jm + anonymity   11

Cloudflare on Tor
quite a reasonable position, I think
tor  cloudflare  abuse  anonymity  captchas 
march 2016 by jm
Care.data and access to UK health records: patient privacy and public trust
'In 2013, the United Kingdom launched care.data, an NHS England initiative to combine patient records, stored in the machines of general practitioners (GPs), with information from social services and hospitals to make one centralized data archive. One aim of the initiative is to gain a picture of the care being delivered between different parts of the healthcare system and thus identify what is working in health care delivery, and what areas need greater attention and resources. This case study analyzes the complications around the launch of care.data. It explains the historical context of the program and the controversies that emerged in the course of the rollout. It explores problems in management and communications around the centralization effort, competing views on the safety of “anonymous” and “pseudonymous” health data, and the conflicting legal duties imposed on GPs with the introduction of the 2012 Health and Social Care Act. This paper also explores the power struggles in the battle over care.data and outlines the tensions among various stakeholders, including patients, GPs, the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC), the government, privacy experts and data purchasers. The predominant public policy question that emerges from this review centers on how best to utilize technological advances and simultaneously strike a balance between the many competing interests around health and personal privacy.'
care.data  privacy  healthcare  uk  nhs  trust  anonymity  anonymization  gps  medicine 
august 2015 by jm
Bank of the Underworld - The Atlantic
Prosecutors analyzed approximately 500 of Liberty Reserve’s biggest accounts, which constituted 44 percent of its business. The government contends that 32 of these accounts were connected to the sale of stolen credit cards and 117 were used by Ponzi-scheme operators. All of this activity flourished, prosecutors said, because Liberty Reserve made no real effort to monitor its users for criminal behavior. What’s more, records showed that one of the company’s top tech experts, Mark Marmilev, who was also arrested, appeared to have promoted Liberty Reserve in chat rooms devoted to Ponzi schemes.


(via Nelson)
scams  fraud  crime  currency  the-atlantic  liberty-reserve  ponzi-schemes  costa-rica  arthur-budovsky  banking  anonymity  cryptocurrency  money-laundering  carding 
april 2015 by jm
Warning: Do NOT use my mirrors services until I have reviewed the situation
Things hotting up in TOR-land.
Until I have had the time and information available to review the
situation, I am strongly recommending my mirrors are not used under
any circumstances. If they come back online without a PGP signed
message from myself to further explain the situation, exercise extreme
caution and treat even any items delivered over TLS to be potentially
hostile.
tor  privacy  crackdown  anonymity  seizures  crypto  via:hn 
december 2014 by jm
The FBI Used the Web's Favorite Hacking Tool to Unmask Tor Users | WIRED
Since Operation Torpedo [use of a Metasploit side project], there’s evidence the FBI’s anti-Tor capabilities have been rapidly advancing. Torpedo was in November 2012. In late July 2013, computer security experts detected a similar attack through Dark Net websites hosted by a shady ISP called Freedom Hosting—court records have since confirmed it was another FBI operation. For this one, the bureau used custom attack code that exploited a relatively fresh Firefox vulnerability—the hacking equivalent of moving from a bow-and-arrow to a 9-mm pistol. In addition to the IP address, which identifies a household, this code collected the MAC address of the particular computer that infected by the malware.

“In the course of nine months they went from off the shelf Flash techniques that simply took advantage of the lack of proxy protection, to custom-built browser exploits,” says Soghoian. “That’s a pretty amazing growth … The arms race is going to get really nasty, really fast.”
fbi  tor  police  flash  security  privacy  anonymity  darknet  wired  via:bruces 
december 2014 by jm
The Double Identity of an "Anti-Semitic" Commenter
Hasbara out of control. This is utterly nuts.
His intricate campaign, which he has admitted to Common Dreams, included posting comments by a screen name, "JewishProgressive," whose purpose was to draw attention to and denounce the anti-Semitic comments that he had written under many other screen names. The deception was many-layered. At one point he had one of his characters charge that the anti-Semitic comments and the criticism of the anti-Semitic comments must be written by "internet trolls who have been known to impersonate anti-Semites in order to then double-back and accuse others of supporting anti-Semitism"--exactly what he was doing.
hasbara  israel  trolls  propaganda  web  racism  comments  anonymity  commondreams 
august 2014 by jm
How The Copyright Industry Pushed For Internet Surveillance | TorrentFreak
Rick Falkvinge with a good point:
The reason for the copyright industry to push for surveillance is simple: any digital communications channel can be used for private conversation, but it can also be used to share culture and knowledge that is under copyright monopoly. In order to tell which communications is which, you must sort all of it – and to do that, you must look at all of it. In other words, if enforcing the copyright monopoly is your priority, you need to kill privacy, and specifically anonymity and secrecy of correspondence.


This was exactly my biggest worry -- a side-effect of effective copyright filtering is the creation of infrastructure for online oppression by the state.
copyright  privacy  state  data-protection  rick-falkvinge  copyfight  internet  filtering  surveillance  anonymity 
july 2013 by jm
Indymedia: It’s time to move on
Our decision to curtail publishing on the Nottingham Indymedia site and call a meeting is an attempt to create a space for new ideas. We are not interested in continuing along the slow but certain path to total irrelevance but want to draw in new people and start off in new directions whilst remaining faithful to the underlying principles of Indymedia.
indymedia  community  communication  web  anonymity  publishing  left-wing 
february 2013 by jm
Surprisingly Good Evidence That Real Name Policies Fail To Improve Comments
'Enough theorizing, there’s actually good evidence to inform the debate. For 4 years, Koreans enacted increasingly stiff real-name commenting laws, first for political websites in 2003, then for all websites receiving more than 300,000 viewers in 2007, and was finally tightened to 100,000 viewers a year later after online slander was cited in the suicide of a national figure. The policy, however, was ditched shortly after a Korean Communications Commission study found that it only decreased malicious comments by 0.9%. Korean sites were also inundated by hackers, presumably after valuable identities.

Further analysis by Carnegie Mellon’s Daegon Cho and Alessandro Acquisti, found that the policy actually increased the frequency of expletives in comments for some user demographics. While the policy reduced swearing and “anti-normative” behavior at the aggregate level by as much as 30%, individual users were not dismayed. “Light users”, who posted 1 or 2 comments, were most affected by the law, but “heavy” ones (11-16+ comments) didn’t seem to mind.

Given that the Commission estimates that only 13% of comments are malicious, a mere 30% reduction only seems to clean up the muddied waters of comment systems a depressingly negligent amount.

The finding isn’t surprising: social science researchers have long known that participants eventually begin to ignore cameras video taping their behavior. In other words, the presence of some phantom judgmental audience doesn’t seem to make us better versions of ourselves.'

(via Ronan Lyons)
anonymity  identity  policy  comments  privacy  politics  new-media  via:ronanlyons 
january 2013 by jm
Sting op exposes Andrews over FF Twitter rants - National News - Independent.ie
Incredible sting op uncovers the real identity of an anonymous Twitter account posting Fianna Fail gossip:
He discovered that each tweet had originated from the Twitter web interface, meaning it had been posted from a web browser on a computer, rather than sent from a mobile phone or other portable device.

Based on the times that tweets were posted by @brianformerff, he deduced that the Tweets were being posted while the user was on a work break, using a company computer or an internet cafe.

The next stage in the hunt was uncovering the IP address of the computer where the tweets originated.

"I created my own web redirection service which would allow me to take links to articles of interest, for example in the Irish Times, and then transform them into short links that would pass through a redirection server I controlled. In this way, if someone read the tweets and clicked on the link, I would be able to establish the IP address of the computer that was being used at the time."

The author created a new twitter account, @john_cant _type, based on the persona of a politics student based in Kildare. He started sending several messages and tweets to "brian" and other users to establish himself as a genuine twitter user.

Eventually @brianformerff responded to a post from @john_cant_type to a link to an article at Silicon Republic. The bait was taken and the IP address was tracked to an internet cafe, Amazon cyber/net Rathmines which offers web access "at the very reasonable rate of €1/hour".

What happened next descended almost into the realms of farce. The author waited for tweets from @brianformerff and then rushed to the internet cafe to try and catch Chris Andrews. Eventually the plan worked and the author used photography and video surveillance, even taking covert photographs of tweets as they were being posted in the internet cafe by Chris Andrews and analysing if the word count and structure matched the tweets appearing in cyberspace under the tag @brianformerff.
chris-andrews  twitter  surveillance  privacy  anonymity  politics  ireland  fianna-fail 
august 2012 by jm
why "anonymized" data really isn't
'Ohm notes, this illustrates a central reality of data collection: "data can either be useful or perfectly anonymous but never both."'
security  internet  politics  privacy  medicine  anonymity  datamining  anonymous  data  from delicious
september 2009 by jm

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