jm + b-trees   6

The Case for Learned Index Structures
'Indexes are models: a B-Tree-Index can be seen as a model to map a key to the position of a record within a sorted array, a Hash-Index as a model to map a key to a position of a record within an unsorted array, and a BitMap-Index as a model to indicate if a data record exists or not. In this exploratory research paper, we start from this premise and posit that all existing index structures can be replaced with other types of models, including deep-learning models, which we term learned indexes. The key idea is that a model can learn the sort order or structure of lookup keys and use this signal to effectively predict the position or existence of records. We theoretically analyze under which conditions learned indexes outperform traditional index structures and describe the main challenges in designing learned index structures. Our initial results show, that by using neural nets we are able to outperform cache-optimized B-Trees by up to 70% in speed while saving an order-of-magnitude in memory over several real-world data sets. More importantly though, we believe that the idea of replacing core components of a data management system through learned models has far reaching implications for future systems designs and that this work just provides a glimpse of what might be possible.'

Excellent follow-up thread from Henry Robinson: https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/940344992723120128

'The fact that the learned representation is more compact is very neat. But also it's not really a surprise that, given the entire dataset, we can construct a more compact function than a B-tree which is *designed* to support efficient updates.' [...] 'given that the model performs best when trained on the whole data set - I strongly doubt B-trees are the best we can do with the current state-of-the art.'
data-structures  ml  google  b-trees  storage  indexes  deep-learning  henry-robinson 
5 weeks ago by jm
Memory Layouts for Binary Search
Key takeaway:
Nearly uni­ver­sally, B-trees win when the data gets big enough.
caches  cpu  performance  optimization  memory  binary-search  b-trees  algorithms  search  memory-layout 
may 2015 by jm
The Bw-Tree: A B-tree for New Hardware - Microsoft Research
The emergence of new hardware and platforms has led to reconsideration of how data management systems are designed. However, certain basic functions such as key indexed access to records remain essential. While we exploit the common architectural layering of prior systems, we make radically new design decisions about each layer. Our new form of B tree, called the Bw-tree achieves its very high performance via a latch-free approach that effectively exploits the processor caches of modern multi-core chips. Our storage manager uses a unique form of log structuring that blurs the distinction between a page and a record store and works well with flash storage. This paper describes the architecture and algorithms for the Bw-tree, focusing on the main memory aspects. The paper includes results of our experiments that demonstrate that this fresh approach produces outstanding performance.
bw-trees  database  paper  toread  research  algorithms  microsoft  sql  sql-server  b-trees  data-structures  storage  cache-friendly  mechanical-sympathy 
april 2013 by jm
C++ B-Tree
a new C++ template library from Google which implements an in-memory B-Tree container type, suitable for use as a drop-in replacement for std::map, set, multimap and multiset. Lower memory use, and reportedly faster due to better cache-friendliness
c++  google  data-structures  containers  b-trees  stl  map  set  open-source 
february 2013 by jm
A short history of btrfs [LWN.net]
wow, sounds good! looking forward to this hitting production-ready status
btrfs  history  zfs  linux  open-source  licensing  storage  sysadmin  b-trees  b+trees  algorithms  fs  filesystems 
august 2009 by jm

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