existing traffic signs as in previous work. Our attack pipeline generates adversarial samples which are robust to the environmental conditions and noisy image transformations present in the physical world. We ensure this by including a variety of possible image transformations in the optimization problem used to generate adversarial samples. We verify the robustness of the adversarial samples by printing them out and carrying out drive-by tests simulating the conditions under which image capture would occur in a real-world scenario. We experimented with physical attack samples for different distances, lighting conditions, and camera angles. In addition, extensive evaluations were carried out in the virtual setting for a variety of image transformations. The adversarial samples generated using our method have adversarial success rates in excess of 95% in the physical as well as virtual settings.
signs  road-safety  roads  traffic  self-driving-cars  cars  avs  security  machine-learning  computer-vision  ai 
january 2018 by jm
Collision Course: Why This Type Of Road Junction Will Keep Killing Cyclists
This aspect of road design had never occurred to me, but once explained it makes sense. Great article on the design of an oblique crossroads junction and how it's unexpectedly dangerous due to human factors and car design.
“Human error” may be real, but so are techniques to mitigate or eliminate its effects — and driver training is poor when it comes to equipping people with those techniques, let alone habituating them. (And let alone reviewing knowledge of those techniques every few years.)
cars  cycling  road-safety  safety  accidents  traffic  junctions  road-design  design  human-error  human-factors 
january 2018 by jm
These stickers make AI hallucinate things that aren’t there - The Verge
The sticker “allows attackers to create a physical-world attack without prior knowledge of the lighting conditions, camera angle, type of classifier being attacked, or even the other items within the scene.” So, after such an image is generated, it could be “distributed across the Internet for other attackers to print out and use.”

This is why many AI researchers are worried about how these methods might be used to attack systems like self-driving cars. Imagine a little patch you can stick onto the side of the motorway that makes your sedan think it sees a stop sign, or a sticker that stops you from being identified up by AI surveillance systems. “Even if humans are able to notice these patches, they may not understand the intent [and] instead view it as a form of art,” the researchers write.
self-driving  cars  ai  adversarial-classification  security  stickers  hacks  vision  surveillance  classification 
january 2018 by jm
Electric Vehicle Home Charger Grant
new SEAI grant for EV charger points; allows second-hand cars as well, from 2018 onwards
cars  driving  seai  grants  ireland  evs 
december 2017 by jm
extremely detailed writeup on a secondhand Nissan LEAF
'2015 Nissan LEAF, 24kWh Acenta model' -- with specifics of cost, usage in Ireland, charging times, etc. Super-detailed!
nissan  leaf  secondhand  driving  cars  evs 
december 2017 by jm
Driverless shuttle in Las Vegas gets in fender bender within an hour
Like any functioning autonomous vehicle, the shuttle can avoid obstacles and stop in a hurry if needed. What it apparently can’t do is move a couple feet out of the way when it looks like a 20-ton truck is going to back into it.

A passenger interviewed by KSNV shared her frustration:

The shuttle just stayed still and we were like, ‘oh my gosh, it’s gonna hit us, it’s gonna hit us!’ and then.. it hit us! And the shuttle didn’t have the ability to move back, either. Like, the shuttle just stayed still.
ai  driverless-cars  driving  cars  las-vegas  aaa  navya  keolis 
november 2017 by jm
EV Purchase and Import Guide
Importing an EV from the UK into Ireland (specifically the Nissan Leaf). A little dated (2013) but possibly useful all the same
ev  cars  driving  uk  import  nissan-leaf 
october 2017 by jm
Anthony Levandowski has founded an AI religion
In September 2015, the multi-millionaire engineer at the heart of the patent and trade secrets lawsuit between Uber and Waymo, Google’s self-driving car company, founded a religious organization called Way of the Future. Its purpose, according to previously unreported state filings, is nothing less than to “develop and promote the realization of a Godhead based on Artificial Intelligence.”


