jm + antispam   6

Spammergate: The Fall of an Empire
Featuring this interesting reactive-block evasion tactic:
In that screenshot, a RCM co-conspirator describes a technique in which the spammer seeks to open as many connections as possible between themselves and a Gmail server. This is done by purposefully configuring your own machine to send response packets extremely slowly, and in a fragmented manner, while constantly requesting more connections.
Then, when the Gmail server is almost ready to give up and drop all connections, the spammer suddenly sends as many emails as possible through the pile of connection tunnels. The receiving side is then overwhelmed with data and will quickly block the sender, but not before processing a large load of emails.


(via Tony Finch)
via:fanf  spam  antispam  gmail  blocklists  packets  tcp  networking 
11 weeks ago by jm
Crowdsourcing isn’t broken — Backchannel — Medium
'A great compendium by @harper of techniques for handling trolls and griefers in online communities', via kragen
via:kragen  antispam  filtering  trolls  community  crowdsourcing  threadless  harper  griefers  abuse  tips 
february 2015 by jm
SpamAssassin 3.4.0 released
Good to see the guys cracking on without me ;)

'2014-02-11: SpamAssassin 3.4.0 has been released adding native support for IPv6, improved DNS Blocklist technology and support for massively-scalable Bayesian filtering using the Redis backend.'
antispam  open-source  spamassassin  apache 
february 2014 by jm
Authentication is machine learning
This may be the most insightful writing about authentication in years:
<p>
From my brief time at Google, my internship at Yahoo!, and conversations with other companies doing web authentication at scale, I’ve observed that as authentication systems develop they gradually merge with other abuse-fighting systems dealing with various forms of spam (email, account creation, link, etc.) and phishing. Authentication eventually loses its binary nature and becomes a fuzzy classification problem.</p><p>This is not a new observation. It’s generally accepted for banking authentication and some researchers like Dinei Florêncio and Cormac Herley have made it for web passwords. Still, much of the security research community thinks of password authentication in a binary way [..]. Spam and phishing provide insightful examples: technical solutions (like Hashcash, DKIM signing, or EV certificates), have generally failed but in practice machine learning has greatly reduced these problems. The theory has largely held up that with enough data we can train reasonably effective classifiers to solve seemingly intractable problems.
</p>


(via Tony Finch.)
passwords  authentication  big-data  machine-learning  google  abuse  antispam  dkim  via:fanf 
december 2012 by jm
CloudBurst
'Highly Sensitive Short Read Mapping with MapReduce'. current state of the art in DNA sequence read-mapping algorithms.
CloudBurst uses well-known seed-and-extend algorithms to map reads to a reference genome. It can map reads with any number of differences or mismatches. [..] Given an exact seed, CloudBurst attempts to extend the alignment into an end-to-end alignment with at most k mismatches or differences by either counting mismatches of the two sequences, or with a dynamic programming algorithm to allow for gaps. CloudBurst uses [Hadoop] to catalog and extend the seeds. In the map phase, the map function emits all length-s k-mers from the reference sequences, and all non-overlapping length-s kmers from the reads. In the shuffle phase, read and reference kmers are brought together. In the reduce phase, the seeds are extended into end-to-end alignments. The power of MapReduce and CloudBurst is the map and reduce functions run in parallel over dozens or hundreds of processors.

JM_SOUGHT -- the next generation ;)
bioinformatics  mapreduce  hadoop  read-alignment  dna  sequencing  sought  antispam  algorithms 
july 2012 by jm
Syria Bars Text Messages With Irish-Made Gear - Bloomberg
Anti-spam/AV filtering technology turned to a different purpose: political repression. 'The next day, 225 instructed Syriatel to block messages containing the word “massacres.”'
antispam  ireland  repression  technology  syria  politics  cellusys  adaptivemobile 
february 2012 by jm

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