jm + amd   4

Completely Silent Computer
This computer makes no noise when it starts up.  It makes no noise when it shuts down.  It makes no noise when it idles.  It makes no noise when it’s under heavy load.  It makes no noise when it’s reading or writing data.  It can’t be heard in a regular room during the day.  It can’t be heard in a completely quiet house in the middle of the night.  It can’t be heard from 1m away.  It can’t be heard from 1cm away.  It can’t be heard — period.  It’s taken nearly 30 years to reach this point, but I’ve finally arrived.  The journey is over and it feels great.

If you are after a silent — not just quiet, but silent — daily driver, then I strongly recommend a passively-cooled case, heat pipes and solid state drives.  Eliminate the moving parts (e.g. fans, HDDs) and you eliminate the noise — it’s not that complicated.  It also doesn’t need to be really expensive (my system requirements were not ‘average’ so please don’t infer from this post that all DB4-based systems are as expensive).  Silence (and a perfectly respectable computer) can easily be had for half the price.
diy  hardware  pc  silence  quiet-hardware  cooling  fanless  amd 
8 weeks ago by jm
‘It Can’t Be True.’ Inside the Semiconductor Industry’s Meltdown
“Our first priority has been to have a complete mitigation in place,” said Intel’s Parker. “We’ve delivered a solution.” Some in the cybersecurity community aren’t so sure. Kocher, who helped discover Spectre, thinks this is just the beginning of the industry’s woes. Now that new ways to exploit chips have been exposed, there’ll be more variations and more flaws that will require more patches and mitigation.
"This is just like peeling the lid off the can of worms," he said.
meltdown  spectre  speculative-execution  security  exploits  intel  amd  cpus 
january 2018 by jm
Notes from the Intelpocalypse [LWN.net]
What emerges is a picture of unintended processor functionality that can be exploited to leak arbitrary information from the kernel, and perhaps from other guests in a virtualized setting. If these vulnerabilities are already known to some attackers, they could have been using them to attack cloud providers for some time now. It seems fair to say that this is one of the most severe vulnerabilities to surface in some time.

The fact that it is based in hardware makes things significantly worse. We will all be paying the performance penalties associated with working around these problems for the indefinite future. For the owners of vast numbers of systems that cannot be updated, the consequences will be worse: they will remain vulnerable to a set of vulnerabilities with known exploits. This is not a happy time for the computing industry.
hardware  cpus  intel  amd  spectre  meltdown  security 
january 2018 by jm
Nicole Perlroth's roundup on the Spectre and Meltdown security holes
Excellent roundup -- this really is amazingly bad news for CPU performance and fixability
meltdown  spectre  nicole-perlroth  security  cpu  performance  speculative-execution  intel  amd  arm 
january 2018 by jm

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