jm + cap + ca   2

Please stop calling databases CP or AP
In his excellent blog post [...] Jeff Hodges recommends that you use the CAP theorem to critique systems. A lot of people have taken that advice to heart, describing their systems as “CP” (consistent but not available under network partitions), “AP” (available but not consistent under network partitions), or sometimes “CA” (meaning “I still haven’t read Coda’s post from almost 5 years ago”).

I agree with all of Jeff’s other points, but with regard to the CAP theorem, I must disagree. The CAP theorem is too simplistic and too widely misunderstood to be of much use for characterizing systems. Therefore I ask that we retire all references to the CAP theorem, stop talking about the CAP theorem, and put the poor thing to rest. Instead, we should use more precise terminology to reason about our trade-offs.
cap  databases  storage  distcomp  ca  ap  cp  zookeeper  consistency  reliability  networking 
may 2015 by jm
Mnesia and CAP
A common “trick” is to claim:

'We assume network partitions can’t happen. Therefore, our system is CA according to the CAP theorem.'

This is a nice little twist. By asserting network partitions cannot happen, you just made your system into one which is not distributed. Hence the CAP theorem doesn’t even apply to your case and anything can happen. Your system may be linearizable. Your system might have good availability. But the CAP theorem doesn’t apply. [...]
In fact, any well-behaved system will be “CA” as long as there are no partitions. This makes the statement of a system being “CA” very weak, because it doesn’t put honesty first. I tries to avoid the hard question, which is how the system operates under failure. By assuming no network partitions, you assume perfect information knowledge in a distributed system. This isn’t the physical reality.
cap  erlang  mnesia  databases  storage  distcomp  reliability  ca  postgres  partitions 
october 2014 by jm

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