jm + brain   8

Cordyceps even creepier than at first thought
Hughes’s team found that fungal cells infiltrate the ant’s entire body, including its head, but they leave its brain untouched. There are other parasites that manipulate their hosts without destroying their brains, says Kelly Weinersmith from Rice University. For example, one flatworm forms a carpet-like layer over the brain of the California killifish, leaving the brain intact while forcing the fish to behave erratically and draw the attention of birds—the flatworm’s next host. “But manipulation of ants by Ophiocordyceps is so exquisitely precise that it is perhaps surprising that the fungus doesn't invade the brain of its host,” Weinersmith says. [....]

So what we have here is a hostile takeover of a uniquely malevolent kind. Enemy forces invading a host’s body and using that body like a walkie-talkie to communicate with each other and influence the brain from afar. Hughes thinks the fungus might also exert more direct control over the ant’s muscles, literally controlling them “as a puppeteer controls as a marionette doll.” Once an infection is underway, he says, the neurons in the ant’s body—the ones that give its brain control over its muscles—start to die. Hughes suspects that the fungus takes over. It effectively cuts the ant’s limbs off from its brain and inserts itself in place, releasing chemicals that force the muscles there to contract. If this is right, then the ant ends its life as a prisoner in its own body. Its brain is still in the driver’s seat, but the fungus has the wheel.
biology  gross  cordyceps  fungi  fungus  ants  zombies  infection  brain  parasites 
20 days ago by jm
_Could a Neuroscientist Understand a Microprocessor?_
'There is a popular belief in neuroscience that we are primarily data limited, that producing large, multimodal, and complex datasets will, enabled by data analysis algorithms, lead to fundamental insights into the way the brain processes information. Microprocessors are among those artificial information processing systems that are both complex and that we understand at all levels, from the overall logical flow, via logical gates, to the dynamics of transistors. Here we take a simulated classical microprocessor as a model organism, and use our ability to perform arbitrary experiments on it to see if popular data analysis methods from neuroscience can elucidate the way it processes information. We show that the approaches reveal interesting structure in the data but do not meaningfully describe the hierarchy of information processing in the processor. This suggests that current approaches in neuroscience may fall short of producing meaningful models of the brain.'

via Bryan O'Sullivan.
via:bos  neuroscience  microprocessors  6502  computers  hardware  wetware  brain  biology  neural-systems 
june 2016 by jm
How big an issue is the nausea problem for Virtual Reality products? - Quora
Sadly (because I want a “holodeck” as much as the next red-blooded geek) - I don’t think it’s possible to make a VR system that both delivers the experience that everyone wants - and doesn’t make a sizeable proportion of the population so sick that they’ll never want to do it again. For the people who can stomach the display - my major concern is that the US Navy studies show that there is some disorientation that might persist long after finishing your game…so driving a car while “under the influence” of post-VR disorientation is probably as dangerous as drunk-driving.

If these devices are in pretty much every home - then there are huge problems in store for the industry in terms of product liability. There have been plenty of warnings from the flight simulation industry - there are no excuses for not reading the Wikipedia article on the subject. If people are driving “under the influence” and the VR companies didn’t warn them about that - then they’re in deep trouble.

IMHO, these consumer-grade VR devices should be carefully studied and if they do cause possible driving impairment, they should be banned until such time as the problems can be fixed…which may very well be “never”. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news.


(via Tony Finch)
holodeck  vr  oculus-rift  hmds  nausea  head-mounted-displays  biology  brain  flight-simulation 
may 2016 by jm
Hangovers aren't caused by dehydration, low blood sugar, or acetaldehyde / Boing Boing
The [now-]leading theory implicates a specific gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a complementary brain receptor, "that responds to low concentrations of ethanol, as produced by one glass of wine, in the brain."
hangovers  booze  brain  biology  biochemistry  gaba  ethanol  alcohol 
january 2016 by jm
The Neurocritic: Fisher-Price Synesthesia
'Synesthesia [jm: sic] is a rare perceptual phenomenon in which the stimulation of one sensory modality, or exposure to one type of stimulus, leads to a sensory (or cognitive) experience in a different, non-stimulated modality. For instance, some synesthetes have colored hearing while others might taste shapes. GRAPHEME-COLOR SYNESTHESIA is the condition in which individual printed letters are perceived in a specific, constant color. This occurs involuntarily and in the absence of colored font. [...] A new study has identified 11 synesthetes whose grapheme-color mappings appear to be based on the Fisher Price plastic letter set made between 1972-1990.'

(via Dave Green)
fisher-price  synesthesia  synaesthesia  colors  colours  sight  neuroscience  brain  via-dave-green  toys 
january 2013 by jm
Dan McKinley :: Effective Web Experimentation as a Homo Narrans
Good demo from Etsy's A/B testing, of how the human brain can retrofit a story onto statistically-insignificant results. To fix: 'avoid building tooling that enables fishing expeditions; limit our post-hoc rationalization by explicitly constraining it before the experiment. Whenever we test a feature on Etsy, we begin the process by identifying metrics that we believe will change if we 1) understand what is happening and 2) get the effect we desire.'
testing  etsy  statistics  a-b-testing  fishing  ulysses-contract  brain  experiments 
january 2013 by jm
How Little Sleep Can You Get Away With?
'after just a few days, the four- and six-hour group reported that, yes, they were slightly sleepy. But they insisted they had adjusted to their new state. Even 14 days into the study, they said sleepiness was not affecting them. In fact, their performance had tanked. In other words, the sleep-deprived among us are lousy judges of our own sleep needs. We are not nearly as sharp as we think we are.'
sleep  rest  brain  science  neuroscience 
april 2011 by jm
Zero stroke - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
'With the price of bread running into billions a loaf the German people [...] had to get used to counting in thousands of billions. This, according to some German physicians, brought on a new nervous disease known as "zero stroke," or "cipher stroke" [...] The persons afflicted with the malady are perfectly normal, except "for a desire to write endless rows of ciphers and engage in computations more involved than the most difficult problems in logarithms."' (via Joe Drumgoole)
germany  zero  hyperinflation  inflation  via:jdrumgoole  money  brain  mental-illness  from delicious
february 2011 by jm

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