jm + c++   25

Google Online Security Blog: Introducing the Tink cryptographic software library
Tink aims to provide cryptographic APIs that are secure, easy to use correctly, and hard(er) to misuse. Tink is built on top of existing libraries such as BoringSSL and Java Cryptography Architecture, but includes countermeasures to many weaknesses in these libraries, which were discovered by Project Wycheproof, another project from our team.
With Tink, many common cryptographic operations such as data encryption, digital signatures, etc. can be done with only a few lines of code.
tink  google  java  c++  boringssl  ssl  jca  crypto 
august 2018 by jm
The BARR-C:2018 Embedded C Coding Standard
'Barr Group's Embedded C Coding Standard was developed to minimize bugs in firmware by focusing on practical rules that keep bugs out--while also improving the maintainability and portability of embedded software. The coding standard details a set of guiding principles as well as specific naming conventions and other rules for the use of data types, functions, preprocessor macros, variables and much more. Individual rules that have been demonstrated to reduce or eliminate certain types of bugs are highlighted. In this latest version, BARR-C:2018, the stylistic coding rules have been fully harmonized with MISRA C: 2012, while helping embedded system designers reduce defects in firmware written in C and C++.'
embedded  c  coding  standards  style-guides  misra  c++ 
august 2018 by jm
rr: lightweight recording & deterministic debugging
aspires to be your primary C/C++ debugging tool for Linux, replacing — well, enhancing — gdb. You record a failure once, then debug the recording, deterministically, as many times as you want. The same execution is replayed every time. rr also provides efficient reverse execution under gdb. Set breakpoints and data watchpoints and quickly reverse-execute to where they were hit.


(via Kevin Lyda and b0rk)
debug  gdb  mozilla  debugging  coding  cli  c++  c 
march 2018 by jm
Abseil
a new common C++ library from Google, Apache-licensed.
c++  coding  abseil  google  commons  libraries  open-source  asl2  c++17 
september 2017 by jm
Undefined Behavior in 2017
This is an extremely detailed post on the state of dynamic checkers in C/C++ (via the inimitable Marc Brooker):
Recently we’ve heard a few people imply that problems stemming from undefined behaviors (UB) in C and C++ are largely solved due to ubiquitous availability of dynamic checking tools such as ASan, UBSan, MSan, and TSan. We are here to state the obvious — that, despite the many excellent advances in tooling over the last few years, UB-related problems are far from solved — and to look at the current situation in detail.
via:marc-brooker  c  c++  coding  testing  debugging  dynamic-analysis  valgrind  asan  ubsan  tsan 
july 2017 by jm
Seastar
C++ high-performance app framework; 'currently focused on high-throughput, low-latency I/O intensive applications.'

Scylla (Cassandra-compatible NoSQL store) is written in this.
c++  opensource  performance  framework  scylla  seastar  latency  linux  shared-nothing  multicore 
september 2015 by jm
Explanation of the Jump Consistent Hash algorithm
I blogged about the amazing stateless Jump Consistent Hash algorithm last year, but this is a good walkthrough of how it works.

Apparently one author, Eric Veach, is legendary -- https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=9209891 : "Eric Veach is huge in the computer graphics world for laying a ton of the foundations of modern physically based rendering in his PhD thesis [1]. He then went on to work for Pixar and did a ton of work on Renderman (for which he recently got an Academy Award), and then in the early 2000ish left Pixar to go work for Google, where he was the lead on developing AdWords [2]. In short, he's had quite a career, and seeing a new paper from him is always interesting."
eric-veach  consistent-hashing  algorithms  google  adwords  renderman  pixar  history  coding  c  c++ 
march 2015 by jm
8 gdb tricks you should know (Ksplice Blog)
These are very good -- bookmarking for the next time I'm using gdb, probably about 3 years from now
c  debugging  gdb  c++  tips  coding 
january 2015 by jm
coz
A causal profiler for C++.
Causal profiling is a novel technique to measure optimization potential. This measurement matches developers' assumptions about profilers: that optimizing highly-ranked code will have the greatest impact on performance. Causal profiling measures optimization potential for serial, parallel, and asynchronous programs without instrumentation of special handling for library calls and concurrency primitives. Instead, a causal profiler uses performance experiments to predict the effect of optimizations. This allows the profiler to establish causality: "optimizing function X will have effect Y," exactly the measurement developers had assumed they were getting all along.


I can see this being a good technique to stochastically discover race conditions and concurrency bugs, too.
optimization  c++  performance  coding  profiling  speed  causal-profilers 
december 2014 by jm
Introducing Proxygen, Facebook's C++ HTTP framework
Facebook's take on libevent, I guess:
We are excited to announce the release of Proxygen, a collection of C++ HTTP libraries, including an easy-to-use HTTP server. In addition to HTTP/1.1, Proxygen (rhymes with "oxygen") supports SPDY/3 and SPDY/3.1. We are also iterating and developing support for HTTP/2.

Proxygen is not designed to replace Apache or nginx — those projects focus on building extremely flexible HTTP servers written in C that offer good performance but almost overwhelming amounts of configurability. Instead, we focused on building a high performance C++ HTTP framework with sensible defaults that includes both server and client code and that's easy to integrate into existing applications. We want to help more people build and deploy high performance C++ HTTP services, and we believe that Proxygen is a great framework to do so.
c++  facebook  http  servers  libevent  https  spdy  proxygen  libraries 
november 2014 by jm
CLion – Brand New IDE for C and C++ Developers
JetBrains (makers of the excellent Intelli/J) have come out with a C/C++ refactoring IDE which looks utterly fantastic. If I wind up hacking on C/C++ again in future, I'll be using this one
c  c++  refactoring  ide  intelli-j  clion  jetbrains  editors  coding 
september 2014 by jm
Facebook's drop-in replacement for std::vector
Fixes some low-hanging fruit, performance-wise.

'Simply replacing std::vector with folly::fbvector (after having included the folly/FBVector.h header file) will improve the performance of your C++ code using vectors with common coding patterns. The improvements are always non-negative, almost always measurable, frequently significant, sometimes dramatic, and occasionally spectacular.'

(via Tony Finch)
c++  facebook  performance  algorithms  vectors  via:fanf  optimization 
september 2014 by jm
cloudflare/lua-aho-corasick
A nice Lua/C++ implementation of Aho-Corasick for fast string matching against multiple patterns (via JGC). This uses an interesting technique to get better performance by compacting the data structure into a single buffer, to avoid following pointers all over RAM and busting the cache.
optimization  speed  performance  aho-corasick  tries  string-matching  strings  algorithms  lua  c++  via:jgc 
august 2014 by jm
"Pitfalls of Object Oriented Programming", SCEE R&D
Good presentation discussing "data-oriented programming" -- the concept of optimizing memory access speed by laying out large data in a columnar format in RAM, rather than naively in the default layout that OOP design suggests
columnar  ram  memory  optimization  coding  c++  oop  data-oriented-programming  data  cache  performance 
july 2014 by jm
stout
a C++ library adding some modern language features like Option, Try, Stopwatch, and other Guava-ish things (via @cscotta)
c++  library  stout  option  try  guava  coding 
july 2014 by jm
FlatBuffers: Main Page
A new serialization format from Google's Android gaming team, supporting C++ and Java, open source under the ASL v2. Reasons to use it:
Access to serialized data without parsing/unpacking - What sets FlatBuffers apart is that it represents hierarchical data in a flat binary buffer in such a way that it can still be accessed directly without parsing/unpacking, while also still supporting data structure evolution (forwards/backwards compatibility).
Memory efficiency and speed - The only memory needed to access your data is that of the buffer. It requires 0 additional allocations. FlatBuffers is also very suitable for use with mmap (or streaming), requiring only part of the buffer to be in memory. Access is close to the speed of raw struct access with only one extra indirection (a kind of vtable) to allow for format evolution and optional fields. It is aimed at projects where spending time and space (many memory allocations) to be able to access or construct serialized data is undesirable, such as in games or any other performance sensitive applications. See the benchmarks for details.
Flexible - Optional fields means not only do you get great forwards and backwards compatibility (increasingly important for long-lived games: don't have to update all data with each new version!). It also means you have a lot of choice in what data you write and what data you don't, and how you design data structures.
Tiny code footprint - Small amounts of generated code, and just a single small header as the minimum dependency, which is very easy to integrate. Again, see the benchmark section for details.
Strongly typed - Errors happen at compile time rather than manually having to write repetitive and error prone run-time checks. Useful code can be generated for you.
Convenient to use - Generated C++ code allows for terse access & construction code. Then there's optional functionality for parsing schemas and JSON-like text representations at runtime efficiently if needed (faster and more memory efficient than other JSON parsers).


Looks nice, but it misses the language coverage of protobuf. Definitely more practical than capnproto.
c++  google  java  serialization  json  formats  protobuf  capnproto  storage  flatbuffers 
june 2014 by jm
rr
A cool-looking new debugging tool for C/C++ from Mozilla.
Many, many people have noticed that if we had a way to reliably record program execution and replay it later, with the ability to debug the replay, we could largely tame the nondeterminism problem. This would also allow us to deliberately introduce nondeterminism so tests can explore more of the possible execution space, without impacting debuggability. Many record and replay systems have been built in pursuit of this vision. (I built one myself.) For various reasons these systems have not seen wide adoption. So, a few years ago we at Mozilla started a project to create a new record-and-replay tool that would overcome the obstacles blocking adoption. We call this tool rr.


Low runtime overhead; easy deployability; targeted at 32-bit (?!) Linux; OSS. (via Bryan O'Sullivan)
via:bos  mozilla  debugging  coding  firefox  rr  record  replay  gdb  c++  linux 
march 2014 by jm
Simple Binary Encoding
'SBE is an OSI layer 6 representation for encoding and decoding application messages in binary format for low-latency applications.'

Licensed under ASL2, C++ and Java supported.
sbe  encoding  codecs  persistence  binary  low-latency  open-source  java  c++  serialization 
december 2013 by jm
Cap'n Proto
Cap’n Proto is an insanely fast data interchange format and capability-based RPC system. Think JSON, except binary. Or think Protocol Buffers, except faster. In fact, in benchmarks, Cap’n Proto is INFINITY TIMES faster than Protocol Buffers.


Basically, marshalling like writing an aligned C struct to the wire, QNX messaging protocol-style. Wasteful on space, but responds to this by suggesting compression (which is a fair point tbh). C++-only for now. I'm not seeing the same kind of support for optional data that protobufs has though. Overall I'm worried there's some useful features being omitted here...
serialization  formats  protobufs  capn-proto  protocols  coding  c++  rpc  qnx  messaging  compression  compatibility  interoperability  i14y 
april 2013 by jm
C++ B-Tree
a new C++ template library from Google which implements an in-memory B-Tree container type, suitable for use as a drop-in replacement for std::map, set, multimap and multiset. Lower memory use, and reportedly faster due to better cache-friendliness
c++  google  data-structures  containers  b-trees  stl  map  set  open-source 
february 2013 by jm
#AltDevBlogADay » Functional Programming in C++
John Carmack makes a case for writing C++ in an FP style, with wide use of const and pure functions. something similar can be achieved in pure Java using Guava's Immutable types, to a certain extent. I love his other posts on this site -- he argues persuasively for static code analysis and keeping multiple alternative subsystem implementations, too
c++  programming  functional-programming  fp  coding  john-carmack  const  immutability 
october 2012 by jm
experimental CPU-cache-aware hash table implementations in Cloudera's Impala
via Todd Lipcon -- https://twitter.com/tlipcon/status/261113382642532352

'another cool piece of cloudera impala source: cpu-cache-aware hash table implementations by @jackowayed'. 'L1-sized hash table that hopes to use cache well. Each bucket is a chunk list of tuples. Each chunk is a cache line.'
hashing  hash-tables  data-structures  performance  c++  l1  cache  cpu 
october 2012 by jm
1024cores
Some good algorithms and notes by Dmitry Vyukov on 'lockfree, waitfree, obstruction-free synchronization algorithms and data structures, scalability-oriented architecture, multicore/multiprocessor design patterns, high-performance computing, threading technologies and libraries (OpenMP, TBB, PPL), message-passing systems and related topics.' The catalog of lock-free queue implementations is particularly extensive (via Sergio Bossa)
algorithms  concurrency  articles  dmitry-vyukov  go  c++  coding  via:sergio-bossa 
august 2012 by jm
"Source Code Optimisation", Felix von Leitner, Linux Kongress 2009 [PDF]
Good presentation on C compiler optimization, via Cal Henderson. 'People often write less readable code because they think it will produce faster code. Unfortunately, in most cases, the code will not be faster.' I particularly like 'Fancy-Schmancy Algorithms': 'If you have 10-100 elements, use a list, not a red-black tree; Fancy data structures help on paper, but rarely in reality. (More space overhead in the data structure, less L2 cache left for actual data.)'
via:iamcal  compilers  c  c++  optimization  coding  assembly  speed  from delicious
november 2009 by jm

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