jm + bacteria   5

Rule that patients must finish antibiotics course is wrong, study says
Patients have traditionally been told that they must complete courses of antibiotics, the theory being that taking too few tablets will allow the bacteria causing their disease to mutate and become resistant to the drug.
But Martin Llewelyn, a professor in infectious diseases at Brighton and Sussex medical school, and colleagues claim that this is not the case. In an analysis in the British Medical Journal, the experts say “the idea that stopping antibiotic treatment early encourages antibiotic resistance is not supported by evidence, while taking antibiotics for longer than necessary increases the risk of resistance”.
health  medicine  antibiotics  bmj  bacteria 
24 days ago by jm
A programming language for E. coli
Mind = blown.
MIT biological engineers have created a programming language that allows them to rapidly design complex, DNA-encoded circuits that give new functions to living cells. Using this language, anyone can write a program for the function they want, such as detecting and responding to certain environmental conditions. They can then generate a DNA sequence that will achieve it.
"It is literally a programming language for bacteria," says Christopher Voigt, an MIT professor of biological engineering. "You use a text-based language, just like you're programming a computer. Then you take that text and you compile it and it turns it into a DNA sequence that you put into the cell, and the circuit runs inside the cell."
dna  mit  e-coli  bacteria  verilog  programming  coding  biohacking  science 
april 2016 by jm
Accretion Disc Series - Clint Fulkerson
available as prints -- vector art with a hint of the bacterial
algorithms  art  graphics  vector  bacteria  petri-dish  clint-fulkerson 
november 2015 by jm
A gut microbe that stops food allergies
Actual scientific research showing that antibiotic use may be implicated in allergies:

'Nagler’s team first confirmed that mice given antibiotics early in life were far more susceptible to peanut sensitization, a model of human peanut allergy. Then, they introduced a solution containing Clostridia, a common class of bacteria that’s naturally found in the mammalian gut, into the rodents’ mouths and stomachs. The animals’ food allergen sensitization disappeared, the team reports online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. When the scientists instead introduced another common kind of healthy bacteria, called Bacteroides, into similarly allergy-prone mice, they didn’t see the same effect. Studying the rodents more carefully, the researchers determined that Clostridia were having a surprising effect on the mouse gut: Acting through certain immune cells, the bacteria helped keep peanut proteins that can cause allergic reactions out of the bloodstream. “The bacteria are maintaining the integrity of the [intestinal] barrier,” Nagler says.'
allergies  health  food  peanuts  science  research  clostridium  bacteria  gut  intestines  immune-system  mice  papers  pnas 
september 2014 by jm
This Bacteria is Violating Copyright | tor.com | Science fiction and fantasy | Blog posts
the Joyce estate playing their usual role. 'are we now nearing a point where copyright law can result in the retraction of a life form?' (via John Looney)
copyright  dna  bacteria  james-joyce  joyce-estate  frivolous  lawsuits  copyfight  craig-venter  from delicious
april 2011 by jm

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