jm + cables   7

Total Nightmare: USB-C and Thunderbolt 3
the coming incompatibility nightmare of USB-C cabling
usb  usb-c  thunderbolt  apple  cables  hardware  confusion 
november 2016 by jm
TeleGeography Submarine Cable Map 2015
Gorgeously-illustrated retro map of modern-day submarine cables. Prints available for $150 (via Conor Delaney)
via:conor-delaney  data  internet  maps  cables  world  telegeography  mapping  retro 
march 2016 by jm
Richard Tynan on Twitter: "GCHQ Tapping Eircom owned cable"
Cable listed as owned by Eircom and Cable and Wireless (now Vodafone?)
vodafone  cables  tapping  surveillance  eircom  internet  uk 
november 2014 by jm
GCHQ tapping at least 14 EU fiber-optic cables
Süddeutsche Zeitung (SZ) had already revealed in late June that the British had access to the cable TAT-14, which connects Germany with the USA, UK, Denmark, France and the Netherlands. In addition to TAT-14, the other cables that GCHQ has access to include Atlantic Crossing 1, Circe North, Circe South, Flag Atlantic-1, Flag Europa-Asia, SeaMeWe-3 and SeaMeWe-4, Solas, UK France 3, UK Netherlands-14, Ulysses, Yellow and the Pan European Crossing.
sz  germany  cables  fiber-optic  tapping  snooping  tat-14  eu  politics  gchq 
august 2013 by jm
IrelandOffline broadband availability map
Marking the locations of broadband options in your area, along with VDSL cabinets, local exchanges, and wireless ISP coverage, and the landing sites of submarine cables (presumably from submarinecablemap.com data)
irelandoffline  cables  network  internet  ireland  coverage  wisps  vdsl  broadband 
august 2013 by jm
Knots on Mars! (and a few thoughts on NASA's knots)
amazing post from the International Guild of Knot Tyers Forum:

While a few of the folks here are no doubt aware, it might surprise most people to learn that knots tied in cords and thin ribbons have probably traveled on every interplanetary mission ever flown. If human civilization ends tomorrow, interplanetary landers, orbiters, and deep space probes will preserve evidence of both the oldest and newest of human technologies for millions of years.

Knots are still used in this high-tech arena because cable lacing has long been the preferred cable management technique in aerospace applications. That it remains so to this day is a testament to the effectiveness of properly chosen knots tied by skilled craftspeople. It also no doubt has a bit to do with the conservative nature of aerospace design and engineering practices. Proven technologies are rarely cast aside unless they no longer fulfill requirements or there is something substantially better available.

While the knots used for cable lacing in general can be quite varied -- in some cases even a bit idiosyncratic -- NASA has in-house standards for the knots and methods used on their spacecraft. These are specified in NASA Technical Standard NASA-STD-8739.4 -- Crimping, Interconnecting Cables, Harnesses, and Wiring. As far as I've been able to identify in the rover images below, all of the lacings shown are one of two of the several patterns specified in the standard.

The above illustration shows the so-called "Spot Tie". It is a clove hitch topped by two half-knots in the form of a reef (square) knot. In addition to its pure binding role, it is also used to affix cable bundles to tie-down point.


Some amazing scholarship on knot technology in this post -- lots to learn! (via Tony Finch, iirc)
via:fanf  mars  nasa  science  knots  tying  rope  cables  cabling  geek  aerospace  standards 
september 2012 by jm
Redditor explains why Apple power cables break frequently
"As with any company, Apple consists of many divisions (Sales, Marketing, Customer Service, etc.) THE most powerful division at Apple is Industrial Design. For those of you unfamiliar with the term industrial design, this is the division that makes the decisions about the overall look and feel of Apple's products. And when I say "the most powerful", I mean that their decisions trump the decisions of any other division at Apple, including Engineering and Customer Service. Now it just so happens that the Industrial Design department HATES how a strain relief looks on a power adapter. They would much prefer to have a nice clean transition between the cable and the plug. Aesthetically, this does look nicer, but from an engineering point of view, it's pretty much committing reliability suicide. Because there is no strain relief, the cables fail at a very high rate because they get bent at very harsh angles. I'm sure that the Engineering division gave every reason in the world why a strain relief should be on an adapter cable, and Customer Service said how bad the customer experience would be if tons of adapters failed, but if industrial design doesn't like a strain relief, guess what, it gets removed."
apple  cables  design  industrial-design  power-cables  funny 
june 2011 by jm

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