jm + baidu   2

Google used a Baidu front-end to scrape user searches without consent
The engineers used the data they pulled from [acquired Baidu front-end site] 265.com to learn about the kinds of things that people located in mainland China routinely search for in Mandarin. This helped them to build a prototype of Dragonfly. The engineers used the sample queries from 265.com, for instance, to review lists of websites Chinese people would see if they typed the same word or phrase into Google. They then used a tool they called “BeaconTower” to check whether any websites in the Google search results would be blocked by China’s internet censorship system, known as the Great Firewall. Through this process, the engineers compiled a list of thousands of banned websites, which they integrated into the Dragonfly search platform so that it would purge links to websites prohibited in China, such as those of the online encyclopedia Wikipedia and British news broadcaster BBC.

Under normal company protocol, analysis of people’s search queries is subject to tight constraints and should be reviewed by the company’s privacy staff, whose job is to safeguard user rights. But the privacy team only found out about the 265.com data access after The Intercept revealed it, and were “really pissed,” according to one Google source.
china  search  tech  google  privacy  baidu  interception  censorship  great-firewall  dragonfly 
4 weeks ago by jm
Chinese authorities compromise millions in cyberattacks
"[The] Great Firewall [of China] has switched from being a passive, inbound filter to being an active and aggressive outbound one."
china  great-firewall  censorship  cyberwarfare  github  ddos  baidu  future 
march 2015 by jm

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