jm + cars   20

V2V and the challenge of cooperating technology
A great deal of effort and attention has gone into a mobile data technology that you may not be aware of. This is "Vehicle to Vehicle" (V2V) communication designed so that cars can send data to other cars. There is special spectrum allocated at 5.9ghz, and a protocol named DSRC, derived from wifi, exists for communications from car-to-car and also between cars and roadside transmitters in the infrastructure, known as V2I.

This effort has been going on for some time, but those involved have had trouble finding a compelling application which users would pay for. Unable to find one, advocates hope that various national governments will mandate V2V radios in cars in the coming years for safety reasons. In December 2016, the U.S. Dept. of Transportation proposed just such a mandate. [....] "Connected Autonomous Vehicles -- Pick 2."
cars  self-driving  autonomous-vehicles  v2v  wireless  connectivity  networking  security 
13 days ago by jm
Physical separation of cyclists from traffic “crucial” to dropping injury rates, shows U.S. study
Citing a further study of differing types of cycling infrastructure in Canada, the editorial writes that an 89% increase in safety was noted on streets with physical separation over streets where no such infrastructure existed. Unprotected cycling space was found to be 53% safer.

In 2014 there were 902 recorded cyclists fatalities in America and 35,206 serious injuries. Per kilometre cycled fatalities per 100 million kilometres cycled sat at 4.7. In the Netherlands and Denmark those rates sit at 1 and 1.1, respectively.
cycling  infrastructure  roads  safety  accidents  cars  statistics  us  canada 
14 days ago by jm
Toyota's Gill Pratt: "No one is close to achieving true level 5 [self-driving cars]"
The most important thing to understand is that not all miles are the same. Most miles that we drive are very easy, and we can drive them while daydreaming or thinking about something else or having a conversation. But some miles are really, really hard, and so it’s those difficult miles that we should be looking at: How often do those show up, and can you ensure on a given route that the car will actually be able to handle the whole route without any problem at all? Level 5 autonomy says all miles will be handled by the car in an autonomous mode without any need for human intervention at all, ever.

So if we’re talking to a company that says, “We can do full autonomy in this pre-mapped area and we’ve mapped almost every area,” that’s not Level 5. That’s Level 4. And I wouldn’t even stop there: I would ask, “Is that at all times of the day, is it in all weather, is it in all traffic?” And then what you’ll usually find is a little bit of hedging on that too. The trouble with this Level 4 thing, or the “full autonomy” phrase, is that it covers a very wide spectrum of possible competencies. It covers “my car can run fully autonomously in a dedicated lane that has no other traffic,” which isn’t very different from a train on a set of rails, to “I can drive in Rome in the middle of the worst traffic they ever have there, while it’s raining," which is quite hard.

Because the “full autonomy” phrase can mean such a wide range of things, you really have to ask the question, “What do you really mean, what are the actual circumstances?” And usually you’ll find that it’s geofenced for area, it may be restricted by how much traffic it can handle, for the weather, the time of day, things like that. So that’s the elaboration of why we’re not even close.
autonomy  driving  self-driving  cars  ai  robots  toyota  weather 
january 2017 by jm
Self-driving cars: overlooking data privacy is a car crash waiting to happen
Interesting point -- self-driving cars are likely to be awash in telemetry data, "phoned home"
self-driving  cars  vehicles  law  data  privacy  data-privacy  surveillance 
july 2016 by jm
Troy Hunt: Controlling vehicle features of Nissan LEAFs across the globe via vulnerable APIs
holy crap. Nissan expose a public API authenticated _solely_ using the car's VIN -- which is more or less public info; the API allows turning on/off AC, grabbing driving history, etc.
security  fail  nissan  leaf  cars  apis  vin  authentication 
february 2016 by jm
Floating car data
Floating car data (FCD), also known as floating cellular data, is a method to determine the traffic speed on the road network. It is based on the collection of localization data, speed, direction of travel and time information from mobile phones in vehicles that are being driven. These data are the essential source for traffic information and for most intelligent transportation systems (ITS). This means that every vehicle with an active mobile phone acts as a sensor for the road network. Based on these data, traffic congestion can be identified, travel times can be calculated, and traffic reports can be rapidly generated. In contrast to traffic cameras, number plate recognition systems, and induction loops embedded in the roadway, no additional hardware on the road network is necessary.
surveillance  cars  driving  mobile-phones  phones  travel  gsm  monitoring  anpr  alpr  traffic 
november 2015 by jm
Three quarters of cars stolen in France 'electronically hacked' - Telegraph
The astonishing figures come two months after computer scientists in the UK warned that thousands of cars – including high-end brands such as Porsches and Maseratis - are at risk of electronic hacking. Their research was suppressed for two years by a court injunction for fear it would help thieves steal vehicles to order. The kit required to carry out such “mouse jacking”, as the French have coined the practice, can be freely purchased on the internet for around £700 and the theft of a range of models can be pulled off “within minutes,” motor experts warn.
hacking  security  security-through-obscurity  mouse-jacking  cars  safety  theft  crime  france  smart-cars 
november 2015 by jm
ustwo Reimagines the In-Car Cluster
Designers behind the cult mobile game, Monument Valley, take on the legacy-bound in-car UI
ux  ui  cars  driving  safety  ustwo  monument-valley  speed 
september 2015 by jm
background doc on the Jeep hack
"Remote Exploitation of an Unaltered Passenger Vehicle", by Dr. Charlie Miller (cmiller@openrce.org) and Chris Valasek (cvalasek@gmail.com). QNX, unauthenticated D-Bus, etc.

'Since a vehicle can scan for other vulnerable vehicles and the exploit doesn’t require any user interaction, it would be possible to write a worm. This worm would scan for vulnerable vehicles, exploit them with their payload which would scan for other vulnerable vehicles, etc. This is really interesting and scary. Please don’t do this. Please.'
jeep  hacks  exploits  d-bus  qnx  cars  safety  risks 
august 2015 by jm
HACKERS REMOTELY KILL A JEEP ON THE HIGHWAY—WITH ME IN IT
Jaysus, this is terrifying.
Miller and Valasek’s full arsenal includes functions that at lower speeds fully kill the engine, abruptly engage the brakes, or disable them altogether. The most disturbing maneuver came when they cut the Jeep’s brakes, leaving me frantically pumping the pedal as the 2-ton SUV slid uncontrollably into a ditch.


Avoid any car which supports this staggeringly-badly-conceived Uconnect feature:

All of this is possible only because Chrysler, like practically all carmakers, is doing its best to turn the modern automobile into a smartphone. Uconnect, an Internet-connected computer feature in hundreds of thousands of Fiat Chrysler cars, SUVs, and trucks, controls the vehicle’s entertainment and navigation, enables phone calls, and even offers a Wi-Fi hot spot.


:facepalm:

Also, Chrysler's response sucks: "Chrysler’s patch must be manually implemented via a USB stick or by a dealership mechanic."
hacking  security  cars  driving  safety  brakes  jeeps  chrysler  fiat  uconnect  can-bus  can 
july 2015 by jm
Self-driving cars drive like your grandma
'Honestly, I don't think it will take long for other drivers to realize that self-driving cars are "easy targets" in traffic.' -- also, an insurance expert suggests that self-driving cars won't increase premiums
driving  google  cars  traffic  social  insurance 
july 2015 by jm
Volvo says horrible 'self-parking car accident' happened because driver didn't have 'pedestrian detection'
Grim meathook future, courtesy of Volvo:
“The Volvo XC60 comes with City Safety as a standard feature however this does not include the Pedestrian detection functionality [...] The pedestrian detection feature [...] costs approximately $3,000.


However, there's another lesson here, in crappy car UX and the risks thereof:
But even if it did have the feature, Larsson says the driver would have interfered with it by the way they were driving and “accelerating heavily towards the people in the video.” “The pedestrian detection would likely have been inactivated due to the driver inactivating it by intentionally and actively accelerating,” said Larsson. “Hence, the auto braking function is overrided by the driver and deactivated.” Meanwhile, the people in the video seem to ignore their instincts and trust that the car assumed to be endowed with artificial intelligence knows not to hurt them. It is a sign of our incredible faith in the power of technology, but also, it’s a reminder that companies making AI-assisted vehicles need to make safety features standard and communicate clearly when they aren’t.
self-driving-cars  cars  ai  pedestrian  computer-vision  volvo  fail  accidents  grim-meathook-future 
may 2015 by jm
Keeping Your Car Safe From Electronic Thieves - NYTimes.com
In a normal scenario, when you walk up to a car with a keyless entry and try the door handle, the car wirelessly calls out for your key so you don’t have to press any buttons to get inside. If the key calls back, the door unlocks. But the keyless system is capable of searching for a key only within a couple of feet. Mr. Danev said that when the teenage girl turned on her device, it amplified the distance that the car can search, which then allowed my car to talk to my key, which happened to be sitting about 50 feet away, on the kitchen counter. And just like that, open sesame.


What the hell -- who designed a system that would auto-unlock based on signal strength alone?!!
security  fail  cars  keys  signal  proximity  keyless-entry  prius  toyota  crime  amplification  power-amplifiers  3db  keyless 
april 2015 by jm
Hailo pulling in EUR1M per month in Dublin alone
based on these (pretty rough) estimates. Good going, I'm a massive fan
hailo  taxis  driving  cars  public-transport  dublin  b2c  b2b 
june 2014 by jm
Google: Our Robot Cars Are Better Drivers Than Puny Humans | MIT Technology Review
One of those analyses showed that when a human was behind the wheel, Google’s cars accelerated and braked significantly more sharply than they did when piloting themselves. Another showed that the cars’ software was much better at maintaining a safe distance from the vehicle ahead than the human drivers were. “We’re spending less time in near-collision states,” said Urmson. “Our car is driving more smoothly and more safely than our trained professional drivers.”
google  cars  driving  safety  roads  humans  robots  automation 
october 2013 by jm
The Ethics of Autonomous Cars
Sometimes good judgment can compel us to act illegally. Should a self-driving vehicle get to make that same decision?
ethics  stories  via:chris-horn  the-atlantic  driving  cars  law  robots  self-driving-vehicles 
october 2013 by jm
Stayhold
a completely new patent pending product designed in Ireland that is going to change the way people use their cars for carrying goods.  It is a solid plastic product that grips the carpet in your car and acts as a barrier to hold loose items securely against the side wall in your car trunk or boot.


Found out about this online -- a US-based acquaintance raving about them being worth the shipping from Ireland. nice work!
stayhold  transportation  cars  boot  gadgets  toget 
july 2013 by jm
Stats from an Irish guy's EV driving
EUR 529.07 over ~4000 miles in his Nissan Leaf; that works out as a yearly savings of EUR 1587.21. not to be sniffed at -- although what's the premium for a Leaf over a standard diesel?
ev  cars  driving  nissan  economy  ireland  fuel  prices 
march 2012 by jm
GoCar
pay as you go car-sharing and short-term car rental in Dublin
cars  travel  dublin  ireland  from delicious
november 2010 by jm

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