jm + babies   9

Baby laughing hysterically at ripping paper [video]
classic Youtube unicorn chaser, saving for future use
unicorn-chaser  youtube  funny  babies  paper  videos  ffu 
may 2017 by jm
The Internet Thinks I’m Still Pregnant - The New York Times
This is pretty awful -- an accidental, careless and brutal side effect of marketers passing on sensitive info to one another, without respect for their users' privacy:

'I hadn’t realized, however, that when I had entered my information into the pregnancy app, the company would then share it with marketing groups targeting new mothers. Although I logged my miscarriage into the app and stopped using it, that change in status apparently wasn’t passed along. Seven months after my miscarriage, mere weeks before my due date, I came home from work to find a package on my welcome mat. It was a box of baby formula bearing the note: “We may all do it differently, but the joy of parenthood is something we all share.”'
privacy  pregnancy  miscarriage  data-protection  apps  babies  parenthood 
september 2016 by jm
The Melancholy Mystery of Lullabies - NYTimes.com
Fascinating article on lullabies:

One way a mother might bond with a newborn is by sharing her joy; another way is by sharing her grief or frustration. We see this in songs across time. A 200-year-old Arabic lullaby still sung today goes:

I am a stranger, and my neighbors are strangers;
I have no friends in this world.
Winter night and the husband is absent.

And an old Spanish lullaby from Asturias, written down by the poet Federico García Lorca, goes:

This little boy clinging so
Is from a lover, Vitorio,
May God, who gave, end my woe,
Take this Vitorio clinging so.

We assume the sound of these songs is sweet, as no lullaby endures without being effective at putting babies to sleep. Think of ‘‘Rock-a-bye Baby,’’ the way it tenderly describes an infant and its cradle falling to the ground: The singer gets to speak a fear, the baby gets to rest; the singer tries to accommodate herself to a possible loss that has for most of human history been rela­tively common, and the baby gets attentive care. In the Arabic and Spanish lullabies, the singers get to say something to the one being — their new burden, their new love — who can’t and won’t judge or discipline them for saying it. When even relatively happy, well-supported people become the primary caretaker of a very small person, they tend to find themselves eddied out from the world of adults. They are never alone — there is always that tiny person — and yet they are often lonely. Old songs let us feel the fellowship of these other people, across space and time, also holding babies in dark rooms.
lullabies  songs  singing  history  folk  babies  children 
april 2016 by jm
The science behind "don't drink when pregnant" is rubbish
As the economist Emily Oster pointed out in her 2013 book Expecting Better, there is also no “proven safe” level of Tylenol or caffeine, and yet both are fine in moderation during pregnancy. Oster pored through reams of research on alcohol and pregnancy for her book and concluded that there is simply no scientific evidence that light drinking during pregnancy impacts a baby’s health. (In one frequently cited 2001 study that suggested light drinking in pregnancy increases the chances of a child displaying aggressive behaviors, the drinkers were also significantly likelier to have taken cocaine during pregnancy.)


My wife also followed the paper trail on this issue in the past. In the papers from which these recommendations were derived, the level of drinking at which any effects were observed in babies was when women consumed at least *9 units every day* for the entire pregnancy. That's an entire bottle of wine, daily!
booze  alcohol  science  facts  papers  medicine  emily-oster  babies  pregnancy  pre-pregnant  research 
february 2016 by jm
Where do 'mama'/'papa' words come from?
The sounds came first — as experiments in vocalization — and parents adopted them as pet names for themselves.

If you open your mouth and make a sound, it will probably be an open vowel like /a/ unless you move your tongue or lips. The easiest consonants are perhaps the bilabials /m/, /p/, and /b/, requiring no movement of the tongue, followed by consonants made by raising the front of the tongue: /d/, /t/, and /n/. Add a dash of reduplication, and you get mama, papa, baba, dada, tata, nana.

That such words refer to people (typically parents or other guardians) is something we have imposed on the sounds and incorporated into our languages and cultures; the meanings don’t inhere in the sounds as uttered by babies, which are more likely calls for food or attention.
sounds  voice  speech  babies  kids  phonetics  linguist  language 
october 2015 by jm
How to Name a Baby
some good data (and graphs) on baby names (via Ruth)
via:ruth  babies  naming  graphs  dataviz  data  usa  names 
january 2014 by jm
Arthur Recreates Scenes from Classic Movies
bored on maternity leave, this is what happens (via Niamh)
movies  babies  funny  via:niamh 
july 2011 by jm
teeandtoast.com
quite a few excellent teeshirts, along with tea-related items -- and again they have a great kids' range. based in Northern Ireland! (via Ruth)
ireland  shopping  clothing  tees  tshirts  gifts  tea  babies  from delicious
november 2009 by jm
CradleRock.ie
Dublin shop selling fairly-traded and cool kids clothes and accessories; they also do stalls at various local markets now and again. think Mae and Bea have a few of their goods already ;)
kids  shopping  gifts  toys  babies  baby  dublin  ireland  fairtrade  from delicious
november 2009 by jm

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