jm + art   104

"The first AI portrait in Christie’s" was mostly output from someone else's open-source code
The print was created by Obvious, a trio of 25-year-old French students whose goal is to “explain and democratize” AI through art. Over the past year, they’ve made a series of portraits depicting members of the fictional Belamy family, amplifying their work through attention-grabbing press releases. But insiders say the code used to generate these prints is mostly the work of another artist and programmer: 19-year-old Robbie Barrat, a recent high school graduate who shared his algorithms online via an open-source license.

The members of Obvious don’t deny that they borrowed substantially from Barrat’s code, but until recently, they didn’t publicize that fact either. This has created unease for some members of the AI art community, which is open and collaborative and taking its first steps into mainstream attention.[...]

Jason Bailey, a digital art blogger who runs the site Artnome, says that what Obvious has done is far from unusual. “It’s almost weekly in digital art that someone takes some open code and tweaks it and sells it,” he tells The Verge. But the prominence of this auction and the fact that Obvious, not Barrat, has received the attendant prestige and attention does complicate the matter. “There’s a lot of stuff you can do that’s legal, but that makes you sort of a jerk,” adds Bailey. “If I was Robbie, I’d be pretty miffed, and Obvious said they owe him a great deal of credit.”
Barrat says he holds no grudges at all and is mostly annoyed that the auction might give outsiders the wrong impression about AI art. “I’m more concerned about the fact that actual artists using AI are being deprived of the spotlight,” he says. “It’s a very bad first impression for the field to have.”
ai  art  graphics  history  open-source  ownership  copyright  obvious  robbie-barrat  digital 
18 days ago by jm
Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature
Marie Foulston, curator of the V&A's "Videogames: Design/Play/Disrupt" exhibition, on Twitter: "Also grateful that @taleoftales brought us to the 'Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature'. Curious & unsettling place that perfectly mixes the analogue, the digital and the weird. Gave me a smiliar feeling as the Museum of Jurassic Technology & Ghibli Museum at times"
exhibitions  art  paris  museums  to-see  weird 
22 days ago by jm
LOLWUT: a piece of art inside a database command - <antirez>
Redis now includes a reference to "Schotter", by Georg Nees, one of the earliest pieces of computer art. Nice one antirez :)
antirez  coding  art  georg-nees  redis  lolwut 
26 days ago by jm
Linocuts by Gail Brodholt
scenes from London transit infrastructure. There's a fantastic 1960s vibe off these
london  tube  public-transport  prints  art  gail-brodholt  via:mltshp 
10 weeks ago by jm
Why Love Generative Art?
Or as jwz put it, a brief history of generative art
art  generative-art  computer-art  algorithms  graphics  via:jwz 
11 weeks ago by jm
The Great Chinese Art Heist
Liu seems ambivalent toward the plight of burgled museums, especially a place like the Fontainebleau, which he says holds more looted Chinese art than any other institution on earth and advertises the collection's origins as plunder from the sacking of the Old Summer Palace. “Displaying these objects in European museums is like a theft itself—they're just showing it off without concern,” Liu said. “I know that we won't get everything back in my lifetime,” he continued. “We will never give up, we will never stop—no matter the effort. We need [the Chinese] people to see that everything that belonged to us is coming back.”


It's very hard to feel sympathy for the European museums, to be honest....
art  crime  antiquities  heritage  patrimony  china  asia  colonialism  repatriation 
11 weeks ago by jm
The iconic _Fountain_ (1917) was not created by Marcel Duchamp
In 1982 a letter written by Duchamp came to light. Dated 11 April 1917, it was written just a few days after that fateful exhibit. It contains one sentence that should have sent shockwaves through the world of modern art: it reveals the true creator behind Fountain – but it was not Duchamp. Instead he wrote that a female friend using a male alias had sent it in for the New York exhibition. Suddenly a few other things began to make sense. Over time Duchamp had told two different stories of how he had created Fountain, but both turned out to be untrue. An art historian who knew Duchamp admitted that he had never asked him about Fountain, he had published a standard-work on Fountain nevertheless. The place from where Fountain was sent raised more questions. That place was Philadelphia, but Duchamp had been living in New York.

Who was living in Philadelphia? Who was this ‘female friend’ that had sent the urinal using a pseudonym that Duchamp mentions? That woman was, as Duchamp wrote, the future. Art history knows her as Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. She was a brilliant pioneering New York dada artist, and Duchamp knew her well. This glaring truth has been known for some time in the art world, but each time it has to be acknowledged, it is met with indifference and silence.

This article addresses the true authorship of Fountain from the perspective of the latest evidence, collected by several experts. The opinions they voice offer their latest insights.  Their accumulation of evidence strengthens the case to its final conclusion. To attribute Fountain to a woman and not a man has obvious, far-reaching consequences: the history of modern art has to be rewritten. Modern art did not start with a patriarch, but with a matriarch. What power structure in the world of modern art prohibits this truth to become more widely known and generally accepted? Ultimately this is one of the larger questions looming behind the authorship of Fountain. It sheds light on the place and role of the female artist in the world of modern art.
elsa-von-freytag-loringhoven  marcel-duchamp  modern-art  history  art-history  scandals  credit  art  fountain  women 
july 2018 by jm
I am a computer — docubyte
absolutely glorious classic microcomputing GIFs
micros  computing  history  apple  ibm  gifs  images  art 
may 2018 by jm
First bit of Tubular Bells played three times with slight delays so it takes 40 mins to sync - YouTube
'The intro of Tubular Bells played three times with slight delays so it takes 40 minutes to sync AND... randomly generated visual loops from the Exorcist.

That's what I've made happen tonight. No video editor, no music editor - all code.

And it's a trip.'
tubular-bells  the-exorcist  video  art  delay  hacks  trippy 
february 2018 by jm
Fine Art Prints – The Public Domain Review
This is amazing -- "museum quality" prints of favourites from the PDR archives, featuring Paul Klee, William Blake, ukiyo-e from Hiroshige, Goya, and even Athanasius Kircher
prints  to-get  fine-art  public-domain  art  william-blake  ukiyo-e  hiroshige  goya  klee 
november 2017 by jm
Download 67,000 Historic Maps (in High Resolution) from the Wonderful David Rumsey Map Collection | Open Culture
You do not need to be a Stanford student or faculty or staff member to access the vast treasures of the Rumsey Map collection, nor do you need to visit the university or its new Center. Since 1996, the Rumsey collection’s online database has been open to all, currently offering anyone with an internet connection access to 67,000 maps from all over the globe, spanning five centuries of cartography.


(via Oisin)
via:oisin  maps  art  graphics  open-access  mapping  history  david-rumsey  collections 
september 2017 by jm
M00N
a beautifully-glitched photo of the moon by Giacomo Carmagnola; more on his art at http://www.bleaq.com/2015/giacomo-carmagnola . (Via Archillect)
via:archillect  art  giacomo-carmagnola  glitch-art  moon  glitch  images 
august 2017 by jm
A Neural Network Turned a Book of Flowers Into Shockingly Lovely Dinosaur Art
DeepArt.io, 'powered by an algorithm developed by Leon Gatys and a team from the University of Tübingen in Germany', did a really amazing job here
art  dinosaurs  ai  plants  deep-learning  graphics  cool 
june 2017 by jm
Skot Olsen -- Blessed Saint Architeuthis
Classic piece of freaky squid-related art, now purchaseable on giclee for $200! (very tempted)
Saint Architeuthis is the patron saint of doomed sailors. While the origins of the saint remain unclear, it's recent history and worship are well documented. Whalers who turned their attention to catching giant squid and sea serpents in the 19th century, began asking Saint Architeuthis for mercy whenever a hunt would go awry, which was fairly frequent. When hunting for such animals, one would sometimes be thrown over board or a boat would sink exposing the men to whatever was in the water at the time. A sailor would ask Saint Architeuthis for the quick and relatively painless death of drowning, rather than the hideous demise of being ripped apart by the beak of the squid or chewed up in the sea serpent's hideous maw. Often, men would have visions of Saint Architeuthis who would appear before them in the form of a gigantic, yet benevolent squid wearing a bishop's mitre and carrying tools of the squid hunter's trade.
art  squid  skot-olsen  prints  giclees  toget  weird 
may 2017 by jm
To Cite or to Steal? When a Scholarly Project Turns Up in a Gallery
What I was seeing was an announcement for a show by Jason Shulman at Cob Gallery called Photographs of Films. The press and interviews collected on the gallery’s website lauded a conceptual beauty and rigor in his work, but the only thing I could see was a rip-off. “Email for price list.” These images were unmistakably similar to the distinctive work I had been producing for years, and it was not long before friends started writing to let me know.
copyright  art  aggregation  averaging  images  movies  rip-offs  jason-shulman  jason-salavon  kevin-l-ferguson 
may 2017 by jm
A Mind Is Born
A C=64 demo in 256 bytes! Awesome work. Use of an LFSR number generator to create the melody is particularly clever (via Craig)
art  programming  computers  demos  demoscene  c-64  via:craig  lfsr  algorithms 
april 2017 by jm
The Centennial Society's business reply pamphlet | Stop Junk Mail
The classic "office riot" pamphlet...

'The Centennial Society, a radical anti-consumerist movement, has come up with a more arty way of returning junk mail. Pre-paid envelopes can be used to send people working in the junk mail industry information about how to break free. No junk mailer really likes his job; wasting tonnes and tonnes of paper on useless advertisements makes few people feel good about themselves. The Business Reply Pamphlet shows them the way to freedom.'
riot  offices  junk-mail  funny  art  centennial-society  ads  trash-the-gaff 
april 2017 by jm
Docklands Print Commission 2016: Colin Martin
I love Colin's work. just may spring for this one
colin-martin  art  prints  etchings  dublin  history  vinyl 
november 2016 by jm
Video Games Are Boring
I'm not remotely interested in shockingly good graphics, in murder simulators, in guns and knives and swords. I'm not that interested in adrenaline. My own life is thrilling enough. There is enough fear and hatred in the world to get my heart pounding. My Facebook feed and Twitter feed are enough for that. Walking outside in summer clothing is enough for that. I'm interested in care, in characters, in creation, in finding a path forward inside games that helps me find my path forward in life. I am interested in compassion and understanding. I'm interested in connecting. As Miranda July said, "all I ever wanted to know is how other people are making it through life." I want to make games that help other people understand life.

We are all overwhelmed with shock, with information, with change. The degree of interactivity in our lives is amazing and wonderful and I wouldn't exchange it for anything, but it is also shocking and overwhelming and it's causing us to dig in and try to find some peace by shutting each other out. On all sides of the political spectrum we've stopped listening to each other and I fear we are all leaning toward fascist thinking. We should be using this medium to help us adapt to our new, interactive lives. This is how we become relevant.
essay  feminism  society  culture  games  gaming  life  art 
november 2016 by jm
Tarkovsky Films Free Online
Ivan's Childhood, Andrei Rublev, Solaris, The Mirror, and Stalker -- all viewable for free on YouTube thanks to Mosfilm. quality not great though....
film  movies  art  video  youtube  mosfilm  tarkovsky 
november 2016 by jm
Stealth Cell Tower
'an antagonistic GSM base station [disguised] in the form of an innocuous office printer. It brings the covert design practice of disguising cellular infrastructure as other things - like trees and lamp-posts - indoors, while mimicking technology used by police and intelligence agencies to surveil mobile phone users.'
gsm  hardware  art  privacy  surveillance  hacks  printers  mobile-phones 
november 2016 by jm
ArquitecturB
amazing architectural-oddities Tumblr (via Present and Correct)
tumblr  art  photography  architecture  weird  odd 
october 2016 by jm
The more I clean... - mlkshk
"Here," by Richard McGuire. Amazing piece of comic art from 1989
richard-mcguire  art  comics  graphic-novels  history  time 
june 2016 by jm
brixsystem
This conceptual collection consists of eight 6:1 scale versions of classic LEGO bricks, each fully functional in one way or the other. Including eight matching photo montages, a homage to the box cover art for the classic "Legoland Space" line. Hultén - "Like most people, I was raised by Lego. For this project, I chose to work with a set of decorated bricks from the iconic 79-87 "Legoland Space" line. These were bricks that would trigger my imagination as a child. 25 years have passed, and they still trigger"


ERMAHGERD (faints)
space-lego  lego  cool  art  bricks  wood  devices  want 
may 2016 by jm
There’s Something Fishy About The Other Nefertiti
The last possibility and reigning theory is that Ms. Badri and Mr. Nelles elusive hacker partners are literally real hackers who stole a copy of the high resolution scan from the Museum’s servers. A high resolution scan must exist as a high res 3D printed replica is already available for sale online. Museum officials have dismissed the Other Nefertiti model as “of minor quality”, but that’s not what we are seeing in this highly detailed scan. Perhaps the file was obtained from someone involved in printing the reproduction, or it was a scan made of the reproduction? Indeed, the common belief in online 3D Printing community chatter is that the Kinect “story” is a fabrication to hide the fact that the model was actually stolen data from a commercial high quality scan. If the artists were behind a server hack, the legal ramifications for them are much more serious than scanning the object, which has few, if any legal precedents.
art  history  3d-printing  3d  nefertiti  heists  copyright  data  kinect 
march 2016 by jm
Roads to Rome
'At least for Europe it is obvious: All roads lead to Rome! You can reach the eternal city on almost 500.000 routes from all across the continent. Which road would you take?
To approach one of the biggest unsolved quests of mobility, the first question we asked ourselves was: Where do you start, when you want to know every road to Rome? We aligned starting points in a 26.503.452 km² grid covering all of Europe. Every cell of this grid contains the starting point to one of our journeys to Rome.
Now that we have our 486.713 starting points we need to find out how we could reach Rome as our destination. For this we created a algorithm that calculates one route for every trip. The more often a single street segment is used, the stronger it is drawn on the map. The maps as outcome of this project is somewhere between information visualization and data art, unveiling mobility and a very large scale.'

Beautiful! Decent-sized prints available for 26 euros too.
to-get  tobuy  rome  mapping  data  maps  europe  art 
december 2015 by jm
Accretion Disc Series - Clint Fulkerson
available as prints -- vector art with a hint of the bacterial
algorithms  art  graphics  vector  bacteria  petri-dish  clint-fulkerson 
november 2015 by jm
Gallery - Steffen Dam
Danish glassware artist making wonderful Wunderkammers -- cabinets of curiosities --- entirely from glass. Seeing as one of his works sold for UKP50,000 last year, I suspect these are a bit out of my league, sadly
art  glassware  steffen-dam  wunderkammers  museums 
november 2015 by jm
Michael Kagan | Prints
'Heavily tinted blue paintings form space stations, spacesuits, and rockets just after blast. Michael Kagan paints these large-scale works to celebrate the man-made object—machinery that both protects and holds the possibility of instantly killing those that operate the equipment from the inside. To paint the large works, Kagan utilizes an impasto technique with thick strokes that are deliberate and unique, showing an aggression in his application of oil paint on linen. The New York-based artist focuses on iconic images in his practice, switching back and forth between abstract and representational styles. “The painting is finished when it can fall apart and come back together depending on how it is read and the closeness to the work,” said Kagan about his work. “Each painting is an image, a snapshot, a flash moment, a quick read that is locked into memory by the iconic silhouettes.”'

Via http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2015/08/michael-kagens-space-paintings/
paintings  prints  art  michael-kagan  space  abstract-art  tobuy 
september 2015 by jm
Why Google's Deep Dream Is Future Kitsch
Deep Dream estranges us from our fears, perhaps, but it doesn't make them go away. It's easy to discuss Deep Dream as an independent creature, a foreign intelligence that we interact with for fun. Yet like all kitsch, it comes straight back to its creators.
kitsch  deep-dream  art  graphics  google  inceptionism 
july 2015 by jm
jwz on Inceptionism
"Shoggoth ovipositors":
So then they reach inside to one of the layers and spin the knob randomly to fuck it up. Lower layers are edges and curves. Higher layers are faces, eyes and shoggoth ovipositors. [....] But the best part is not when they just glitch an image -- which is a fun kind of embossing at one end, and the "extra eyes" filter at the other -- but is when they take a net trained on some particular set of objects and feed it static, then zoom in, and feed the output back in repeatedly. That's when you converge upon the platonic ideal of those objects, which -- it turns out -- tend to be Giger nightmare landscapes. Who knew. (I knew.)


This stuff is still boggling my mind. All those doggy faces! That is one dog-obsessed ANN.
neural-networks  ai  jwz  funny  shoggoths  image-recognition  hr-giger  art  inceptionism 
june 2015 by jm
Inceptionism: Going Deeper into Neural Networks
This is amazing, and a little scary.
If we choose higher-level layers, which identify more sophisticated features in images, complex features or even whole objects tend to emerge. Again, we just start with an existing image and give it to our neural net. We ask the network: “Whatever you see there, I want more of it!” This creates a feedback loop: if a cloud looks a little bit like a bird, the network will make it look more like a bird. This in turn will make the network recognize the bird even more strongly on the next pass and so forth, until a highly detailed bird appears, seemingly out of nowhere.

An enlightening comment from the G+ thread:

This is the most fun we've had in the office in a while. We've even made some of those 'Inceptionistic' art pieces into giant posters. Beyond the eye candy, there is actually something deeply interesting in this line of work: neural networks have a bad reputation for being strange black boxes that that are opaque to inspection. I have never understood those charges: any other model (GMM, SVM, Random Forests) of any sufficient complexity for a real task is completely opaque for very fundamental reasons: their non-linear structure makes it hard to project back the function they represent into their input space and make sense of it. Not so with backprop, as this blog post shows eloquently: you can query the model and ask what it believes it is seeing or 'wants' to see simply by following gradients. This 'guided hallucination' technique is very powerful and the gorgeous visualizations it generates are very evocative of what's really going on in the network.
art  machine-learning  algorithm  inceptionism  research  google  neural-networks  learning  dreams  feedback  graphics 
june 2015 by jm
Cover Story: “Playdate” - The New Yorker
the story behind Chris Ware's lovely Minecraft New Yorker cover
minecraft  chris-ware  art  kids  play  gaming  games 
june 2015 by jm
The Colossal Shop
ThisIsColossal now have a shop! bookmarking for some lovely gifts
art  design  shop  colossal  shopping  christmas  gifts 
april 2015 by jm
CGA in 1024 Colors - a New Mode: the Illustrated Guide
awesome hackery. brings me back to my C=64 demo days
pc  cga  graphics  hacks  art  1024-colours 
april 2015 by jm
Sheets of Glass Cut into Layered Ocean Waves by Ben Young
I particularly love "Rough Waters" -- amazing stuff from this kiwi artist
sculpture  art  water  waves  sea  glass  ben-young 
april 2015 by jm
The Algorists
<pre>if (creation && object of art && algorithm && one's own algorithm) {
include * an algorist *
} elseif (!creation || !object of art || !algorithm || !one's own algorithm) {
exclude * not an algorist *
}</pre>
algorism  algorithm  art  algorists  via:belongio 
march 2015 by jm
Papa’s Maze 2.0: a father’s beautifully intricate puzzle for his daughter
Working in a similar fashion – drawing small portions each day – it took Mr. Nomura about 2 months to complete his new maze. And in our humble opinion, we think it’s actually just as beautiful, if not more. It’s not quite as dense and the crisper lines make it easier to perceive the interesting patterns that the maze forms. It’s stunning in graphic quality but it’s also a functioning solvable maze, just like its predecessor. Say hello to Papa’s Maze 2.0. It’s available as a print for $30.
papas-maze  mazes  prints  art  japan  puzzles 
march 2015 by jm
ASCIIFlow
Excellent web-based ASCII-art editor (via Craig)
via:craig  design  ascii  diagrams  editor  ascii-art  art  asciiflow  drawing 
march 2015 by jm
Monodraw
nice, free-during-beta Mac app to draw ASCII-art diagrams
art  ascii  mac  apps  monodraw 
march 2015 by jm
Swiss Authorities Arrest Bot for Buying Drugs and Fake Passport
A bot created by a group of artists spent the last few months selecting items at random from a Silk Road-style darknet marketplace, buying them with Bitcoin, and having them shipped to a gallery in Switzerland. After the it bought some ecstasy pills and a counterfeit passport, we asked: How will authorities deal with the complex legal and moral issue of a piece of artificial intelligence breaking the law? It turns out, the answer was simple: just arrest the computer.
drugs  darknet  bitcoin  ecstasy  art  bots  law-enforcement  switzerland 
january 2015 by jm
the "Unknown Pleasures" cover, emulated in Mathematica
In July 1967, astronomers at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, observed an unidentified radio signal from interstellar space, which flashed periodically every 1.33730 seconds. This object flashed with such regularity that it was accurate enough to be used as a clock and only be off by one part in a hundred million.

It was eventually determined that this was the first discovery of a pulsar, CP-1919.  This is an object that has about the same mass as the Sun, but is the size of the San Francisco Bay at its widest (~20 kilometers) that is rotating so fast that its emitting a beam of light towards Earth like a strobing light house! Pulsars are neutron stars that are formed from the remnants of a massive star when it experiences stellar death.

A hand drawn graph plotted in the style of a waterfall plot, in the Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy, later became renown for its use on the cover of the album "Unknown Pleasures"  by 1970s English band Joy Division.


The entire blog at http://intothecontinuum.tumblr.com/ is pretty great. Lots of nice mathematical animated GIFs, accompanied by Mathematica source and related ponderings.
maths  gifs  animation  art  unknown-pleasures  mathematica  cp-1919  pulsars  astronomy  joy-division  waterfall-plots  cambridge  blogs 
december 2014 by jm
Lost avant-garde painting found in Stuart Little’s living room
Two years later, he heard from Lisa S., an assistant set designer on [the movie] Stuart Little. She had bought the painting for $500 from an antiques store in Pasadena specifically for the movie because she thought its cool elegance was perfectly suited for the Little’s New York City apartment. Lisa S. had tracked it down in another warehouse and purchased it from Sony just because she liked it so much. When she contacted Barki, she had no idea of the history of the painting hanging on her bedroom wall.

After Barki visited the painting in person and confirmed its identity, Lisa sold it to a private collector. That collector has now been persuaded to sell it in Hungary. It will go up for auction at the Virag Judit Art Gallery in Budapest on December 13th with a starting price of 110,000 euros ($160,000). Gergely Barki won’t make a dime off of his discovery, but he will have a great story to tell in his biography of the artist.
stuart-little  art  history  hungary  pasadena  movies  set-design  antiques  robert-bereny  post-impressionism 
december 2014 by jm
This Canadian Artist Halted Pipeline Development by Copyrighting His Land as a Work of Art
One of the really important pieces on my land was this white-picket fence. The picket fence is probably 100 yards or less, within 100 yards of where they wanted to build this pipeline. I [plan to] extend it 8 feet every year for the rest of my life and I've been doing that for 25 years. It got me thinking, where does this piece end? Does it end at the actual structure of the fence or the things growing around it, growing through it, that are part of the photography, the documentation of it? I realized at that point that [the fence], and the other sculptures and pieces and incursions and conceptual works, were actually integral to that piece of land and to my practice.

I had not intended for it to be a political piece, it was just a piece, an idea the follow-through of which at some point became poetic, you go, "Wait a minute the fence actually stopped them!" But the fence doesn't actually enclose anything. It's just a straight line. And it's marking something that's actually unmarkable, which is time. And one day it'll be gone, as will I. The land will be changed--but it was just this crazy irony that kicked into play when I was standing there with those oil negotiators.
copyright  art  pipelines  canada  politics  oil  land  conceptual-art  ip 
november 2014 by jm
Bay Point print by Grant Haffner
$50 print (plus shipping of course), 16" x 16"
prints  like  road  driving  abstract  art  grant-haffner 
october 2014 by jm
"Meta-Perceptual Helmets For The Dead Zoo"
with Neil McKenzie, Nov 9-16 2014, in the National History Museum in Dublin:

'These six helmets/viewing devices start off by exploring physical conditions of viewing: if we have two eyes, they why is our vision so limited? Why do we have so little perception of depth? Why don’t our two eyes offer us two different, complementary views of the world around us? Why can’t they extend from our body so we can see over or around things? Why don’t they allow us to look behind and in front at the same time, or sideways in both directions? Why can’t our two eyes simultaneously focus on two different tasks?

Looking through Michael Land’s defining work Animal Eyes, we see that nature has indeed explored all of these possibilities: a Hammerhead Shark has hyper-stereo vision; a horse sees 350° around itself; a chameleon has separately rotatable eyes…

The series of Meta-Perceptual Helmets do indeed explore these zoological typologies: proposing to humans the hyper-stereo vision of the hammerhead shark; or the wide peripheral vision of the horse; or the backward/forward vision of the chameleon… but they also take us into the unnatural world of mythology and literature: the Cheshire Cat Helmet is so called because of the strange lingering effect of dominating visual information such as a smile or the eyes; the Cyclops allows one large central eye to take in the world around while a second tiny hidden eye focuses on a close up task (why has the creature never evolved that can focus on denitting without constantly having to glance around?).'

(via Emma)
perception  helmets  dublin  ireland  museums  dead-zoo  sharks  eyes  vision  art 
october 2014 by jm
Moominvalley Map Print | Magic Pony
Lovely print! Shipping would be a bit crazy, though. There has to be an english-language print of one of Tove Jansson's maps on sale somewhere in Europe...
prints  moomins  moominvalley  maps  hattifatteners  magic-pony  tove-jannson  art 
july 2014 by jm
This tree produces 40 different types of fruit
An art professor from Syracuse University in the US, Van Aken grew up on a family farm before pursuing a career as an artist, and has combined his knowledge of the two to develop his incredible Tree of 40 Fruit. 
In 2008, Van Aken learned that an orchard at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station was about to be shut down due to a lack of funding. This single orchard grew a great number of heirloom, antique, and native varieties of stone fruit, and some of these were 150 to 200 years old. To lose this orchard would render many of these rare and old varieties of fruit extinct, so to preserve them, Van Aken bought the orchard, and spent the following years figuring out how to graft parts of the trees onto a single fruit tree. [...]
Aken’s Tree of 40 Fruit looks like a normal tree for most of the year, but in spring it reveals a stunning patchwork of pink, white, red and purple blossoms, which turn into an array of plums, peaches, apricots, nectarines, cherries and almonds during the summer months, all of which are rare and unique varieties. 
fruit  art  amazing  food  agriculture  grafting  orchards  sam-van-aken  farming 
july 2014 by jm
A Japanese Artist Launches Plants Into Space
This is amazing.
though the vessel was found on the ground, the flowers were not.
japan  art  bonsai  flowers  space  nevada  black-rock-desert  exobiotanica 
july 2014 by jm
Layered Glass Table Concept Creates a Cross-Section of the Ocean
beautiful stuff -- and a snip at only UKP 5,800 ex VAT. it'd make a good DIY project though ;)
art  tables  glass  layering  3d  cross-sections  water  ocean  sea  mapping  cartography  layers  this-is-colossal  design  furniture 
july 2014 by jm
Julie Moon | Magic Pony
some cute brooches/jewellery here, for the next time I need to pick a nice gift
julie-moon  art  magic-pony  jewellery  brooches  gifts 
may 2014 by jm
Papa's Maze | spoon & tamago
While going through her papa's old belongings, a young girl discovered something incredible - a mind-bogglingly intricate maze that her father had drawn by hand 30 years ago. While working as a school janitor it had taken him 7 years to produce the piece, only for it to be forgotten about... until now.


34" x 24" print, $40
mazes  art  prints  weird  papas-maze  japan 
march 2014 by jm
Desert Breath
'A Monumental Land Art Installation in the Sahara Desert', by the D.A.S.T. Arteam in 1997. More correctly, near the Red Sea resort of El Gouna -- so possible to visit!
el-gouna  sahara  deserts  land-art  art  via:colossal  desert-breath  spirals 
february 2014 by jm
British Library uploads one million public domain images to the net for remix and reuse - Boing Boing
this is excellent!
The British Library has uploaded one million public domain scans from 17th-19th century books to Flickr! They're embarking on an ambitious programme to crowdsource novel uses and navigation tools for the huge corpus. Already, the manifest of image descriptions is available through Github. This is a remarkable, public spirited, archival project, and the British Library is to be loudly applauded for it!
british-library  libraries  public-domain  art  graphics  images  history  19th-century  17th-century  18th-century  books  crowdsourcing  via:boingboing  github 
december 2013 by jm
ReCreate Ireland - Creativity through Reuse
Great idea.
For creative groups, we aim to offer easy access to a rich and varied selection of textures, colours and shapes. Members are also be able to participate in creativity workshops facilitated by fully trained professional artists either in-house or on your own premises. We intend to be the first choice of teachers, early childhood educators and arts animators in the community.

For businesses, ReCreate reduces the costs of moving on end-of-line materials. We are a professional, credible and reliable partner organisation and our aim is to divert approximately 115 metric tonnes of clean materials from landfill annually. All collections are free of charge.
recreate  diy  make-and-do  recycling  landfill  art  play  scrap 
november 2013 by jm
WISH: A Monumental 11-Acre Portrait in Belfast by Jorge Rodríguez-Gerada
Must go up and visit this.
Unveiled several days ago in Belfast, Northern Ireland as part of the Belfast Festival, WISH is the latest public art project by Cuban-American artist Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada. The image depicted is of an anonymous Belfast girl and is so large it can only be viewed from the highest points in Belfast or an airplane. Several years in the making, WISH was first plotted on a grid using state-of-the-art Topcon GPS technology and 30,000 manually placed wooden stakes in Belfast’s Titanic Quarter. The portrait was then “drawn” with aid of volunteers who helped place nearly 8 million pounds of natural materials including soil, sand, and rock over a period of four weeks.
belfast  ireland  art  portraits  jorge-rodriguez-gerada  land  soil 
october 2013 by jm
Kovet
some great phone cases from an Irish company, with nifty art by Irish illustrators and artists including Fatti Burke and Chris Judge
chris-judge  fatti-burke  illustrators  art  ireland  iphone  cases 
october 2013 by jm
Codex Seraphinianus: A new edition of the strangest book in the world
Excited! one commenter claims a paperback of the new edition of Luigi Serafini's masterwork should cost about $75 when it comes out in a couple of months. sign me up, this is an amazing work
codex-seraphinianus  art  weird  strange  books  luigi-serafini 
october 2013 by jm
Big data is watching you
Some great street art from Brighton, via Darach Ennis
via:darachennis  street-art  graffiti  big-data  snooping  spies  gchq  nsa  art 
september 2013 by jm
Time is a Dimension
I love these.
Photographic prints are great because they don’t need power to be displayed. They are more or less permanent. Videos are great because they record a sequence of time which shows reality almost like how we experience. Is it possible to combine the two? And not via long exposure photography where often details are lost from motion.

So I played around with the tools of digital photography and post processing to give you this series: Time is a dimension. This series of images are mostly landscapes, seascapes and cityscapes, and they are a single composite made from sequences that span 2-4 hours, mostly of sunrises and sunsets.

The basic structure of a landscape is present in every piece. But each panel or concentric layer shows a different slice of time, which is related to the adjacent panel/layer. The transition from daytime to night is gradual and noticeable in every piece, but would not be something you expect to see in a still image.
photography  beautiful  photos  art  time  dimensions  prints  via:matthaughey 
september 2013 by jm
From derelict to delightful: Art Tunnel Smithfield
I do like the Art Tunnel. Smithfield is a great demo of reclaiming Dublin's increasing dereliction and I hope the DCC allow this to continue
smithfield  d7  dublin  ireland  art  art-tunnel  reclamation  derelict  economy  dcc 
august 2013 by jm
The Getty Museum offers a huge chunk of their collection for free use
We’ve launched the Open Content Program to share, freely and without restriction, as many of the Getty’s digital resources as possible. The initial focus of the Open Content Program is to make available all images of public domain artworks in the Getty’s collections. Today we’ve taken a first step toward this goal by making roughly 4,600 high-resolution images of the Museum’s collection free to use, modify, and publish for any purpose.

Why open content? Why now? The Getty was founded on the conviction that understanding art makes the world a better place, and sharing our digital resources is the natural extension of that belief. This move is also an educational imperative. Artists, students, teachers, writers, and countless others rely on artwork images to learn, tell stories, exchange ideas, and feed their own creativity. In its discussion of open content, the most recent Horizon Report, Museum Edition stated that “it is now the mark—and social responsibility—of world-class institutions to develop and share free cultural and educational resources.” I agree wholeheartedly.
getty  art  via:tupp_ed  open-content  free  images  pictures  paintings  museums 
august 2013 by jm
Content Aware Typography
Photoshop's "Content Aware Fill" applied to text. some very cool results
images  cool  art  typography  algorithms  via:pentadact  photoshop 
july 2013 by jm
Atelier olschinsky - "Cities III 05"
Fine Art Print on Hahnemuehle Photo Rag Bright White, 310g: 40x50cm up to 70x100cm. Some great art based on decayed urban landscape shots, from a Vienna-based design studio. See also http://english.mashkulture.net/2011/10/17/atelier-olschinsky-cities-iii/ , http://www.mascontext.com/tag/atelier-olschinsky/
olschinsky  cities  urban  decay  landscape  art  prints  want 
june 2013 by jm
Cities 05
from Atelier Olschinsky. 'Fine Art Print on Hahnemuehle Photo Rag Bright White 310g; Limited Edition / Numbered and signed by the artist'
art  graphics  cities  prints  want  via:bdif 
june 2013 by jm
Instant artist statement: Arty Bollocks Generator
'My work explores the relationship between the body and vegetarian ethics.
With influences as diverse as Munch and Francis Bacon, new synergies are created from both orderly and random narratives.
Ever since I was a postgraduate I have been fascinated by the essential unreality of the moment. What starts out as undefined soon becomes corroded into a hegemony of greed, leaving only a sense of failing and the chance of a new order.
As temporal replicas become transformed through diligent and undefined practice, the viewer is left with an impression of the darkness of our culture.'
funny  humor  art  arty  bollocks  generator  hacks  via:leroideplywood 
may 2013 by jm
Protect your designs
A good writeup of how to detect cases of copyright infringement for photography, art and other visual media.
Von Glitschka, Modern Dog and myriad others make clear that the support of the creative community is absolutely vital in raising awareness of copyright infringements. Sites like www.youthoughtwewouldntnotice.com name and shame clear breaches of copyright, while the Modern Dog case shows that there is no better IP tracing system than the eyes and ears of the design community itself. “It’s the industry at large that has kept me aware of infringements,” states Von. “Without that I would miss most of them because I don’t go looking – they find me via the eyes of others.”
photography  art  visual-media  copyright  infringement  piracy  ripping 
april 2013 by jm
Edition - Irish Design
'Edition has a ‘design for life’ philosophy - we think that unique designer-made items can be a part of our everyday lives without costing the earth. We stock affordable, contemporary and functional products (mostly handmade), including jewellery, home-ware, accessories, art and toys. Every item has been carefully selected and are all designed here in Ireland.'
edition  design  ireland  art  graphics  jewellery  toys 
march 2013 by jm
Fund it :: The Joinery
Stoneybatter's not-for-profit art space needs contributions
art  stoneybatter  dublin  d7  ireland  fundit  fundraising  the-joinery 
february 2013 by jm
Werner Knaupp - Acrylbilder
my favourite art of the moment. Thick, heavy layers of acrylic black and white paint, evoking the stormy Atlantic (brr). Gallery Bode, which showed this in Nuremberg in 2011, wrote the following at http://www.bode-galerie.de/en/exhibitions/schwarz_weiss :

Gallery Bode is pleased to constitute the cooperation with Werner Knaupp with an exhibition of a new workseries. The exhibition showcases artworks out of the series "Westmen Isles". [...]

The journeys to Iceland are a background to the development of this new workseries.
These paintings are telling of a forbidding nature. The beholder can't take a [safe] position but he is involved into the event which becomes comprehensible in a nearly physical way. These pictures of a overwhelming nature could be traced back to Knaupp's confrontation with the force of nature while his journeys. The experience of this force pushes the limits of human being and evokes primal fear.
With the abdication of colours the artworks reach dynamic. This foots on the consistency of colour and on the changing between reality and abstraction.

In an art historical view the new black and white paintings detached themselves from traditional landscape painting. Werner Knaupp implements the pure force of nature into pure painting, to visualise the force fields of nature. The beholder experiences with these artworks a nature without human dimension. In Werner Knaupp's Oeuvre the "Westmen Isles" paintings are a new expression of his examination with existential fundamental questions.
germany  art  painting  werner-knaupp  paintings  monochrome  sea  iceland 
february 2013 by jm
Dublin Free WiFi Icons
some lovely pixel art to advertise the free wifi areas, by Craig Robinson. I see a girl in pyjamas, a Dub hurler, a viking, Molly Malone, Phil Lynott, Oscar Wilde, a Moore St market trader, a busker, and the Spire...
pixel-art  dublin  ireland  art  craig-robinson  icons 
january 2013 by jm
Namazu-e: Earthquake catfish prints
'In November 1855, the Great Ansei Earthquake struck the city of Edo (now Tokyo), claiming 7,000 lives and inflicting widespread damage. Within days, a new type of color woodblock print known as namazu-e (lit. "catfish pictures") became popular among the residents of the shaken city. These prints featured depictions of mythical giant catfish (namazu) who, according to popular legend, caused earthquakes by thrashing about in their underground lairs. In addition to providing humor and social commentary, many prints claimed to offer protection from future earthquakes.'
japan  art  namazu-e  ukiyo-e  catfish  earthquakes  myth 
january 2013 by jm
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