this article is full of bananas.
google  crazy  uber  waymo  self-driving-cars  cars  religion  way-of-the-future  ai  god 
september 2017 by jm
How they did it: an analysis of emissions defeat devices in modern automobiles
Using CurveDiff, the team analysed 963 firmware images, for which analysis completed successfully for 924. 406 of the analysed images contained a defeat device, out of which 333 contained at least one active profile. In at least 268 images, the test detection affects the EGR. Firmware images released on Dec 3rd 2014 are used in VW Passat cars, and include the refinement to the defeat device to detect steering wheel angle that we discussed previously.
cars  driving  emissions  diesel  volkswagen  law  regulation  firmware  reverse-engineering 
june 2017 by jm
V2V and the challenge of cooperating technology
A great deal of effort and attention has gone into a mobile data technology that you may not be aware of. This is "Vehicle to Vehicle" (V2V) communication designed so that cars can send data to other cars. There is special spectrum allocated at 5.9ghz, and a protocol named DSRC, derived from wifi, exists for communications from car-to-car and also between cars and roadside transmitters in the infrastructure, known as V2I.

This effort has been going on for some time, but those involved have had trouble finding a compelling application which users would pay for. Unable to find one, advocates hope that various national governments will mandate V2V radios in cars in the coming years for safety reasons. In December 2016, the U.S. Dept. of Transportation proposed just such a mandate. [....] "Connected Autonomous Vehicles -- Pick 2."
cars  self-driving  autonomous-vehicles  v2v  wireless  connectivity  networking  security 
may 2017 by jm
Physical separation of cyclists from traffic “crucial” to dropping injury rates, shows U.S. study
Citing a further study of differing types of cycling infrastructure in Canada, the editorial writes that an 89% increase in safety was noted on streets with physical separation over streets where no such infrastructure existed. Unprotected cycling space was found to be 53% safer.

In 2014 there were 902 recorded cyclists fatalities in America and 35,206 serious injuries. Per kilometre cycled fatalities per 100 million kilometres cycled sat at 4.7. In the Netherlands and Denmark those rates sit at 1 and 1.1, respectively.
cycling  infrastructure  roads  safety  accidents  cars  statistics  us  canada 
may 2017 by jm
Toyota's Gill Pratt: "No one is close to achieving true level 5 [self-driving cars]"
The most important thing to understand is that not all miles are the same. Most miles that we drive are very easy, and we can drive them while daydreaming or thinking about something else or having a conversation. But some miles are really, really hard, and so it’s those difficult miles that we should be looking at: How often do those show up, and can you ensure on a given route that the car will actually be able to handle the whole route without any problem at all? Level 5 autonomy says all miles will be handled by the car in an autonomous mode without any need for human intervention at all, ever.

So if we’re talking to a company that says, “We can do full autonomy in this pre-mapped area and we’ve mapped almost every area,” that’s not Level 5. That’s Level 4. And I wouldn’t even stop there: I would ask, “Is that at all times of the day, is it in all weather, is it in all traffic?” And then what you’ll usually find is a little bit of hedging on that too. The trouble with this Level 4 thing, or the “full autonomy” phrase, is that it covers a very wide spectrum of possible competencies. It covers “my car can run fully autonomously in a dedicated lane that has no other traffic,” which isn’t very different from a train on a set of rails, to “I can drive in Rome in the middle of the worst traffic they ever have there, while it’s raining," which is quite hard.

Because the “full autonomy” phrase can mean such a wide range of things, you really have to ask the question, “What do you really mean, what are the actual circumstances?” And usually you’ll find that it’s geofenced for area, it may be restricted by how much traffic it can handle, for the weather, the time of day, things like that. So that’s the elaboration of why we’re not even close.
autonomy  driving  self-driving  cars  ai  robots  toyota  weather 
january 2017 by jm
Self-driving cars: overlooking data privacy is a car crash waiting to happen
Interesting point -- self-driving cars are likely to be awash in telemetry data, "phoned home"
self-driving  cars  vehicles  law  data  privacy  data-privacy  surveillance 
july 2016 by jm
Troy Hunt: Controlling vehicle features of Nissan LEAFs across the globe via vulnerable APIs
holy crap. Nissan expose a public API authenticated _solely_ using the car's VIN -- which is more or less public info; the API allows turning on/off AC, grabbing driving history, etc.
security  fail  nissan  leaf  cars  apis  vin  authentication 
february 2016 by jm
Floating car data
Floating car data (FCD), also known as floating cellular data, is a method to determine the traffic speed on the road network. It is based on the collection of localization data, speed, direction of travel and time information from mobile phones in vehicles that are being driven. These data are the essential source for traffic information and for most intelligent transportation systems (ITS). This means that every vehicle with an active mobile phone acts as a sensor for the road network. Based on these data, traffic congestion can be identified, travel times can be calculated, and traffic reports can be rapidly generated. In contrast to traffic cameras, number plate recognition systems, and induction loops embedded in the roadway, no additional hardware on the road network is necessary.
surveillance  cars  driving  mobile-phones  phones  travel  gsm  monitoring  anpr  alpr  traffic 
november 2015 by jm
Three quarters of cars stolen in France 'electronically hacked' - Telegraph
The astonishing figures come two months after computer scientists in the UK warned that thousands of cars – including high-end brands such as Porsches and Maseratis - are at risk of electronic hacking. Their research was suppressed for two years by a court injunction for fear it would help thieves steal vehicles to order. The kit required to carry out such “mouse jacking”, as the French have coined the practice, can be freely purchased on the internet for around £700 and the theft of a range of models can be pulled off “within minutes,” motor experts warn.
hacking  security  security-through-obscurity  mouse-jacking  cars  safety  theft  crime  france  smart-cars 
november 2015 by jm
ustwo Reimagines the In-Car Cluster
Designers behind the cult mobile game, Monument Valley, take on the legacy-bound in-car UI
ux  ui  cars  driving  safety  ustwo  monument-valley  speed 
september 2015 by jm
background doc on the Jeep hack
"Remote Exploitation of an Unaltered Passenger Vehicle", by Dr. Charlie Miller (cmiller@openrce.org) and Chris Valasek (cvalasek@gmail.com). QNX, unauthenticated D-Bus, etc.

'Since a vehicle can scan for other vulnerable vehicles and the exploit doesn’t require any user interaction, it would be possible to write a worm. This worm would scan for vulnerable vehicles, exploit them with their payload which would scan for other vulnerable vehicles, etc. This is really interesting and scary. Please don’t do this. Please.'
jeep  hacks  exploits  d-bus  qnx  cars  safety  risks 
august 2015 by jm
HACKERS REMOTELY KILL A JEEP ON THE HIGHWAY—WITH ME IN IT
Jaysus, this is terrifying.
Miller and Valasek’s full arsenal includes functions that at lower speeds fully kill the engine, abruptly engage the brakes, or disable them altogether. The most disturbing maneuver came when they cut the Jeep’s brakes, leaving me frantically pumping the pedal as the 2-ton SUV slid uncontrollably into a ditch.


Avoid any car which supports this staggeringly-badly-conceived Uconnect feature:

All of this is possible only because Chrysler, like practically all carmakers, is doing its best to turn the modern automobile into a smartphone. Uconnect, an Internet-connected computer feature in hundreds of thousands of Fiat Chrysler cars, SUVs, and trucks, controls the vehicle’s entertainment and navigation, enables phone calls, and even offers a Wi-Fi hot spot.


:facepalm:

Also, Chrysler's response sucks: "Chrysler’s patch must be manually implemented via a USB stick or by a dealership mechanic."
hacking  security  cars  driving  safety  brakes  jeeps  chrysler  fiat  uconnect  can-bus  can 
july 2015 by jm
Self-driving cars drive like your grandma
'Honestly, I don't think it will take long for other drivers to realize that self-driving cars are "easy targets" in traffic.' -- also, an insurance expert suggests that self-driving cars won't increase premiums
driving  google  cars  traffic  social  insurance 
july 2015 by jm
Volvo says horrible 'self-parking car accident' happened because driver didn't have 'pedestrian detection'
Grim meathook future, courtesy of Volvo:
“The Volvo XC60 comes with City Safety as a standard feature however this does not include the Pedestrian detection functionality [...] The pedestrian detection feature [...] costs approximately $3,000.


However, there's another lesson here, in crappy car UX and the risks thereof:
But even if it did have the feature, Larsson says the driver would have interfered with it by the way they were driving and “accelerating heavily towards the people in the video.” “The pedestrian detection would likely have been inactivated due to the driver inactivating it by intentionally and actively accelerating,” said Larsson. “Hence, the auto braking function is overrided by the driver and deactivated.” Meanwhile, the people in the video seem to ignore their instincts and trust that the car assumed to be endowed with artificial intelligence knows not to hurt them. It is a sign of our incredible faith in the power of technology, but also, it’s a reminder that companies making AI-assisted vehicles need to make safety features standard and communicate clearly when they aren’t.
self-driving-cars  cars  ai  pedestrian  computer-vision  volvo  fail  accidents  grim-meathook-future 
may 2015 by jm
Keeping Your Car Safe From Electronic Thieves - NYTimes.com
In a normal scenario, when you walk up to a car with a keyless entry and try the door handle, the car wirelessly calls out for your key so you don’t have to press any buttons to get inside. If the key calls back, the door unlocks. But the keyless system is capable of searching for a key only within a couple of feet. Mr. Danev said that when the teenage girl turned on her device, it amplified the distance that the car can search, which then allowed my car to talk to my key, which happened to be sitting about 50 feet away, on the kitchen counter. And just like that, open sesame.


What the hell -- who designed a system that would auto-unlock based on signal strength alone?!!
security  fail  cars  keys  signal  proximity  keyless-entry  prius  toyota  crime  amplification  power-amplifiers  3db  keyless 
april 2015 by jm
Hailo pulling in EUR1M per month in Dublin alone
based on these (pretty rough) estimates. Good going, I'm a massive fan
hailo  taxis  driving  cars  public-transport  dublin  b2c  b2b 
june 2014 by jm
Google: Our Robot Cars Are Better Drivers Than Puny Humans | MIT Technology Review
One of those analyses showed that when a human was behind the wheel, Google’s cars accelerated and braked significantly more sharply than they did when piloting themselves. Another showed that the cars’ software was much better at maintaining a safe distance from the vehicle ahead than the human drivers were. “We’re spending less time in near-collision states,” said Urmson. “Our car is driving more smoothly and more safely than our trained professional drivers.”
google  cars  driving  safety  roads  humans  robots  automation 
october 2013 by jm
The Ethics of Autonomous Cars
Sometimes good judgment can compel us to act illegally. Should a self-driving vehicle get to make that same decision?
ethics  stories  via:chris-horn  the-atlantic  driving  cars  law  robots  self-driving-vehicles 
october 2013 by jm
Stayhold
a completely new patent pending product designed in Ireland that is going to change the way people use their cars for carrying goods.  It is a solid plastic product that grips the carpet in your car and acts as a barrier to hold loose items securely against the side wall in your car trunk or boot.


Found out about this online -- a US-based acquaintance raving about them being worth the shipping from Ireland. nice work!
stayhold  transportation  cars  boot  gadgets  toget 
july 2013 by jm
Stats from an Irish guy's EV driving
EUR 529.07 over ~4000 miles in his Nissan Leaf; that works out as a yearly savings of EUR 1587.21. not to be sniffed at -- although what's the premium for a Leaf over a standard diesel?
ev  cars  driving  nissan  economy  ireland  fuel  prices 
march 2012 by jm
GoCar
pay as you go car-sharing and short-term car rental in Dublin
cars  travel  dublin  ireland  from delicious
november 2010 by jm

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