jm + borg   4

A Decade Of Container Control At Google
The big thing that can be gleaned from the latest paper out of Google on its container controllers is that the shift from bare metal to containers is a profound one – something that may not be obvious to everyone seeking containers as a better way – and we think cheaper way – of doing server virtualization and driving up server utilization higher. Everything becomes application-centric rather than machine-centric, which is the nirvana that IT shops have been searching for. The workload schedulers, cluster managers, and container controllers work together to get the right capacity to the application when it needs it, whether it is a latency-sensitive job or a batch job that has some slack in it, and all that the site recovery engineers and developers care about is how the application is performing and they can easily see that because all of the APIs and metrics coming out of them collect data at the application level, not on a per-machine basis. To do this means adopting containers, period. There is no bare metal at Google, and let that be a lesson to HPC shops or other hyperscalers or cloud builders that think they need to run in bare metal mode.
google  containers  kubernetes  borg  bare-metal  ops 
april 2016 by jm
Eric Brewer interview on Kubernetes
What is the relationship between Kubernetes, Borg and Omega (the two internal resource-orchestration systems Google has built)?

I would say, kind of by definition, there’s no shared code but there are shared people.

You can think of Kubernetes — especially some of the elements around pods and labels — as being lessons learned from Borg and Omega that are, frankly, significantly better in Kubernetes. There are things that are going to end up being the same as Borg — like the way we use IP addresses is very similar — but other things, like labels, are actually much better than what we did internally.

I would say that’s a lesson we learned the hard way.
google  architecture  kubernetes  docker  containers  borg  omega  deployment  ops 
may 2015 by jm
Kubernetes compared to Borg
'Here are four Kubernetes features that came from our experiences with Borg.'
google  ops  kubernetes  borg  containers  docker  networking 
april 2015 by jm
Large-scale cluster management at Google with Borg
Google's Borg system is a cluster manager that runs hundreds of thousands of jobs, from many thousands of different applications, across a number of clusters each with up to tens of thousands of machines. It achieves high utilization by combining admission control, efficient task-packing, over-commitment, and machine sharing with process-level performance isolation. It supports high-availability applications with runtime features that minimize fault-recovery time, and scheduling policies that reduce the probability of correlated failures. Borg simplifies life for its users by offering a declarative job specification language, name service integration, real-time job monitoring, and tools to analyze and simulate system behavior.
We present a summary of the Borg system architecture and features, important design decisions, a quantitative analysis of some of its policy decisions, and a qualitative examination of lessons learned from a decade of operational experience with it.


(via Conall)
via:conall  clustering  google  papers  scale  to-read  borg  cluster-management  deployment  packing  reliability  redundancy 
april 2015 by jm

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