jm + cap + databases   8

Don't Settle For Eventual Consistency
Quite an argument. Not sure I agree, but worth a bookmark anyway...
With an AP system, you are giving up consistency, and not really gaining anything in terms of effective availability, the type of availability you really care about.  Some might think you can regain strong consistency in an AP system by using strict quorums (where the number of nodes written + number of nodes read > number of replicas).  Cassandra calls this “tunable consistency”.  However, Kleppmann has shown that even with strict quorums, inconsistencies can result.10  So when choosing (algorithmic) availability over consistency, you are giving up consistency for not much in return, as well as gaining complexity in your clients when they have to deal with inconsistencies.
cap-theorem  databases  storage  cap  consistency  cp  ap  eventual-consistency 
june 2017 by jm
Jepsen: RethinkDB 2.1.5
A good review of RethinkDB! Hopefully not just because this test is contract work on behalf of the RethinkDB team ;)
I’ve run hundreds of test against RethinkDB at majority/majority, at various timescales, request rates, concurrencies, and with different types of failures. Consistent with the documentation, I have never found a linearization failure with these settings. If you use hard durability, majority writes, and majority reads, single-document ops in RethinkDB appear safe.
rethinkdb  databases  stores  storage  ops  availability  cap  jepsen  tests  replication 
january 2016 by jm
Please stop calling databases CP or AP
In his excellent blog post [...] Jeff Hodges recommends that you use the CAP theorem to critique systems. A lot of people have taken that advice to heart, describing their systems as “CP” (consistent but not available under network partitions), “AP” (available but not consistent under network partitions), or sometimes “CA” (meaning “I still haven’t read Coda’s post from almost 5 years ago”).

I agree with all of Jeff’s other points, but with regard to the CAP theorem, I must disagree. The CAP theorem is too simplistic and too widely misunderstood to be of much use for characterizing systems. Therefore I ask that we retire all references to the CAP theorem, stop talking about the CAP theorem, and put the poor thing to rest. Instead, we should use more precise terminology to reason about our trade-offs.
cap  databases  storage  distcomp  ca  ap  cp  zookeeper  consistency  reliability  networking 
may 2015 by jm
Call me maybe: Aerospike
'Aerospike offers phenomenal latencies and throughput -- but in terms of data safety, its strongest guarantees are similar to Cassandra or Riak in Last-Write-Wins mode. It may be a safe store for immutable data, but updates to a record can be silently discarded in the event of network disruption. Because Aerospike’s timeouts are so aggressive–on the order of milliseconds -- even small network hiccups are sufficient to trigger data loss. If you are an Aerospike user, you should not expect “immediate”, “read-committed”, or “ACID consistency”; their marketing material quietly assumes you have a magical network, and I assure you this is not the case. It’s certainly not true in cloud environments, and even well-managed physical datacenters can experience horrible network failures.'
aerospike  outages  cap  testing  jepsen  aphyr  databases  storage  reliability 
may 2015 by jm
Mnesia and CAP
A common “trick” is to claim:

'We assume network partitions can’t happen. Therefore, our system is CA according to the CAP theorem.'

This is a nice little twist. By asserting network partitions cannot happen, you just made your system into one which is not distributed. Hence the CAP theorem doesn’t even apply to your case and anything can happen. Your system may be linearizable. Your system might have good availability. But the CAP theorem doesn’t apply. [...]
In fact, any well-behaved system will be “CA” as long as there are no partitions. This makes the statement of a system being “CA” very weak, because it doesn’t put honesty first. I tries to avoid the hard question, which is how the system operates under failure. By assuming no network partitions, you assume perfect information knowledge in a distributed system. This isn’t the physical reality.
cap  erlang  mnesia  databases  storage  distcomp  reliability  ca  postgres  partitions 
october 2014 by jm
Call me maybe: Carly Rae Jepsen and the perils of network partitions
Kyle "aphyr" Kingsbury expands on his slides demonstrating the real-world failure scenarios that arise during some kinds of partitions (specifically, the TCP-hang, no clear routing failure, network partition scenario). Great set of blog posts clarifying CAP
distributed  network  databases  cap  nosql  redis  mongodb  postgresql  riak  crdt  aphyr 
may 2013 by jm
Alex Feinberg's response to Damien Katz' anti-Dynamoish/pro-Couchbase blog post
Insightful response, worth bookmarking. (the original post is at http://damienkatz.net/2013/05/dynamo_sure_works_hard.html ).
while you are saving on read traffic (online reads only go to the master), you are now decreasing availability (contrary to your stated goal), and increasing system complexity.
You also do hurt performance by requiring all writes and reads to be serialized through a single node: unless you plan to have a leader election whenever the node fails to meet a read SLA (which is going to result a disaster -- I am speaking from personal experience), you will have to accept that you're bottlenecked by a single node. With a Dynamo-style quorum (for either reads or writes), a single straggler will not reduce whole-cluster latency.
The core point of Dynamo is low latency, availability and handling of all kinds of partitions: whether clean partitions (long term single node failures), transient failures (garbage collection pauses, slow disks, network blips, etc...), or even more complex dependent failures.
The reality, of course, is that availability is neither the sole, nor the principal concern of every system. It's perfect fine to trade off availability for other goals -- you just need to be aware of that trade off.
cap  distributed-databases  databases  quorum  availability  scalability  damien-katz  alex-feinberg  partitions  network  dynamo  riak  voldemort  couchbase 
may 2013 by jm

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