jm + amazon + business   3

Why Amazon Has No Profits (And Why It Works)
Amazon has perhaps 1% of the US retail market by value. Should it stop entering new categories and markets and instead take profit, and by extension leave those segments and markets for other companies? Or should it keep investing to sweep them into the platform? Jeff Bezos’s view is pretty clear: keep investing, because to take profit out of the business would be to waste the opportunity. He seems very happy to keep seizing new opportunities, creating new businesses, and using every last penny to do it.
amazon  business  strategy  capex  spending  stocks  investing  retail 
october 2014 by jm
This Internet Millionaire Has a New Deal For You - D Magazine
Good interview with Dave "Woot" Rutledge, who's now well out of Amazon and plans to get back into the crap-clearing business at Meh.com:

'Amazon’s fundamental misunderstanding of what made Woot great can be seen today on the site. It sells many items simultaneously. It’s a marketplace, not an event. The write-ups are cute, not subversively funny. Woot is no longer a bug-eyed beast with eight tentacles. It’s a pancake with two smaller pancakes for Mickey Mouse ears and a smile made of whipped cream. In 2012, two years into his three-year deal with Amazon, Rutledge walked. He won’t say how many millions his early departure cost him, but his contract with Amazon included a three-year non-compete clause from the date of sale, and he was watching the clock.'
amazon  ecommerce  business  b2c  woot.com  meh.com  dave-rutledge  selling  acquisitions 
june 2014 by jm
The Hole in Our Collective Memory: How Copyright Made Mid-Century Books Vanish - Rebecca J. Rosen - The Atlantic
A book published during the presidency of Chester A. Arthur has a greater chance of being in print today than one published during the time of Reagan.
This is not a gently sloping downward curve. Publishers seem unwilling to sell their books on Amazon for more than a few years after their initial publication. The data suggest that publishing business models make books disappear fairly shortly after their publication and long before they are scheduled to fall into the public domain. Copyright law then deters their reappearance as long as they are owned. On the left side of the graph before 1920, the decline presents a more gentle time-sensitive downward sloping curve.
business  books  legal  copyright  law  public-domain  reading  history  publishers  amazon  papers 
september 2013 by jm

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: