jm + archives   6

Silicon Valley Can't Be Trusted With Our History
the internet is messing with human cognition in ways that will take decades to fully understand. Some researchers believe it is altering the way we create memories. In one study, researchers told a group of people to copy a list of facts onto a computer. They told half the group that the facts would be saved when they finished and the other half that the facts would be erased. Those who thought that the facts would be saved were much worse at remembering them afterward. Instead of relying on our friends and neighbors — or on books, for that matter — we have started outsourcing our memories to the internet.

So what happens if those memories are erased — and if the very platforms responsible for their storage are the ones doing the erasing? That scenario is a threat everywhere, but particularly in countries where the authorities are most aggressively controlling speech and editing history. We say the internet never forgets, but internet freedom isn’t evenly distributed: When tech companies have expanded into parts of the world where information suppression is the norm, they have proven willing to work with local censors.
Those censors will be emboldened by new efforts at platform regulation in the US and Europe, just as authoritarian regimes have already enthusiastically repurposed the rhetoric of “fake news.”

The reach and power of tech platforms such as Facebook and Twitter are so new and strange that we’ve barely begun formulating a response. But we can learn from the activists already doing it; from Mosireen, or the team behind the Syrian Archive — six people, with a budget of $96,000, who are preserving thousands of hours of footage from their country’s civil war. The archive recently published the Chemical Weapons Database, documenting 221 chemical weapons attacks with 861 verified videos, implicating the Assad regime in a pattern of war crimes and putting the lie to armchair investigators helping to propagate conspiracy theories in the West. One of its cofounders recently told the Intercept that he spends nearly all his time making sure videos aren’t deleted from the big tech platforms before he gets a chance to download them.
censorship  syria  chemical-weapons  assad  history  youtube  video  archival  mosireen  the-syrian-archive  archives  memory  facebook 
27 days ago by jm
ISIS vs. 3D Printing | Motherboard
Morehshin Allahyari, an Iranian born artist, educator, and activist [....] is working on digitally fabricating [the] sculptures [ISIS destroyed] for a series called “Material Speculation” as part of a residency in Autodesk's Pier 9 program. The first in the series is “Material Speculation: ISIS,” which, through intense research, is modeling and reproducing statues destroyed by ISIS in 2015. Allahyari isn't just interested in replicating lost objects but making it possible for anyone to do the same: Embedded within each semi-translucent copy is a flash drive with Allahyari’s research about the artifacts, and an online version is coming.

In this way, “Material Speculation: ISIS,” is not purely a metaphorical affront to ISIS, but a practical one as well. Allahyari’s work is similar to conservation efforts, including web-based Project Mosul, a small team and group of volunteers that are three-dimensionally modeling ISIS-destroyed artifacts based on crowd-sourced photographs.

"Thinking about 3D printers as poetic and practical tools for digital and physical archiving and documenting has been a concept that I've been interested in for the last three years,” Allahyari says. Once she began exploring the works, she discovered a thorough lack of documentation. Her research snowballed. “It became extremely important for me to think about ways to gather this information and save them for both current and future civilizations.”
3d-printing  fabrication  scanning  isis  niniveh  iraq  morehshin-allahyari  history  preservation  archives  archival 
may 2015 by jm
Make The Web Fast - The HAR Show: Capturing and Analyzing performance data with HTTP Archive format — Google Developers
Wow, I didn't know about this. Great idea.
Need a flexible format to record, export, and analyze network performance data? Well, that's exactly what the HTTP Archive format (HAR) is designed to do! Even better, did you know that Chrome DevTools supports it? In this episode we'll take a deep dive into the format (as you'll see, its very simple), and explore the many different ways it can help you capture and analyze your sites performance. Join Ilya Grigorik and Peter Lubbers to find out how to capture HAR network traces in Chrome, visualize the data via an online tool, share the reports with your clients and coworkers, automate the logging and capture of HAR data for your build scripts, and even adapt it to server-side analysis use cases
capturing  logging  performance  http  debugging  trace  capture  har  archives  protocols  recording 
december 2013 by jm
How You Can Help Save Upcoming.org, Posterous, and More
Yahoo! sucks. shutting down in days? ArchiveTeam Warrior to the rescue; install the VM!
archival  yahoo  shutdowns  upcoming  waxy  archives  virtualbox 
april 2013 by jm
Infovore » A Year of Links
'I thought it would be interesting to produce a kind of personal encylopedia: each volume cataloguing the links for a whole year. Given I first used Delicious in 2004, that makes for eight books to date.' Printed via Lulu, with a tag index. Really nifty ;)
books  archives  bookmarks  pinboard  delicious  links  personal  history  via:pinboard 
february 2012 by jm
gitPAN
CPAN and BackPAN, as a set of git repositories; essentially a read-only view of all CPAN releases, ever. good plan; I like the way git is useful as a kind of general-purpose distributed archive system
git  gitpan  cpan  backpan  perl  releases  archives  history  version-control  from delicious
june 2010 by jm

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