jm + airlines   5

AMERICAN AIRLINES 737MAX8: “LIKE A FLYING PRISON”
Quite unusual to see an honest review of travelling coach-class on an internal US flight. This is a massive stinker:

“I admit American isn’t my favourite airline, but this has made me seriously re-evaluate ever travelling on them again. And it won’t be economy. If this is Americans idea of their future standards, they can keep it. Aviation enthusiasts might find it really interesting- I felt like I was in a flying prison”.
coach  travel  aa  airlines  737  boeing  reviews  comfort 
7 days ago by jm
WHAT WENT WRONG IN BRITISH AIRWAYS DATACENTER IN MAY 2017?
A SPOF UPS. There was a similar AZ-wide outage in one of the Amazon DUB datacenters with a similar root cause, if I recall correctly -- supposedly redundant dual UPS systems were in fact interdependent, in that case, and power supply switchover wasn't clean enough to avoid affecting the servers.
Minutes later power was restored was resumed in what one source described as “uncontrolled fashion.” Instead of gradual restore, all power was restored at once resulting in a power surge.   BA CEO Cruz told BBC Radio this power surge  caused network hardware to fail. Also server hardware was damaged because of the power surge.

It seems as if the UPS was the single point of failure for power feed of the IT equipment in Boadicea House . The Times is reporting that the same UPS was powering both Heathrow based datacenters. Which could be a double single point of failure if true (I doubt it is)

The broken network  stopped the exchange of messages between different BA systems and application. Without messaging, there is no exchange of information between various applications. BA is using Progress Software’s Sonic [enterprise service bus].


(via Tony Finch)
postmortems  ba  airlines  outages  fail  via:fanf  datacenters  ups  power  progress  esb  j2ee 
may 2017 by jm
Why Airlines Want to Make You Suffer
'The fee [airline pricing] model comes with systematic costs that are not immediately obvious. Here’s the thing: in order for fees to work, there needs be something worth paying to avoid. That necessitates, at some level, a strategy that can be described as “calculated misery.” Basic service, without fees, must be sufficiently degraded in order to make people want to pay to escape it. And that’s where the suffering begins.'
travel  airlines  pricing  fees  economy  consumer  jetblue 
december 2014 by jm
Should Airplanes Be Flying Themselves?
Excellent Vanity Fair article on the AF447 disaster, covering pilots' team-leadership skills, Clipper Skippers, Alternate Law, and autopilot design: 'There is an old truth in aviation that the reasons you get into trouble become the reasons you don’t get out of it.'

Also interesting:

'The best pilots discard the [autopilot] automation naturally when it becomes unhelpful, and again there appear to be some cultural traits involved. Simulator studies have shown that Irish pilots, for instance, will gleefully throw away their crutches, while Asian pilots will hang on tightly. It’s obvious that the Irish are right, but in the real world Sarter’s advice is hard to sell. The automation is simply too compelling. The operational benefits outweigh the costs. The trend is toward more of it, not less. And after throwing away their crutches, many pilots today would lack the wherewithal to walk.'

(via Gavin Sheridan)
airlines  automation  flight  flying  accidents  post-mortems  af447  air-france  autopilot  alerts  pilots  team-leaders  clipper-skippers  alternate-law 
november 2014 by jm
Why Ryanair The Cookie Monster is just an urban myth
“If the price manipulation allegations were true, we would have expected to see price discrepancies in the results between Firefox and Chrome on day two. What we actually saw were exactly the same prices on both browsers.”
ryanair  pricing  airlines  travel  web  shopping  urban-myths 
june 2011 by jm

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