jm + career   11

Management levels
I’ve had the privilege of experiencing a few different management levels (responsibilities? jobs?) at Etsy since I’ve joined. At each stage, I felt like the job of being a manager totally changed. What I did day-to-day changed, what was hard about it changed, how I measured my own success changed, and though I feel like the experiences built on one another, it continues to be an enormous shift in brainpower each time the gig changes a bit. Given how intangible (and often hidden) management work can be, I’ve outlined some highlights of what my work has been like as a manager over the last four years. (Obvious, major caveat: this is just my experience, and there’s lots in here that is unique to this particular work environment, hierarchy, requirements, and challenges!)
business  engineering  management  career  lara-hogan  managing 
october 2016 by jm
I am Alex St. John’s Daughter, and He is Wrong About Women in Tech — Medium
Great, great post from Amilia St. John, responding to the offensive sexist crap spewed by her father, Alex St. John
sexism  career  tech  amilia-st-john  alex-st-john  jobs  work  feminism 
april 2016 by jm
RentTheRunway's Engineering Ladder
One of the best things about working at Amazon was having a clear, well-defined career progression, and it's something that's always been absent in startups. Career growth, levelling, and tech management is important, and also helps in hiring by providing clear levels. This is the RentTheRunway engineering ladder, Camille Fournier's team, which they open sourced back in March 2015
engineering  hiring  management  career  renttherunway  camille-fournier  amazon  startups  career-growth  levelling  ladder 
october 2015 by jm
Programmer IS A Career Path, Thank You
Well said -- Amazon had a good story around this btw
programming  coding  career  work  life 
february 2015 by jm
Dan McKinley :: Thoughts on the Technical Track
Ouch. I think Amazon did a better job of the Technical Track concept than this, at least
engineering  management  technical-track  principal-engineer  career  work 
december 2014 by jm
Why GitHub is not your CV
There is really astonishingly little value in looking at someone’s GitHub projects out of context. For a start, GitHub has no way of customising your profile page, and what is shown by default is the projects with the most stars, and the projects you’ve recently pushed to. That is, GitHub picks your most popular repos and puts those at the top. You have no say about what you consider important, or worthwhile, or interesting, or well-engineered, or valuable. You just get what other people think is useful. Aside from which, GitHub displays a lot of useless stats about how many followers you have, and some completely psychologically manipulative stats about how often you commit and how many days it is since you had a day off.

So really, your GitHub profile displays two things: how ‘influential’ you are, and how easily you can be coerced into constantly working. It’s honestly about as relevant to a decent hiring decision as your Klout score.
cv  github  open-source  hiring  career  meritocracy  work  via:apyhr 
november 2013 by jm
New faculty positions versus new PhDs
The ever-plummeting chances of a PhD finding a faculty job:
Since 1982, almost 800,000 PhDs were awarded in science and engineering fields, whereas only about 100,000 academic faculty positions were created in those fields within the same time frame. The number of S&E PhDs awarded annually has also increased over this time frame, from ~19,000 in 1982 to ~36,000 in 2011. The number of faculty positions created each year, however, has not changed, with roughly 3,000 new positions created annually.


(via Javier Omar Garcia)
via:javier  career  academia  phd  science  work  study  research 
october 2013 by jm
On Being A Senior Engineer
Encyclopedic post from John Allspaw (of Etsy) on the topic, with an "Obligatory [List Of] Pithy Characteristics"
senior  engineering  career  tech  coding  work 
october 2012 by jm
Don’t waste your time in crappy startup jobs
7 reasons why working for a startup sucks. Been there, done that -- I wish I'd read this years ago. It should be permalinked at the top of Hacker News.

"In 1995, a lot of talented young people went into large corporations because they saw no other option in the private sector– when, in fact, there were credible alternatives, startups being a great option. In 2012, a lot of young talent is going into startups for the same reason: a belief that it’s the only legitimate work opportunity for top talent, and that their careers are likely to stagnate if they work in more established businesses. They’re wrong, I think, and this mistaken belief allows them to be taken advantage of.

The typical equity offer for a software engineer is dismally short of what he’s giving up in terms of reduced salary, and the career path offered by startups is not always what it’s made out to be. For all this, I don’t intend to argue that people shouldn’t join startups. If the offer’s good, and the job looks interesting, it’s worth trying out. I just don’t think that the current, unconditional “startups are awesome!” mentality serves us well. It’s not good for any of us, because there’s no tyrant worse than a peer selling himself short, and right now there are a lot of great people selling themselves very short for a shot at the “startup experience” -- whatever that is."
startups  work  job  life  career  tech  vc  companies  pay  stock  share-options 
july 2012 by jm

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