jm + books   39

European Commission study finds no link between piracy and lower sales of digital content
According to the report, an average of 51% of adults and 72% of minors in the EU have pirated digital content, with Poland and Spain averaging the highest rates of all countries surveyed. Nevertheless, displacement rates (the impact of piracy on legitimate sales) were found to be negligible or non-existent for music, books and games, while rates for films and TV were in line with previous digital piracy studies.

Most interesting is the fact that the study found that illegal game downloads actually lead to an increase in legal purchases. The report concludes that tactics like video game microtransactions are proving effective in converting illegal users to paying users.

The full report goes in-depth regarding potential factors influencing piracy and the challenges of accurately tracking its impact on legitimate sales, but the researchers ultimately conclude that there is no robust statistical evidence that illegal downloads reduce legal sales. That's big news, which makes it all the more troubling that the EU effectively buried it for two years.
piracy  eu  studies  downloads  ec  games  movies  books  content 
27 days ago by jm
Normietivity: A Review of Angela Nagle's Kill all Normies
Due to a persistent vagueness in targets and refusal to respond to the best arguments presented by those she loosely groups together, Nagle does not provide the thoroughgoing and immanent treatment of the left which would be required to achieve the profound intervention she clearly intended. Nor does she grapple with the difficult implications figures like Greer (with her transphobic campaign against a vulnerable colleague) and Milo (with his direct advocacy for the nativist and carceral state) present for free speech absolutists. And indeed, the blurring their specifically shared transphobia causes for distinguishing between left and right wing social analysis.

In genre terms, Nagle’s writing is best described as travel writing for internet culture. Kill All Normies provides a string of curios and oddities (from neo-nazi cults, to inscrutably gendered teenagers) to an audience expected to find them unfamiliar, and titillating. Nagle attempts to cast herself as an aloof and wry explorer, but at various points her commitments become all too clear. Nagle implicitly casts her reader as the eponymous normies, overlooking those of us who live through lives with transgenders, in the wake of colonialism, despite invisible disabilities (including depression), and all the rest.

This is both a shame and a missed opportunity, because the deadly violence the Alt-Right has proven itself capable of is in urgent need of evaluation, but so too are the very real dysfunctions which afflict the left (both online and IRL). After this book patient, discerning, explanatory, and immanent readings of internet culture remain sorely needed. The best that can be said for Kill All Normies is, as the old meme goes, “An attempt was made.”
angela-nagle  normies  books  reading  transphobia  germaine-greer  milo  alt-right  politics  internet  4chan 
4 weeks ago by jm
How Google Book Search Got Lost – Backchannel
There are plenty of other explanations for the dampening of Google’s ardor: The bad taste left from the lawsuits. The rise of shiny and exciting new ventures with more immediate payoffs. And also: the dawning realization that Scanning All The Books, however useful, might not change the world in any fundamental way.
books  reading  google  library  lawsuits  legal  scanning  book-search  search 
april 2017 by jm
Google - Site Reliability Engineering
The Google SRE book is now online, for free
sre  google  ops  books  reading 
january 2017 by jm
"The couple, who had no experience of wine-making but much faith in professorial expertise…"
I love this story -- a wealthy couple buy a vineyard in the Languedoc for its theoretically-optimal microclimate for wine-making. Defying what one's preconceptions would expect (mine included!), the results were fantastic.

In the Languedoc there is a vineyard that teaches us an important lesson about textbook learning and its application to the world. In the early Seventies it was bought by a wealthy couple, who consulted professors Emile Peynaud and Henri Enjalbert, the world’s leading academic oenologist and oenological geologist respectively. Between them these men convinced the couple that their new vineyard had a theoretically ideal microclimate for wine-making. When planted with theoretically ideal vines whose fruits would be processed in the optimal way according to the up-to-date science of oenology, this vineyard had the potential to produce wine to match the great first growths of Bordeaux. The received wisdom that great wine was the product of an inscrutable (and untransferable) tradition was quite mistaken, the professors said: it could be done with hard work and a fanatical attention to detail. The couple, who had no experience of wine-making but much faith in professorial expertise, took a deep breath and went ahead.

If life were reliably like novels, their experiment would have been a disaster. In fact Aimé and Véronique Guibert have met with a success so unsullied that it would make a stupefying novel (it has already been the subject of a comatogenic work of non-fiction). The first vintage they declared (in 1978) was described by Gault Millau as ‘Château Lafite du Languedoc’; others have been praised to the heights by the likes of Hugh Johnson and Robert Parker. The wine is now on the list at the Tour d’Argent and the 1986 vintage retails at the vineyard for £65 a bottle. The sole shadow on the lives of these millionaires is cast by the odd hailstorm.

No one to whom I have begun recounting the story believes it will end well. Most people are extremely unwilling to grant that faith in textbook knowledge should ever be crowned with success. We have a very strong narrative bias against such stories. It is a bias we forget once our children fall sick or we have to travel in an aeroplane, but so long as we are in storytelling mode we simply deny that systematic textbook reasoning can make headway against whimsy and serendipity. Apart from anything else, it is deeply unfair that it should.
books  science  languedoc  wine  academia  microclimates  preconceptions 
september 2016 by jm
Tekkonkinkreet Art Book Shinji Kimura - White Side: Shinji Kimura: 9784870317659: Amazon.com: Books
Beautiful background art from a 2006 anime by Shinji Kimura, as a 10" x 7" full-colour hardback art book.
hardback  books  toget  anime  manga  tekkonkinkreet 
september 2016 by jm
Before the World Forgets Antarctica's First Great Author: The Fascinating Life and Death of Nick Johnson
RIP. "Big Dead Place" is a fantastic document of "M*A*S*H on ice", as the London Times called it, and one of my favourite books. See also http://feralhouse.com/nick-johnson-rip/ for another eulogy from his publishers
big-dead-place  nick-johnson  rip  eulogies  books  reading  history  antarctica  exploration  raytheon  bureaucracy 
may 2016 by jm
Review: Site Reliability Engineering
John "lusis" Vincent reviews the SRE book, not 100% positively
sre  books  reading  reviews  lusis 
april 2016 by jm
Dan Luu reviews the Site Reliability Engineering book
voluminous! still looks great, looking forward to reading our copy (via Tony Finch)
via:fanf  books  reading  devops  ops  google  sre  dan-luu 
april 2016 by jm
Wired on the new O'Reilly SRE book
"Site Reliability Engineering: How Google Runs Production Systems", by Chris Jones, Betsy Beyer, Niall Richard Murphy, Jennifer Petoff. Go Niall!
google  sre  niall-murphy  ops  devops  oreilly  books  toread  reviews 
april 2016 by jm
Doodletown
Excellent drawing books from Chris Judge and his brother Andrew. gotta get this:

'WELCOME TO DOODLETOWN, the home of the Doodles. It is a very nice town, except for one SMALL problem. Everything is half drawn with bits and pieces missing! The Doodles are going to need YOUR help. So grab a pen or a pencil and help finish the adventure!'
doodles  kids  drawing  books  toget  chris-judge 
february 2016 by jm
Brand New Retro – The Book, November 2015
YESSSS. Joe and Brian have delivered -- going to be giving a lot of copies of this for xmas ;)
brand-new-retro  blogs  friends  retro  history  dublin  ireland  books  toget 
october 2015 by jm
Redditor runs the secret Python code in Ex Machina
and finds:
when you run with python2.7 you get the following:
ISBN = 9780199226559
Which is Embodiment and the inner life: Cognition and Consciousness in the Space of Possible Minds. and so now I have a lot more respect for the Director.
python  movies  ex-machina  cool  books  easter-eggs 
may 2015 by jm
Writing Minecraft Plugins - The Book
wow, Walter Higgins' book (from Peachpit Press) is looking great
books  reading  minecraft  walter-higgins  javascript 
april 2015 by jm
Working Time, Knowledge Work and Post-Industrial Society: Unpredictable Work - Aileen O'Carroll
my friend Aileen has written a book -- looks interesting:

I will argue that a key feature of working time within high-tech industries is unpredictability, which alters the way time is experienced and perceived. It affects all aspects of time, from working hours to work organisation, to career, to the distinction between work and life. Although many desire variety in work and the ability to control working hours, unpredictability causes dissatisfaction.


