jm + capitalism   4

The Gig Economy Celebrates Working Yourself to Death - The New Yorker
At the root of this is the American obsession with self-reliance, which makes it more acceptable to applaud an individual for working himself to death than to argue that an individual working himself to death is evidence of a flawed economic system. The contrast between the gig economy’s rhetoric (everyone is always connecting, having fun, and killing it!) and the conditions that allow it to exist (a lack of dependable employment that pays a living wage) makes this kink in our thinking especially clear.
capitalism  culture  gig-economy  lyft  fiverr  work  jobs  employment  self-reliance 
5 weeks ago by jm
Soylent, Neoliberalism and the Politics of Life Hacking - CounterPunch: Tells the Facts, Names the Names
Soylent’s not purchased by the Mark Zuckerbergs or the Larry Pages or the other tech aristocrats [...] Rather, it’s been taken up by white-collar workers and students destined for perpetual toil in the digital mills. Their embrace of life hacking represents the internalisation of management practices by the managed themselves.
life-hacks  soylent  food  politics  taylorism  efficiency  capitalism  work  life 
may 2015 by jm
Tracing Brazil’s Guy Fawkes Masks
really fascinating, from Ethan Zuckerman:
The photo of workers making Guy Fawkes masks is something of a Rorschach test. If you’re primed to see the exploitative nature of global capitalism when you see people making a plastic mask, it’s there in the image. if you’re looking for the global spread of a protest movement, it’s there too, with a Brazilian factory making a local knock-off of a global icon to cash in on a national protest.
Because the internet is a copying machine, it’s very bad at context. It’s easier to encounter the image of masks being manufactured devoid of accompanying details than it is to find the story behind the images. And given our tendency to ignore information in languages we don’t read, it’s easy to see how the masks come detached from their accompanying story. For me, the image is more powerful with context behind it. It’s possible to reflect on the irony of a Hollywood prop becoming an activist trope, the tensions between mass-production and anonymity and the individuality of one’s identity and grievance, the tensions between local and global, Warner Bros and Condal, intellectual property and piracy, all in the same image.
anonymous  globalization  manufacturing  piracy  knock-offs  brazil  ethan-zuckerman  global  local  hollywood  capitalism 
november 2013 by jm

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: