jm + brazil   5

Towards true continuous integration – Netflix TechBlog – Medium
Netflix discuss how they handle the eternal dependency-management problem which arises with lots of microservices:
Using the monorepo as our requirements specification, we began exploring alternative approaches to achieving the same benefits. What are the core problems that a monorepo approach strives to solve? Can we develop a solution that works within the confines of a traditional binary integration world, where code is shared? Our approach, while still experimental, can be distilled into three key features:

Publisher feedback — provide the owner of shared code fast feedback as to which of their consumers they just broke, both direct and transitive. Also, allow teams to block releases based on downstream breakages. Currently, our engineering culture puts sole responsibility on consumers to resolve these issues. By giving library owners feedback on the impact they have to the rest of Netflix, we expect them to take on additional responsibility.

Managed source — provide consumers with a means to safely increment library versions automatically as new versions are released. Since we are already testing each new library release against all downstreams, why not bump consumer versions and accelerate version adoption, safely.

Distributed refactoring — provide owners of shared code a means to quickly find and globally refactor consumers of their API. We have started by issuing pull requests en masse to all Git repositories containing a consumer of a particular Java API. We’ve run some early experiments and expect to invest more in this area going forward.


What I find interesting is that Amazon dealt effectively with the first two many years ago, in the form of their "Brazil" build system, and Google do the latter (with Refaster?). It would be amazing to see such a system released into an open source form, but maybe it's just too heavyweight for anyone other than a giant software company on the scale of a Google, Netflix or Amazon.
brazil  amazon  build  microservices  dependencies  coding  monorepo  netflix  google  refaster 
8 weeks ago by jm
The Tamborzão Goes to Thailand
This is great. the story of how cheesy funk carioca tune “A Minha Amiga Fran” managed to become "Kawo Kawo" and become a massive hit in Thailand
thai  brazil  carioca  music  dance-music  kawo-kawo 
june 2015 by jm
Irish quango allegedly buys fake twitter followers
The Consumers Association of Ireland had a sudden jump from 300 to 3000 Twitter followers, mostly from Latin and South America -- with more followers in Brazil than Ireland. They are now blaming "hacking": http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/consumers-body-denies-buying-3000-twitter-fans-29931196.html
consumers  quangos  ireland  politics  twitter  funny  fake-followers  latin-america  south-america  brazil  social-media  tech 
january 2014 by jm
Tracing Brazil’s Guy Fawkes Masks
really fascinating, from Ethan Zuckerman:
The photo of workers making Guy Fawkes masks is something of a Rorschach test. If you’re primed to see the exploitative nature of global capitalism when you see people making a plastic mask, it’s there in the image. if you’re looking for the global spread of a protest movement, it’s there too, with a Brazilian factory making a local knock-off of a global icon to cash in on a national protest.
Because the internet is a copying machine, it’s very bad at context. It’s easier to encounter the image of masks being manufactured devoid of accompanying details than it is to find the story behind the images. And given our tendency to ignore information in languages we don’t read, it’s easy to see how the masks come detached from their accompanying story. For me, the image is more powerful with context behind it. It’s possible to reflect on the irony of a Hollywood prop becoming an activist trope, the tensions between mass-production and anonymity and the individuality of one’s identity and grievance, the tensions between local and global, Warner Bros and Condal, intellectual property and piracy, all in the same image.
anonymous  globalization  manufacturing  piracy  knock-offs  brazil  ethan-zuckerman  global  local  hollywood  capitalism 
november 2013 by jm

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