jm + c10m   1

Martin Thompson, Luke "Snabb Switch" Gorrie etc. review the C10M presentation from Schmoocon
on the mechanical-sympathy mailing list. Some really interesting discussion on handling insane quantities of TCP connections using low volumes of hardware:
This talk has some good points and I think the subject is really interesting.  I would take the suggested approach with serious caution.  For starters the Linux kernel is nowhere near as bad as it made out.  Last year I worked with a client and we scaled a single server to 1 million concurrent connections with async programming in Java and some sensible kernel tuning.  I've heard they have since taken this to over 5 million concurrent connections.

BTW Open Onload is an open source implementation.  Writing a network stack is a serious undertaking.  In a previous life I wrote a network probe and had to reassemble TCP streams and kept getting tripped up by edge cases.  It is a great exercise in data structures and lock-free programming.  If you need very high-end performance I'd talk to the Solarflare or Mellanox guys before writing my own.

There are some errors and omissions in this talk.  For example, his range of ephemeral ports is not quite right, and atomic operations are only 15 cycles on Sandy Bridge when hitting local cache.  A big issue for me is when he defined C10M he did not mention the TIME_WAIT issue with closing connections.  Creating and destroying 1 million connections per second is a major issue.  A protocol like HTTP is very broken in that the server closes the socket and therefore has to retain the TCB until the specified timeout occurs to ensure no older packet is delivered to a new socket connection.
mechanical-sympathy  hardware  scaling  c10m  tcp  http  scalability  snabb-switch  martin-thompson 
may 2013 by jm

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: