jm + cap-theorem   11

Don't Settle For Eventual Consistency
Quite an argument. Not sure I agree, but worth a bookmark anyway...
With an AP system, you are giving up consistency, and not really gaining anything in terms of effective availability, the type of availability you really care about.  Some might think you can regain strong consistency in an AP system by using strict quorums (where the number of nodes written + number of nodes read > number of replicas).  Cassandra calls this “tunable consistency”.  However, Kleppmann has shown that even with strict quorums, inconsistencies can result.10  So when choosing (algorithmic) availability over consistency, you are giving up consistency for not much in return, as well as gaining complexity in your clients when they have to deal with inconsistencies.
cap-theorem  databases  storage  cap  consistency  cp  ap  eventual-consistency 
11 weeks ago by jm
Service discovery at Stripe
Writeup of their Consul-based service discovery system, a bit similar to smartstack. Good description of the production problems that they saw with Consul too, and also they figured out that strong consistency isn't actually what you want in a service discovery system ;)

HN comments are good too: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=12840803
consul  api  microservices  service-discovery  dns  load-balancing  l7  tcp  distcomp  smartstack  stripe  cap-theorem  scalability 
november 2016 by jm
Great quote from Voldemort author Jay Kreps
"Reading papers: essential. Slavishly implementing ideas you read: not necessarily a good idea. Trust me, I wrote an Amazon Dynamo clone."

Later in the discussion, on complex conflict resolution logic (as used in Dynamo, Voldemort, and Riak):

"I reviewed 200 Voldemort stores, 190 used default lww conflict resolution. 10 had custom logic, all 10 of which had bugs." -- https://twitter.com/jaykreps/statuses/528292617784537088

(although IMO I'd prefer complex resolution to non-availability, when AP is required)
voldemort  jay-kreps  dynamo  cap-theorem  ap  riak  papers  lww  conflict-resolution  distcomp 
november 2014 by jm
RICON 2014: CRDTs
Carlos Baquero presents several operation, state-based CRDTs for use in AP systems like Voldemort and Riak
ap  cap-theorem  crdts  ricon  carlos-baquero  data-structures  distcomp 
october 2014 by jm
"Perspectives On The CAP Theorem" [pdf]
"We cannot achieve [CAP theorem] consistency and availability in a partition-prone network."
papers  cap  distcomp  cap-theorem  consistency  availability  partitions  network  reliability 
september 2014 by jm
Call me maybe: RabbitMQ
We used Knossos and Jepsen to prove the obvious: RabbitMQ is not a lock service. That investigation led to a discovery hinted at by the documentation: in the presence of partitions, RabbitMQ clustering will not only deliver duplicate messages, but will also drop huge volumes of acknowledged messages on the floor. This is not a new result, but it may be surprising if you haven’t read the docs closely–especially if you interpreted the phrase “chooses Consistency and Partition Tolerance” to mean, well, either of those things.
rabbitmq  network  partitions  failure  cap-theorem  consistency  ops  reliability  distcomp  jepsen 
june 2014 by jm
Kelly "kellabyte" Sommers on Redis' "relaxed CP" approach to the CAP theorem

Similar to ACID properties, if you partially provide properties it means the user has to _still_ consider in their application that the property doesn't exist, because sometimes it doesn't. In you're fsync example, if fsync is relaxed and there are no replicas, you cannot consider the database durable, just like you can't consider Redis a CP system. It can't be counted on for guarantees to be delivered. This is why I say these systems are hard for users to reason about. Systems that partially offer guarantees require in-depth knowledge of the nuances to properly use the tool. Systems that explicitly make the trade-offs in the designs are easier to reason about because it is more obvious and _predictable_.
kellabyte  redis  cp  ap  cap-theorem  consistency  outages  reliability  ops  database  storage  distcomp 
december 2013 by jm
"Scalable Eventually Consistent Counters over Unreliable Networks" [paper, pdf]

Counters are an important abstraction in distributed computing, and
play a central role in large scale geo-replicated systems, counting events such as web page impressions or social network "likes". Classic distributed counters, strongly consistent, cannot be made both available and partition-tolerant, due to the CAP Theorem, being unsuitable to large scale scenarios.

This paper defi nes Eventually Consistent Distributed Counters (ECDC) and presents an implementation of the concept, Hando ff Counters, that is scalable and works over unreliable networks. By giving up the sequencer aspect of classic distributed counters, ECDC implementations can be made AP in the CAP design space, while retaining the essence of counting. Handoff Counters are the first CRDT (Conflict-free Replicated Data Type) based mechanism that overcomes the identity explosion problem in naive CRDTs, such as G-Counters (where state size is linear in the number of independent actors that ever incremented the counter), by managing identities towards avoiding global propagation, and garbage collecting temporary entries. The approach used in Hando ff Counters is not restricted to counters, being more generally applicable to other data types with associative and commutative operations.
pdf  papers  eventual-consistency  counters  distributed-systems  distcomp  cap-theorem  ecdc  handoff-counters  crdts  data-structures  g-counters 
august 2013 by jm
_Bolt-On Causal Consistency_ [slides]
SIGMOD 2013 presentation from Peter Bailis, Ali Ghodsi, Joseph M. Hellerstein, Ion Stoica -- adding consistency to an eventually-consistent store by tracking dependencies
eventual-consistency  state  cap-theorem  storage  peter-bailis 
june 2013 by jm
The CAP FAQ by henryr
No subject appears to be more controversial to distributed systems engineers than the oft-quoted, oft-misunderstood CAP theorem. The purpose of this FAQ is to explain what is known about CAP, so as to help those new to the theorem get up to speed quickly, and to settle some common misconceptions or points of disagreement.
database  distributed  nosql  cap  consistency  cap-theorem  faqs 
june 2013 by jm

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