On Amazon.co.uk at: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Working-Time-Knowledge-Post-Industrial-Society-ebook/dp/B00VILIN4U
books  reading  time  work  society  tech  working-hours  job  life  sociology 
april 2015 by jm
Goodnight Clock
Burrito Justice nerds out on 'Goodnight Moon'. 'Maybe the bunny and the old lady are actually in a space elevator, getting closer to the moon as he gets into bed? Or as suggested by @transitmaps, the bunny can bend space and time? I do not have a good answer to this conundrum, but that is what the comments are for.'
goodnight-moon  moon  space  time  space-elevators  childrens-books  books  physics 
march 2014 by jm
The Hands That Made The Moomins
lovely New Yorker writeup on Tove Jansson, author of those beautiful children's books
tove-jansson  moomins  books  childrens-books  reading  literature  via:etienneshrdlu 
march 2014 by jm
British Library uploads one million public domain images to the net for remix and reuse - Boing Boing
this is excellent!
The British Library has uploaded one million public domain scans from 17th-19th century books to Flickr! They're embarking on an ambitious programme to crowdsource novel uses and navigation tools for the huge corpus. Already, the manifest of image descriptions is available through Github. This is a remarkable, public spirited, archival project, and the British Library is to be loudly applauded for it!
british-library  libraries  public-domain  art  graphics  images  history  19th-century  17th-century  18th-century  books  crowdsourcing  via:boingboing  github 
december 2013 by jm
Codex Seraphinianus: A new edition of the strangest book in the world
Excited! one commenter claims a paperback of the new edition of Luigi Serafini's masterwork should cost about $75 when it comes out in a couple of months. sign me up, this is an amazing work
codex-seraphinianus  art  weird  strange  books  luigi-serafini 
october 2013 by jm
The Hole in Our Collective Memory: How Copyright Made Mid-Century Books Vanish - Rebecca J. Rosen - The Atlantic
A book published during the presidency of Chester A. Arthur has a greater chance of being in print today than one published during the time of Reagan.
This is not a gently sloping downward curve. Publishers seem unwilling to sell their books on Amazon for more than a few years after their initial publication. The data suggest that publishing business models make books disappear fairly shortly after their publication and long before they are scheduled to fall into the public domain. Copyright law then deters their reappearance as long as they are owned. On the left side of the graph before 1920, the decline presents a more gentle time-sensitive downward sloping curve.
business  books  legal  copyright  law  public-domain  reading  history  publishers  amazon  papers 
september 2013 by jm
Comics For Children…. a visual list…. | The Forbidden Planet International Blog
some great recommendations here. Hildafolk has been popular with my 5-year-old, must pick up a few more
comics  kids  children  books  reading  library  toget  toread 
july 2013 by jm
One Year Later, the Results of Tor Books UK Going DRM-Free
As it is, we’ve seen no discernible increase in piracy on any of our titles, despite them being DRM-free for nearly a year.
tor  ebooks  drm  piracy  copy-protection  books 
may 2013 by jm
A History Of Ireland In 100 Objects
Now free!
The Royal Irish Academy, the National Museum of Ireland, and The Irish Times are collaborating with the EU Presidency, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and Adobe to bring you a gift of A History of Ireland in 100 objects ‘from the people of Ireland to the people of the world’ for St Patrick’s Day. It is available as an interactive app for Apple iPhone and iPad, for most Android tablets and on the Kindle Fire, from our website, as well as associated app stores. You can also experience the book on your computer, smartphone or eReader by clicking on the 'eBook' button below. The gift is free to download until the end of March. 
free  st-patricks-day  museum  ireland  history  objects  eu  apps  iphone  ipad  android  books  ebooks 
march 2013 by jm
Bunnie Huang's "Hacking the Xbox" now available as a free PDF
'No Starch Press and I have decided to release this free ebook version of Hacking the Xbox in honor of Aaron Swartz. As you read this book, I hope that you’ll be reminded of how important freedom is to the hacking community and that you’ll be inclined to support the causes that Aaron believed in.

I agreed to release this book for free in part because Aaron’s treatment by MIT is not unfamiliar to me. In this book, you will find the story of when I was an MIT graduate student, extracting security keys from the original Microsoft Xbox. You’ll also read about the crushing disappointment of receiving a letter from MIT legal repudiating any association with my work, effectively leaving me on my own to face Microsoft.

The difference was that the faculty of my lab, the AI laboratory, were outraged by this treatment. They openly defied MIT legal and vowed to publish my work as an official “AI Lab Memo,” thereby granting me greater negotiating leverage with Microsoft. Microsoft, mindful of the potential backlash from the court of public opinion over suing a legitimate academic researcher, came to a civil understanding with me over the issue.'

This is a classic text on hardware reverse-engineering and the freedom to tinker -- strongly recommended.
hacking  bunnie-huang  xbox  free  hardware  drm  freedom-to-tinker  books  reading  mit  microsoft  history 
march 2013 by jm
"Security Engineering" now online in full
Ross Anderson says: 'I’m delighted to announce that my book Security Engineering – A Guide to Building Dependable Distributed Systems is now available free online in its entirety. You may download any or all of the chapters from the book’s web page.'
security  books  reference  coding  software  encryption  ross-anderson 
february 2013 by jm
"Matters Computational - Ideas, Algorithms, Source Code"
A hefty tome (in PDF format) containing lots of interesting algorithms and computational tricks; code is GPLv3 licensed
coding  algorithms  computation  via:cliffc  pdf  books 
january 2013 by jm
Ingenious Dublin
Excellent stuff, by Mary Mulvihill:

Where in Dublin can you see a Victorian diving bell? What about the skeleton of Tommy, the prince’s elephant? The site of the world’s first earthquake experiment? Or the world’s sports pirate radio broadcast? Our new e-book Ingenious Dublin has all these fascinating stories and more. It is packed with information, places to visit, and lots of illustrations, and covers the city and county, from Skerries windmills to Ballybetagh’s fossil deer.'


EUR 4.99 for the Kindle e-book. I'll buy that!
kindle  reading  books  mary-mulvihill  science  facts  dublin  ireland  history 
october 2012 by jm
Marsh's Library
Dublin museum of antiquarian books, open to the public -- well worth a visit, apparently (I will definitely be making my way there soon I suspect), to check out their new "Marvels of Science" exhibit. Not only that though, but they have a beautiful website with some great photos -- exemplary
museum  dublin  ireland  libraries  books  science 
july 2012 by jm
The story of St. Columba: A modern copyright battle in sixth century Ireland
a good summary of the roots of copyright, the Columcille "To every cow belongs its calf; to every book its copy" story (via TJ McIntyre)
columcille  copyright  history  ireland  columbanus  books 
june 2012 by jm
Open Data Structures
A free-as-in-speech as well as -beer textbook of data structures, covering a great range, including some I hadn't heard of before. Here's the full list: ArrayStack, FastArrayStack, ArrayQueue, ArrayDeque, DualArrayDeque, RootishArrayStack, SLList, DLList,
SEList, SkiplistSSet, SkiplistList, ChainedHashTable, LinearHashTable, BinaryTree, BinarySearchTree, Treap, ScapegoatTree, RedBlackTree, BinaryHeap, MeldableHeap, AdjacencyMatrix, AdjacencyLists, BinaryTrie, XFastTrie, and YFastTrie
algorithms  books  data-structures  computer-science  coding  tries  skiplists  arrays  queues  heap  trees  graphs  hashtables 
may 2012 by jm
Infovore » A Year of Links
'I thought it would be interesting to produce a kind of personal encylopedia: each volume cataloguing the links for a whole year. Given I first used Delicious in 2004, that makes for eight books to date.' Printed via Lulu, with a tag index. Really nifty ;)
books  archives  bookmarks  pinboard  delicious  links  personal  history  via:pinboard 
february 2012 by jm
the legend of St. Columba, patron saint of copyright infringers
'At this point IPKat team member Jeremy dons his old academic hat and excitedly draws attention to some research he did on the St Columba case.  The goodly saint was given access to a psalter that was in the possession of Abbot Finian in around the year 560.  A psalter is a book of psalms -- definitely public domain stuff, having been compiled during the reign of King David, who is generally reckoned to have died around 970 years before the common era.  Even on a life + 70 year basis, copyright would have expired around getting on for 1,500 years before Columba came on to the scene.  Having illicitly copied the psalter he refused to deliver it up to King Dermot of Tara, who famously said “to every cow its calf, to every book its copy” -- not "to every cow its calf, to every author his work".  Anyway, to cut a long story short, Columba refused to hand it over, fled the country for the safety of England (like the founder of Wikileaks), converted the Picts to Christianity, settled in Iona and became a saint.  You can read this all in "St Columba the Copyright Infringer" [1985] 12 European Intellectual Property Review 350-353.' (via Eoin O'Dell). Someone fill in the misquoting High Court judges....
st-columba  books  via:cearta  ireland  law  history  filesharing  copyright 
november 2011 by jm
The Best Science Fiction Books (According to Reddit)
contains a surprisingly-large number which I haven't read
scifi  fiction  books  science-fiction 
september 2011 by jm
Unbound: The Crowdfunding Cargo Cult – Telegraph Blogs
'why was Unbound set up in the first place? It’s because they constructed a cargo cult, believing that if they mimicked the superficial elements of successful crowdfunding, they could enjoy the same success as others – but perhaps even more, thanks to their relationships with publishers, agents, authors, and the media.' They're not the only Kickstarter-cargo-culting company, too. via waxy
via:waxy  unbound  kickstarter  cargo-cult  funding  crowdfunding  books  uk 
july 2011 by jm
Science fiction: The stories of now - 16 September 2009 - New Scientist
(via Pierce) Kim Stanley Robinson on today's British SF "golden age". I have a lot of reading to catch up on
sf  science-fiction  uk  scifi  kim-stanley-robinson  new-scientist  culture  toread  books  from delicious
september 2009 by jm

related tags

4chan  17th-century  18th-century  19th-century  academia  algorithms  alt-right  amazon  android  angela-nagle  anime  antarctica  apps  archives  arrays  art  big-dead-place  blogs  book-search  bookmarks  books  brand-new-retro  british-library  bunnie-huang  bureaucracy  business  cargo-cult  children  childrens-books  chris-judge  codex-seraphinianus  coding  columbanus  columcille  comics  computation  computer-science  content  cool  copy-protection  copyright  costumes  crowdfunding  crowdsourcing  culture  dan-luu  danger-is-everywhere  data-structures  delicious  development  devops  doodles  downloads  drawing  drm  dublin  easter-eggs  ebooks  ec  education  encryption  eu  eulogies  ex-machina  exploration  facts  fiction  filesharing  free  freedom-to-tinker  friends  funding  games  germaine-greer  github  goodnight-moon  google  graphics  graphs  hacking  halloween  hardback  hardware  hashtables  heap  history  illustration  images  internet  ipad  iphone  ireland  javascript  job  kickstarter  kids  kim-stanley-robinson  kindle  languedoc  law  lawsuits  legal  libraries  library  life  links  literature  luigi-serafini  lusis  manga  mary-mulvihill  microclimates  microsoft  milo  minecraft  mit  moomins  moon  movies  museum  mysteries  new-scientist  niall-murphy  nick-johnson  noel-zone  normies  objects  ops  oreilly  papers  pdf  personal  physics  pinboard  piracy  politics  pranks  preconceptions  public-domain  publishers  python  queues  raytheon  reading  reference  retro  reviews  rip  ross-anderson  san-francisco  scanning  science  science-fiction  scifi  search  security  sf  silicon-valley  skiplists  society  sociology  software  space  space-elevators  sre  st-columba  st-patricks-day  startups  strange  studies  tech  tekkonkinkreet  the-hobbit  time  toget  tolkien  tor  toread  tove-jansson  transphobia  trees  tries  uk  unbound  via:boingboing  via:cearta  via:cliffc  via:etienneshrdlu  via:fanf  via:ianmoore  via:pinboard  via:waxy  walter-higgins  weird  wine  work  working-hours  xbox 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: